Christmas Standard Delivery Deadline 12/18
: :
Get up to 50% Off! Code: MXSHIP Ends: 12/12 Details
Apply
  1. Help

Naturalism

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

Naturalism - Page Text Content

BC: The End | "Encyclopedia Smithsonian: American History Timeline." Smithsonian Institution. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 June 2010. . | "American History Timeline: 1780-2005." Animated Atlas of American History. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 June 2010. . | "Timeline of United States history - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 June 2010. .

FC: Naturalism | 1890s-1950s | Brookes Midgett

1: Presidents | 1890-1950

2: Benjamin Harrison

3: Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. | His presidential administration is most remembered for its economic legislation, including the McKinley Tariff and the Sherman Antitrust Act, and for annual federal spending that reached one billion dollars for the first time.

4: Grover Cleveland

5: Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States. | Cleveland was the leader of the pro-business Bourbon Democrats who opposed high tariffs, free silver, inflation, imperialism, and subsidies to business, farmers or veterans. He was an icon of American conservatives.

6: William McKinley

7: William McKinley, Jr. (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was the 25th President of the United States, and the last veteran of the American Civil War to be elected to the office. | By the 1880s McKinley was a national Republican leader; his signature issue was high tariffs on imports as a formula for prosperity, as typified by his McKinley Tariff of 1890. As the Republican candidate in the 1896 presidential election, he upheld the gold standard, and promoted pluralism among ethnic groups.

8: Theodore Roosevelt

9: He is well remembered for his energetic personality, range of interests and achievements, leadership of the Progressive Movement, model of masculinity, and his "cowboy" image. In 1901, President William McKinley was assassinated, and Roosevelt became president at the age of 42, taking office at the youngest age of any U.S. President in history | Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919)was the 26th President of the United States.

10: William Howard Taft

11: William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was the 27th President of the United States and later the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. He is the only person to have served in both offices. | In his first and only term, President Taft's domestic agenda emphasized trust-busting, civil service reform, strengthening the Interstate Commerce Commission, improving the performance of the postal service, and passage of the Sixteenth Amendment. Abroad, Taft sought to further the economic development of undeveloped nations in Latin America and Asia through the method he termed "Dollar Diplomacy."

12: Woodrow Wilson

13: Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924)was the 28th President of the United States. He was leading intellectual of the Progressive Era | Wilson persuaded a Democratic Congress to pass the Federal Reserve Act, Federal Trade Commission, the Clayton Antitrust Act, the Federal Farm Loan Act and America's first-ever federal progressive income tax in the Revenue Act of 1913. Wilson brought many white Southerners into his administration, and tolerated their expansion of segregation in many federal agencies..

14: Warren Harding

15: Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 until his death from a heart attack in 1923. | His conservative stance on issues such as taxes, affable manner, and campaign manager Harry Daugherty's 'make no enemies' strategy enabled Harding to become the compromise choice at the 1920 Republican National Convention. During his presidential campaign, in the aftermath of World War I; he promised a return to "normalcy"; an "America first" campaign that encouraged industrialization and a strong economy independent of foreign influence.

16: Calvin Coolidge

17: John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. (July 4, 1872 – January 5, 1933) was the 30th President of the United States (1923–1929). | He was elected as the 29th Vice President in 1920 and succeeded to the Presidency upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding in 1923. Elected in his own right in 1924, he gained a reputation as a small-government conservative.

18: Herbert Hoover

19: Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964) was the 31st President of the United States (1929–1933). | To date, Hoover is the last cabinet secretary to be directly elected President of the United States, as well as one of only two Presidents to have been elected President without electoral experience or high military rank. When the Wall Street Crash of 1929 struck less than eight months after he took office, Hoover tried to combat the ensuing Great Depression with volunteer efforts, none of which produced economic recovery during his term.

20: Franklin Roosevelt

21: Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945)was the 32nd President of the United States and a central figure in world events during the mid-20th century, leading the United States during a time of worldwide economic crisis and world war. | The only American president elected to more than two terms, he forged a durable coalition that realigned American politics for decades. FDR defeated incumbent Republican Herbert Hoover in November 1932, at the depths of the Great Depression. He led the United States through World War II, dying at the start of his fourth term just as victory was near over Germany and Japan.

22: Harry Truman

23: Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the 33rd President of the United States (1945–1953). | Truman faced challenge after challenge in domestic affairs. The disorderly postwar reconversion of the economy of the United States was marked by severe shortages, numerous strikes, and the passage of the Taft–Hartley Act over his veto. After his re-election he was able to pass only one of the proposals in his Fair Deal program.

Sizes: mini|medium|large|super size
Default User
  • By: Brookes M.
  • Joined: over 6 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 1
No contributors

About This Mixbook

  • Title: Naturalism
  • Tags: None
  • Published: over 6 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order