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Classic Mixbook

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BC: The End

FC: Shasta Herr & Kaitlyn Glass | The Cold War

1: The Berlin Wall Was a concrete wall built in 1961 that kept the communist east of germany, and prevented east germans from escaping into west berlin. the wall stood until 1989. | The Berlin Wall

2: Bay Of Pigs | An Invasion of Cuba in 1961, which was authorized by J.F.K for the purpose of over throwing Castro's regime, organized by the CIA, executed by Cuban exiles, and defeated by Castro's sources

4: A Confirmation between the United States and the Soviet Union in fall of 1962, over the building of the Soviet missiles launching site in Cuba, in response to which the United States established a quatrain to prevent Soviet ships from transporting missiles to Cuba and to demand all of Soviet weapons and the island, after a few days the soviet union aggreed to withdraw its missiles and J.F.K aggreed not to invade.

5: Cuban Missile Crisis

6: The Vietnam War | The Vietnam War was a Cold War era military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955[A 1] to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War and was fought between North Vietnam, supported by its communist allies, and the government of South Vietnam, supported by the United States and other anti-communist nations

8: Little Rock Nine | Little Rock Nine was a group of African-American students who were enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school. this is considered to be one of the most important events in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. On their first day of school, troops from the Arkansas National Guard would not let them enter the school and they were followed by mobs making threats to them.

9: Sit-Ins | A sit-in or sit-down is a form of protest that involves occupying seats or sitting down on the floor of an establishment | In a sit-in, protesters remain until they are evicted, usually by force, or arrested, or until their requests have been met. Sit-ins have historically been a highly successful form of protest because they cause disruption that draws attention to the protesters' cause. They are a non-violent way to effectively shut down an area or business. The forced removal of protesters, and sometimes the use of violence against them, often arouses sympathy from the public, increasing the chances of the demonstrators reaching their goal.

10: On February 1, 1960, a group of black college students from North Carolina A&T University refused to leave a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina where they had been denied service. This sparked a wave of other sit-ins in college towns across the South. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, or SNCC (pronounced "snick"), was created on the campus of Shaw University in Raleigh two months later to coordinate these sit-ins, support their leaders, and publicize their activities. | SNCC

11: Freedom riders were civil rights activists that rode interstate buses into the segregated southern United States to test the United States Supreme Court.The first Freedom Ride left Washington, D.C., on May 4, 1961, was scheduled to arrive in New Orleans on May 17. | Freedom Riders

12: In the fall of 1962 the college town of Oxford, Mississippi, erupted in violence. At the center of the controversy stood James Meredith, an African American who was attempting to register at the all-white University of Mississippi, known as "Ole Miss." Meredith had the support of the federal government, which insisted that Mississippi honor the rights of all its citizens, regardless of race. Mississippi's refusal led to a showdown between state and federal authorities and the storming of the campus by a segregationist mob. Two people died and dozens were injured. In the end, Ole Miss, the state of Mississippi, and the nation were forever changed. | Integration Of Ole Miss

13: The Birmingham campaign was a strategic movement organized by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to bring attention to the unequal treatment that black Americans endured in Birmingham, Alabama. The campaign ran during the spring of 1963, culminating in widely publicized confrontations between black youth and white civic authorities, that eventually pressured the municipal government to change the city's discrimination laws. Organizers, led by Martin Luther King, Jr. used nonviolent direct action tactics to defy laws they considered unfair. | Birmingham Protests

14: March On Washington | The march was organized by a group of civil rights, labor, and religious organizations, under the theme "jobs, and freedom."Estimates of the number of participants varied from 200,000 (police) to over 300,000 (leaders of the march). Observers estimated that 75–80% of the marchers were black and the rest were white and other minorities.

15: Civil Rights Act | Outlawed major forms of discrimination against blacks and women including racial segreggation

16: Freedom Summer | In the summer of 1964, black voters in the southern United States were to alter forever the oppressive rule that had dominated their lives since the end of the Civil War They would march. They would demand. They would desegregate. They would vote and some would die but they would overcome.

17: 24th Ammendment | The Twenty-fourth Amendment (Amendment XXIV) prohibits both Congress and the states from conditioning the right to vote in federal elections on payment of a poll tax or other types of tax. The amendment was proposed by Congress to the states on August 27, 1962, and was ratified by the states on January 23, 1964.

18: The Selma to Montgomery marches were three marches in 1965 that marked the political and emotional peak of the American civil rights movement. They grew out of the voting rights movement in Selma, Alabama, launched by local African-Americans who formed the Dallas County Voters League (DCVL). In 1963, the DCVL and organizers from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began voter-registration work. When white resistance to Black voter registration proved intractable, the DCVL requested the assistance of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, who brought many prominent civil rights and civic leaders to support voting rights.

19: March To Selma

20: Voting rights act | The Voting Rights Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 1973–1973aa-6)[1] is a landmark piece of national legislation in the United States that outlawed discriminatory voting practices that had been responsible for the widespread disenfranchisement of African Americans in the U.S.[2]

21: Black Panthers | (originally the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was an African-American revolutionary leftist organization. It was active in the United States from 1966 until 1982. The Black Panther Party achieved national and international notoriety through its involvement in the Black Power movement and in U.S. politics of the 1960s and 70s. The anti-racism of that time is today considered one of the most significant social, political and cultural currents in U.S. history. The group's "provocative rhetoric, militant posture, and cultural and political flourishes permanently altered the contours of American Identity."[1]

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shasta Herr
  • By: shasta H.
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About This Mixbook

  • Title: Classic Mixbook
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  • Started: over 5 years ago
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