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Carrie Blowe Baby Book

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Carrie Blowe Baby Book - Page Text Content

BC: The End... For Now.

FC: Carrie Blowe

1: On March 12, 1995 the world was blessed with a beautiful baby girl named Carrie Elizabeth Blowe.

2: While my mother was pregnant with me she gained about 40 pounds and I was only about 3 days early. My mom didn't really have any abnormalities while she was pregnant with me.

3: Cute as a button | My father, on the other hand was stricken with morning sickness for about three months during my mom's pregnancy. My sister was the problem causer during pregnancy. My mom was only put on bed rest once while she was pregnant and it was only for the last week of her pregnancy.

4: I was named after my grandmother on my father's side, her name was Carrie Edith Johnson and my mother fell in love with the name Carrie when she first heard about my father's mother.

6: I did not carry on the name Edith, however, because my father’s family is a family of middle names. My father’s name is Alan Barry Blowe but he goes by Barry; as is the case with all of my aunts on his side of the family.The only other name that I’m aware of is when my parents thought I was going to be a boy and my mother had picked the name Jeffery David Blowe for me even though my dad wanted me to be a junior since I had an older sister rather than an older brother.

7: My father and mother: Alan and Jennie Blowe

8: My mom was in labor for about 5 hours. I was 6 lbs and 7 oz and 19 inches. I learned to sit up at 5 months old, I believe. I was nearly two years old when my first tooth came in. I was almost 16 months when I learned to walk. I was officially potty trained by the time I was about four years old. I didn't lose my first tooth until I was in fourth grade. I was a late bloomer as you can tell.

9: Birth - 2yrs Sensorimotor (Object permanence) 2 yrs - 6/7 yrs Preoperational (pretend play and egocentrism) 7 yrs - 11 yrs Concrete Operational (conservation and mathematical transformations. 12 yrs - Adulthood Formal Operational (abstract logic and potential for mature moral reasoning) | Timeline of average brain development.

10: Myelination is the process of the myelin sheath forming around the axons of the neurons in the brain. Myelination occurs to allow complex brain functions such as abstract thinking. As early teens, the development of the myelin sheath occurs more in the frontal lobe which has to do with planning, long-term thinking and decision making.

11: I believe I'm still going through myelination because I still have trouble thinking ahead and making decisions that will shape my future. I was especially affected by myelination during my junior high years because I was beginning to think beyond myself and decide what type of career I wanted to pursue and where to go to college.

12: I currently wear contacts although I have no idea what my vision is. I got glasses when I was in 3rd grade but I didn't start wearing them until 9th grade. There isn't a single person in my family (that I'm aware of) that does not have to wear glasses. There are two people in my family that I know need glasses they just don't want to wear them.

13: I'd say puberty does not come for every adolescent at the same age. Puberty is when a young person begins to further develop into adulthood. Often times adolescents get acne, females develop breasts, voice changes occur, girls begin their periods, and adolescents become sexually mature.

14: My first word was Daddy when I was about 8 months old. This was probably my first word because it was so easy to form. I used to say Lello Mellow” for “Mellow Yellow, the soda drink. | Telegraphic speech is an early speech stage when children are using mostly nouns and verbs. This stage is named because the type of speech resembles a telegram.

15: Overgeneralization in children is when they link the word for one thing to another object. In the book an example used is when a little girl learns the word cow and then calls another big animal with four legs cow. Overextention is when a child uses a word to describe everything that shares the same characteristics. Like if I sat a pot on my head, my little sister would call it a hat because it's on my head. | When I was younger I thought that anything that flew was a bird. I called mumble bees, wasps, and anything that I saw flying, a bird. I had problems stuttering when I was younger because I tried to use BIG words that I didn't know how to pronounce.

16: I was BY FAR more attached to my mother than my father. I didn't even like men when I was a baby. I didn't willingly go to my grandpa until I was about 9 months old and it was only because he had ice cream. Imprinting is when an animal forms an attachment during an important part of their Iife. I'd say the imprinting theory supports my attachment because during my childhood development, a critical period in my life, I attached to my mother because she provided comfort and nourishment for me. I formed an attachment with a pink and white striped blanket as well and I called it bankie. I think I attached to the blanket because it reminded me of my mom for its warmth, softness, and smell and after my parents got divorced, my sister and I went back and forth between houses and it was the only way to get me to go to sleep, by giving me the blanket.

17: Contact comfort is the feeling of comfort the infant or young child gets from physical contact with the parent or caregiver. My attachments are the epitome of Harlow's contact comfort theory. I formed these attachments merely because my mother and the “bankie” gave me comfort when in contact with them because of the secure feeling produced by the object and my mom.

18: Without any attachments a child can be seriously disturbed. Children become detached, frightened, and sometimes aggressive. These children are scarred for a long time, however, children are resilient and can grow up to be normal adults.

19: As adults, intimate relationships reflect our attachments from infancy. Our adult relationships exhibit either secure, trusting attachment; insecure, anxious attachment; or avoidance of attachment completely. Our adult attachments affect our children as well and how we interact with our children. According to Rholes, those adults that avoid attachment find parenting less satisfying and more stressful.

20: I consider myself to be along the lines of the Identity Moratorium status according to James Marcia's theory of development. I have made decisions about my future and am pretty convinced that I know what I want to do with the rest of my life, however, I haven't made any commitments to theory of development. I have made decisions about my future and am pretty convinced that I know what I want to do with the rest of my life, however, I haven't made any commitments to my plans yet. I'm currently in a crisis in regards to coming up on my college years. I don't know how I will handle such a big change, especially not having my parents’ right by my side guiding me through everything. I don't know who I'll be while I'm in college or who I'll be after college and that frightens me.

22: When I was younger, I thought that when I put on sunglasses, no one could see me. I felt like the sunglasses protected my eyes and they therefore protected my entire body so if you couldn't see my eyes then you couldn't see me at all. Part of my “theory of invisibility” was the fact that I didn't want anyone to see me so when I put the sunglasses on, I really believed that no one could unless I wanted them too. If they couldn't see me, they couldn't point out any of my physical flaws but then they just all thought that I was a weird kid.

23: Stages five and six of Erikson's Stages of Psychosocial Development are when majority of the issues in a person's life arise. During stage five, a person is still very young and trying to figure out who they are and what sets them apart from others. What makes this stage worse is that along with one's intrapersonal conflicts, interpersonal conflicts occur as well. Peer pressure is also strongest during this period. Many teens are pressured into drinking, doing drugs, having sex, bullying others or being bullied. Parents also pressure their children to make smart decisions and push mature decisions on their children, perhaps too early for some. All the pressures of being a teen can get to a person; getting through such pressures and coming out on the positive side feels near impossible when you're going through it.

24: Based on the categories provided by Thomas and Chess, I would say that I was a slow-to-warm-up baby. I did not like new people. I had three or four people that I would let hold me when I was a baby: my mother, my grandma, my aunt Alene, and my aunt Connie. That was it though; I squalled when I was given to my father, my grandfather, anyone on my father's side of the family, and especially any strangers.

25: Stages five and six of Erikson's Stages of Psychosocial Development are when majority of the issues in a person's life arise. During stage five, a person is still very young and trying to figure out who they are and what sets them apart from others. What makes this stage worse is that along with one's intrapersonal conflicts, interpersonal conflicts occur as well. Peer pressure is also strongest during this period. Many teens are pressured into drinking, doing drugs, having sex, bullying others or being bullied. Parents also pressure their children to make smart decisions and push mature decisions on their children, perhaps too early for some. All the pressures of being a teen can get to a person; getting through such pressures and coming out on the positive side feels near impossible when you're going through it.

26: During stage six, most people are out of their parents’ house and on their own completely. This brings on the biggest changes of one's life. Usually during this stage, one is starting their career, buying their first house, buying their first cars, getting married, having children, and settling down in one place. At this point in your life, you can't run home when you get scared or when you feel overwhelmed. Life hits you hard in this stage and you just have to stand your ground and deal with it.

27: During my junior high years I had a severe issue with who I was as a person. I didn't really think for myself in any way. I let my friends and their actions dictate what I did, when I did it, and who I did it with. I didn't have my own style, opinions, or personality really. I tried to fit into the “norm” within my group of friends because I was scared to stand out apart from them. I was scared to be too much bigger or too much smaller than my friends because I felt like they would pick on me or point out that I wasn't perfect physically. I also had problems with depression during these years because I wasn't my own person. I couldn't be my own person because I was far too worried about what others would think about me. I didn't want my peers to think that I was awkward (which I was but who isn't at least a little during their junior high years), ugly, mean, too nice, or “different.” As I moved into my later high school years, I think I've become more self-aware.

28: I know more who I am currently. I know that I will change as time and my experiences go on but I know that I have a certain personality and I know that no matter how I change, I will keep the same basic principles and morals. I know that I am still influenced by my peers, quite a bit really, but I'm more conscious about who I let influence me and in what ways. I can think for myself now and make my own decisions based on what I know is right and what is wrong. I'm far more confident about my body now and I understand that people come in all shapes and sizes. I've distanced myself from those friends and peers that are not supportive and that only find things wrong with me; the same friends and peers that try to tell me how to think and act.

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  • By: Carrie B.
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  • Title: Carrie Blowe Baby Book
  • Psychology Baby Book.
  • Tags: Carrie Blowe Psychology Baby Book
  • Published: over 3 years ago

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