Christmas Standard Delivery Deadline 12/18
: :
Get up to 50% Off! Code: MXSHIP Ends: 12/12 Details
Apply
  1. Help

Charlie's Portfolio of Poetry

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

Charlie's Portfolio of Poetry - Page Text Content

FC: Charlie's Portfolio of Poetry | by Charlie K | Poetry

1: Table of Contents | 2-3 Poetry terms and examples 4-6 TPCASTT Poem 7-12 TPCASTT Analysis 13-14 Original narrative poem 15 Original ode poem

2: Haiku A Japanese poem which consists of three lines with five, seven, and five syllables respectively. Example: I hear crackling Crunch, of today’s new found day And know it won’t last | Poetry Terms and Examples | Antithesis A figure of speech in which words and phrases with opposite meaning are juxtaposed. Example: "To err is human, to forgive, divine." ~Alexander Pope

3: Haiku A Japanese poem which consists of three lines with five, seven, and five syllables respectively. Example: "I hear crackling Crunch, of today’s new found day And know it won’t last" ~Anonymous Paradox A statement that seems to contradict itself, or make itself untrue. Example: "If you wish to preserve your secret, wrap it up in frankness." ~Alexander Smith

4: TPCASTT Poem Birches by Robert Frost WHEN I see birches bend to left and right Across the line of straighter darker trees, I like to think some boy's been swinging them. But swinging doesn't bend them down to stay. Ice-storms do that. Often you must have seen them 5 Loaded with ice a sunny winter morning After a rain. They click upon themselves As the breeze rises, and turn many-colored As the stir cracks and crazes their enamel. Soon the sun's warmth makes them shed crystal shells 10 Shattering and avalanching on the snow-crust— Such heaps of broken glass to sweep away You'd think the inner dome of heaven had fallen. They are dragged to the withered bracken by the load, And they seem not to break; though once they are bowed 15 So low for long, they never right themselves: You may see their trunks arching in the woods Years afterwards, trailing their leaves on the ground Like girls on hands and knees that throw their hair

5: Before them over their heads to dry in the sun. 20 But I was going to say when Truth broke in With all her matter-of-fact about the ice-storm (Now am I free to be poetical?) I should prefer to have some boy bend them As he went out and in to fetch the cows— 25 Some boy too far from town to learn baseball, Whose only play was what he found himself, Summer or winter, and could play alone. One by one he subdued his father's trees By riding them down over and over again 30 Until he took the stiffness out of them, And not one but hung limp, not one was left For him to conquer. He learned all there was To learn about not launching out too soon And so not carrying the tree away 35 Clear to the ground. He always kept his poise To the top branches, climbing carefully With the same pains you use to fill a cup Up to the brim, and even above the brim. Then he flung outward, feet first, with a swish, 40 Kicking his way down through the air to the ground.

6: So was I once myself a swinger of birches; And so I dream of going back to be. It's when I'm weary of considerations, And life is too much like a pathless wood 45 Where your face burns and tickles with the cobwebs Broken across it, and one eye is weeping From a twig's having lashed across it open. I'd like to get away from earth awhile And then come back to it and begin over. 50 May no fate wilfully misunderstand me And half grant what I wish and snatch me away Not to return. Earth's the right place for love: I don't know where it's likely to go better. I'd like to go by climbing a birch tree, 55 And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more, But dipped its top and set me down again. That would be good both going and coming back. One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.

7: TPCASTT Analysis T: This poem will be a description of birch trees in a positive sense, or what they can represent. P: Enamel is Ice, Stir is a difference or change. A man wishes that birch tress were bent by children, not by ice storms. He then dreams of himself again being a birch swinger. C: "You may see their trunks arching in the woods Years afterwards, trailing their leaves on the ground Like girls on hands and knees that throw their hair Before them over their heads to dry in the sun." There is a simile comparing bent birches to girls on their hands and knees with their hair thrown before their heads. This represents how the branches and leaves sag downwards like hair when it is wet, and then how it sits immobily while drying calmly in the sun. "But I was going to say when Truth broke in With all her matter-of-fact about the ice-storm" Truth is personified to be like a disruptively corrective person. The line after-

8: wards says, "(Now am I free to e poetical?)", so truth is breaking in with its truth concerning ice storms and stopping the author's poetic language. His fantasy of swinging birches representing carefreeness and escape from confusion and grief is being corrected and defeated by truth, which represents reality. "So was I once myself a swinger of birches; And so I dream of going back to be. It's when I'm weary of considerations, And life is too much like a pathless wood Where your face burns and tickles with the cobwebs Broken across it, and one eye is weeping From a twig's having lashed across it open." He is using symbolism in a metaphor where he says he was once a swinger of birches. Swinger of Birches means one who has no cares, worries or grief and lives in the moment having fun, similar to an immature child. He was saying he was once someone like that, but is no longer. The author wishes that he could go back to it when he feels the pain and grief of reality.

9: "I'd like to get away from earth awhile And then come back to it and begin over. May no fate wilfully misunderstand me And half grant what I wish and snatch me away Not to return. Earth's the right place for love: I don't know where it's likely to go better. I'd like to go by climbing a birch tree, And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more, But dipped its top and set me down again. That would be good both going and coming back." Robert Frost is using metaphorical language here. He's saying he would wish to get away from reality and escape to a land of carefree contentness, swinging birches, but he does not want to leave his home on Earth because it's "the right place for love: I don't know where it's likely to go better." What the character would like to do is a climb a birch tree, go to the land of childish carefree happiness and ecape from the grief and pain of life, but then return back to reality. Then he says that it would be good both "swinging birches" and coming back to reality.

10: "I should prefer to have some boy bend them As he went out and in to fetch the cows— Some boy too far from town to learn baseball, Whose only play was what he found himself, Summer or winter, and could play alone. One by one he subdued his father's trees By riding them down over and over again Until he took the stiffness out of them, And not one but hung limp, not one was left For him to conquer. He learned all there was To learn about not launching out too soon And so not carrying the tree away Clear to the ground. He always kept his poise To the top branches, climbing carefully With the same pains you use to fill a cup Up to the brim, and even above the brim. Then he flung outward, feet first, with a swish, Kicking his way down through the air to the ground." There is imagery where Frost describes the boy swinging birches. This is here because he needs to describe the playfulness and childish carefreeness that goes along with swinging birches. He describes it as his fantasy of why they are bent because it is his fantasy to go back to 'swinging birches' and his escape of carefreeness and happiness.

11: He then goes on to write about how the boy preserves the trees and is careful not to bend them and render them useless. He doesn't want to deplete this fun, but he want to preserve and elongate it. "Such heaps of broken glass to sweep away You'd think the inner dome of heaven had fallen." There is a metaphor between the ice shards and the fallen inner dome of heaven. In a realistic sense, the ice shards are similar to when the dome of heaven shatters and falls, leaving shards on the ground. In another sense, Heaven can represent good and happiness, and it has fallen because of the ice storms. "One could do worse than be a swinger or birches." This line is saying that someone could do worse or be worse than someone who lives in the moment, is carefree, and without worry or guilt. A: Robert Frost writes about how the boy swings birches in a positive way and makes it sound more fun. On the other hand, he talks about the ice storms in a negative

12: manner by using less pleasant words and phrases. When Frost writes about how he ws once a swinger of birches, it is reflective and contemplative. S: There is a shift from line 41-42. Frost goes from describing birch swinging to contemplating himself as a birch swinger. In line 33, the boy switches from being careless and swinging birches to being more careful not to bend them. In lines 22-24, the poem shifts from describing how the ice storms bend the trees to the boy swinging birches. T: An explanation of birch trees' metaphorical representation and its importance and relevance. T: Living in the moment, being carefree, and escaping from reality and its grief are very good, but it should not replace reality.

13: Narrative Poem The Invasion by Charlie K. A quiet man sat in his evening chair listening to the murmur of his children and TV. Presently, the naive man thought his life was fair, but secretly he knew something felt amock. He contemplated this feeling as if he really cared. He gazed at the sky darkening and thought, "with a little luck, this sky'll clear up and we'll see pretty skies." The man wandered up to his bed and slept 'til two o'clock. He awoke in a cold sweat and gazed to his surprise; over the decrepid hill he saw a million crimson eyes. They approached in a measured stumble; their mass moving as one The frightened man thought and said, "Honey, get the gun!" He burst out of his house hastily to protect the ones he loved. Many others were facing them; they stood in shivering fear from thier doom, coming apocalypse, the zombies coming near. The zombies were a cloud of locusts, the townsfolk were a flea. His rifle turned to him and said, "Get out there and use me!" He took in a hard gulp and reluctantly ran forward. The rest of his recollection was scarce and unfocused. The zombies swarmed and grabbed.

14: The people strategized and fought. The zombies overwhelmed and destroyed. The people held fast, but to defend they ought. They could not; they fell behind. The zombies pillaged; the zombies walked. The people hid; they were blind. The zombies ravaged through. Soon the animals left their town. The people cautiously emerged They gazed upon destruction, but saw their pretty skies.

15: Ode Poem Ode to Water by Charlie K. Water is great Water is there Water in a crate Without it I'd be bare It was water that saved us all from the lethal slaughter of incessant thirst. Food is the daughter, but water was first. Water is home to those who swim. But those who roam, It's their only whim. It heals the wounds of body and soul, It corrects goons and makes people full.

Sizes: mini|medium|large|behemoth
Default User
  • By: Charlie
  • Joined: over 7 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 1
No contributors

About This Mixbook

  • Title: Charlie's Portfolio of Poetry
  • Tags: None
  • Published: over 7 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order