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Famous Missourians

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S: Famous Missourians Gach 2009

FC: Famous Missourians by: St. Joseph Elementary School 4th Grade Gach 2009

1: Welcome to my Mixbook technology curriculum project! The following pages are examples of work that students might create and publish following the directions of my Famous Missourians lesson plan found at the end of this Mixbook. Technology is a powerful motivator for students. They can create projects that are aesthetically pleasing and that can be published to share with other students, family, and friends. In addition to being viewed on the Web, a Mixbook creation can be printed out as a hard copy book that can be housed in the classroom, presented to the school library, or purchased by parents and guardians as a keepsake of their student's work. -Kelly Gach

2: Harry S Truman was born on May 8, 1884 in Lamar, Missouri. When he was six, his family moved to Independence, Missouri. In 1901, he graduated high school from Independence High School. Truman’s poor eyesight and his family’s lack of money kept Truman from pursuing a college degree. Instead, he held a series of jobs including: timekeeper, bank clerk, and mailroom worker. In 1905, Truman joined the Kansas City National Guard. When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Truman was stationed in France and was made a captain in a new battery unit. After the war ended in 1918, Truman returned to Independence and married his childhood friend, Bess Wallace. Shortly after, his only child, Mary Margaret was born.

3: In 1922, Truman was elected to the post of Eastern District Judge for Jackson County. Truman then ran for United States Senate and easily won in 1934. In 1944, Franklin Roosevelt chose Truman as his vice presidential candidate. He had been on the job only eighty-two days when Roosevelt died on April 12, 1945. Truman became the thirty-third president of the United States, and the only president who served after 1897 to not hold a college degree. | As president, Truman led the nation through the end of World War II, and became the first, and so far the only, president to authorize nuclear warfare. He also issued policies like the Marshall Plan, the Truman Doctrine, and institutions like the United Nations to try to prevent another world war. After his presidency, Truman returned to Independence and remained active in politics, while writing his memoirs. At eighty-eight years old, he died from multiple organ failure on December 26, 1972 at a Kansas City hospital. - Shaun G. and Aleesha M.

4: Laura Ingalls Wilder was born February 7, 1867 in Pepin, Wisconsin. As a young girl, Laura moved with her family from place to place across America until finally settling in 1879 in what would become De Smet, South Dakota. Laura was mostly self-taught, because her family’s frequent moves often prevented her from attending regular school. In 1882, at the age of fifteen, she received her teaching certificate. While teaching, Laura met Almanzo Manly Wilder. After marrying on August 25, 1885, Laura quit teaching to help her husband on their farm. Almanzo and Laura had a daughter, Rose, on December 5, 1886. In August 1889, Laura gave birth to a baby boy who died shortly after. After losing their house to a fire, the Wilders moved to Mansfield, Missouri, on July 17, 1894. This is where they would spend the rest of their lives.

5: During their travels to Missouri, Laura kept a journal of their experiences. After reaching Lamar, Missouri, she sent her accounts to the De Smet News. These accounts became her first published writing. After moving to Missouri, Laura spent her time writing and completed her first autobiographical work in the late 1920s. Her book, Pioneer Girl, was sent to many publishers; however, received no interest. Laura learned from this and changed many features to better her story, including changing the focus of her story towards writings specifically for children. In 1932, Laura published the first of her eight “Little House” books, Little House in the Big Woods. Her other books followed over the years. On February 10, 1957, Laura died at the age of ninety. Several years after Laura’s death, a very successful television series based on her “Little House” series, began and ran for nine seasons. - Maggie G. and Luke T.

6: George Washington Carver is thought to have been born on July 12, 1864 (although the exact year is not known for sure). He was born to slave parents in Diamond Grove, Missouri. George grew up sickly and was not able to work in the fields. Early on, he developed a great interest in plants and was very eager to learn about them. George earned the nickname, The Plant Doctor, because he often made his own medicines on the farm. George’s formal education began when he was twelve years old. Previously, his race had kept him from being accepted in schools. After realizing that no school was available locally for his race, he decided to move to Newton County in southwest Missouri to attend school. In 1890, George gained acceptance to Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa, and then transferred to Iowa Agricultural College to further his studies in science. Upon graduation in 1894, he was offered a position on the school’s faculty, the first of his race to be accorded the honor.

7: In 1895, George co-authored papers on the prevention and cures for fungus diseases affecting cherry plants. In 1896, he received his master’s degree in agriculture and in 1897 discovered two funguses that would be named after him. Also that year, George accepted the position of Director of Agriculture at Tuskegee Institute. At Tuskegee, George invented his crop rotation method, which changed the way that farmers planted their crops and helped them to produce more than ever. He then developed 325 different uses for the extra peanuts from the crops. George went on to develop products for sweet potatoes, pecans, and soybeans. He is also known for his work in the fields of soil fertilization and crop diversification. In 1935, he was appointed collaborator in the Division of Plant Mycology and Disease Survey of the Bureau of Plant Industry of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. George died on January 5, 1943 on the campus of Tuskegee Institute. A national monument has been established on the farmland where George grew up. Even after his death, George continued to be nominated for various awards and honors. In 1990 he was inducted into The National Inventor's Hall of Fame for his accomplishments. - Cameron J. and Chase K.

9: Mixbook Lesson Plan SECTION ONE Author: Kelly Gach Email Address: kegach@gmail.com Semester Created: Summer 2009 LESSON OVERVIEW Title: Famous Missourians Brief Description: Students will work individually or in pairs to create a web-based classroom Mixbook detailing the lives and contributions of famous Missourians. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS/GENERALIZATIONS: The student understands that many Missourians have had great impacts on Missouri and national heritage. ENGAGING QUESTION/SCENARIO: The teacher will list the names of several famous Missourians on the board (Maya Angelou, Josephine Baker, Susan Elizabeth Blow, Lewis and Clark, Thomas Hart Benton, Daniel Boone, Martha Jane Canary (Calamity Jane), George Washington Carver, Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain), Charles Stark Draper, Rose Philippine Duchesne, Walter Elias (Walt Disney), James Fergason, Eugene Field, Edwin Hubble, Jack S. Kilby, James Langston Hughes, Scott Joplin, William Lear, Charles Lindberg, John Berry Meachum, Marianne Moore, Charlie "Bird" or "Yardbird" Parker, James Cash Penny, General John J. Pershing, Charles M. Russell, Nellie Tayloe Ross, Sara Teasdale, Harry S. Truman, Roy Wilkins, Laura Ingalls Wilder) and ask the students “What do you think these people have in common?” The teacher will remind the class that they have already learned about a few of these names. The class will discuss. The teacher will then ask “What makes a person famous?” The class will then discuss this. The teacher will show the students the example of the WWI Mixbook (http://www.Mixbook.com/photo-books/education/world-war-i-2785). The teacher will then explain that the class will be making a similar book that the class will publish. The teacher will explain that the students will have the option to purchase the book. In addition, the teacher will purchase two books. One will be kept in the classroom and the teacher will use it as an example for other classes. The other will be donated to the school library. SUBJECT AREA(S) (Put an X by all relevant subject areas.) ___ Math ___ Science ___ Reading X Writing X Social Studies/History ___ Foreign Language ___ Art ___ Music ___ PE X Information and Technology Literacy GRADE LEVEL (Put an X by all relevant grade levels.) ___ Kindergarten ___ Grade 1 ___ Grade 2 ___ Grade 3 X Grade 4 ___ Grade 5 ___ Grade 6 ___ K-12 Elementary ___ K-12 Middle ___ K-12 Secondary ___ Secondary DETAILED LESSON DESCRIPTION GLE #1: The SWBAT identify and describe the significance of the individuals from Missouri who have made contributions to our state and national heritage; (GLE Social Studies, Missouri, United States and World History, Strand 2a Knowledge of continuity and change in the history of Missouri, the United States and the world, Concept A - Grade 4) (Performance Standards 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 1.8, 2.1, 2.2, 2.7) GLE #2: The SWBAT identify, select and use visual, graphic and auditory aids. Use and evaluate primary and secondary sources. Identify and use library and media resources; (GLE Social Studies, Tools of Social Science Inquiry, Strand 7 Knowledge of the use of tools of social science inquiry (such as surveys, statistics, maps and documents), Concept A - Grade 4) (Performance Standards 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.7, 2.1, 2.2) GLE #3: The SWBAT write informational reports in a format appropriate to an intended audience and purpose; (GLE Communication Arts, Writing, Strand 3 Write effectively in various forms and types of writing - - - continued, Concept E - Grade 4) (Performance Standards 1.1, 1.8, 2.1, 2.7) STUDENT ASSESSMENT The teacher will make observations, review the outline provided in the student prompt sheets, and review the rough draft provided in the student prompt sheets for formative assessment tools. For summative assessment tools, the teacher will utilize the rubric to grade on historical accuracy; ensure that the students included all required elements; ensure that the text, graphics, organization and background all compliment and appropriately represent the students’ and class’ work; check for appropriate internet use; and grade for correct spelling and grammar. This will be based on the students’ final written work and their work in their Mixbook page. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT CRITERIA (See front page link on my pbworks page for a complete scoring guide for this lesson.) COLLABORATION •After assignment is complete, students would benefit from the opportunity to share the classroom book with other classes and grades. •Students would benefit from the opportunity to work with the Instructional Technology Specialist for an hour to discuss the options in Mixbooks, before they begin working. •Students would also benefit from the opportunity to have the Instructional Technology Specialist in the classroom to answer questions for an hour on day nine of the assignment. LESSON IMPLEMENTATION Length of Unit (hours, days): 10 days at 1 hour each Prerequisite Skills: Prior to completing this activity, students should be able to use electronic as well as written resources to gather information. They will need to have a working knowledge of the writing process. He or she must also be able to perform fluent keyboarding skills. ACCOMMODATION OPTIONS •Students requiring special assistance will be allowed to work with a partner on all activities. •Some students may prefer to learn individually, so the students will be allowed the opportunity to work individually. •Some students may prefer auditory learning situations. This will be accommodated for by allowing group discussions and the sharing of ideas. •If needed, students will use the technology accommodations in Windows XP. MANAGEMENT/ORGANIZATION TIPS •The teacher and Instructional Technology Specialist should have working knowledge of Mixbook. •The teacher and Instructional Technology Specialist will need to be available throughout the assignment to assist students as necessary. •The teacher will need to continuously check progress throughout the assignment to ensure that the students are on task and able to finish on time. •The teacher should allow for flexibility in her time line and add or take away days to meet the students’ needs. MATERIALS AND RESOURCES REQUIRED FOR UNIT •Pencils •Paper •Computer Access •Internet Access •Encyclopedias and Other Written Documents •Student Prompt Sheet: The Life of a Famous Missourian (see front page of my pbworks page for a link to the Student Prompt Sheet) •Parent Note with Purchasing and Viewing Information TECHNOLOGY Web-based resources (name and link) •Access to classroom Mixbook website (The teacher will have already accessed www.Mixbook.com to have a book started) •WWI Mixbook http://www.Mixbook.com/photo-books/education/world-war-i-2785 •Google Images http://images.google.com/ •Flickr http://www.flickr.com/ HELPFUL TECHNOLOGY Web-based resources (name and link) •Hall of Famous Missourians, Missouri State Capitol http://www.house.mo.gov/famous.aspx •The State Historical Society of Missouri: Famous Missourians http://shs.umsystem.edu/famousmissourians/famousmissourians.shtml •Encyclopedia Online http://www.encyclopedia.com/ •Biography.com http://www.biography.com/ UNIT PLAN FLOW CHART/TIMELINE Day 1: The class will meet in the computer room. The students will need computer and internet access. The teacher will present the Engaging Scenario/Question and allow time for class discussion. The teacher will then explain that the students will have the option to work individually or in pairs. The teacher will explain that the students will be responsible for researching a Famous Missourian who has contributed to Missouri or national heritage. The teacher will give the students the choice of choosing a famous Missourian from the list on the board or selecting a Missourian that is not on the board, with prior approval from the teacher. The teacher will keep a list of the chosen Missourians, and no two students or pairs will be allowed to choose the same person. The teacher will explain that students working individually will be responsible for writing a biography for their chosen person that will fill one Mixbook page (This is approximately 1/3 of a Microsoft Word page). Students working in pairs will be responsible for filling two Mixbook pages with a biography on the person they chose (this is approximately -3/4 of a Microsoft Word page). The teacher will remind the students of what they have learned about biographies. The teacher will explain that the student will also need to find at least three images from either Google Images or Flickr to compliment their page. They will also be responsible for choosing an attractive background for their page that will compliment the rest of the book. The teacher will again show the students the example of the WWI Mixbook, pointing out how the images and background compliment the written work and the flow of the book. The teacher will briefly explain the scoring rubric that will be used to grade the students’ final work. The teacher will explain that the students will begin researching the next day, and he/she will explain more information about the research process tomorrow. However, if the students have access to text about their chosen person, they may bring it to class for the research process the next day. The teacher will allow the students to play with Mixbook for the remainder of the class, to get ideas of what will do on their pages. (If an Instructional Technology Specialist is available, this would be the appropriate time for him/her to show the students Mixbook details. Otherwise, the teacher can walk the students through some Mixbook options.) For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 2: The class will again meet in the computer room. The teacher will need to bring encyclopedias and other sources for the students to use in their research. He/she will also bring the student prompt sheets and pencils for each student. The students will need computer and internet access. The teacher will explain that the students may use the internet or written sources to research the life of their selected individual. If using the internet, the students may use the following websites: Hall of Famous Missourians, Missouri State Capitol http://www.house.mo.gov/famous.aspx, The State Historical Society of Missouri: Famous Missourians http://shs.umsystem.edu/famousmissourians/famousmissourians.shtml, Encyclopedia Online http://www.encyclopedia.com/, Biography.com http://www.biography.com/. (If the students would like to use other websites, they must first get permission from the teacher.) The teacher will briefly explain reliable versus non-reliable sources. The teacher will hand out the student prompt sheet: The Life of a Famous Missourian. The teacher will explain that the students will use this sheet to gather information and then write a rough draft. The students will be responsible for listing: the date of birth and death, where in Missouri he/she lived, what type of education he/she received, what made he/she famous. Each individual or pair will be responsible for submitting one student prompt for their chosen person. The students will then use the information gathered to write a rough draft in their own words. The teacher will remind the students what they have learned about writing for the appropriate audience. The rough draft will need to be submitted for teacher approval, before the student can begin to work in Mixbook. The teacher will explain that the students will have the rest of the time today to gather research. The students will also have the next three days (one hour each) to gather information and begin writing their rough drafts. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 3: The class will again meet in the computer room. The teacher will bring pencils and extra student prompt sheets. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets from the day before. The students will need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding students what they have discussed and completed so far in this unit. The teacher will then explain that the students may work independently to continue gathering information while she walks around the room to check on progress, answers any questions, and gets all previously absent students caught up on the process. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 4: The class will again meet in the computer room. The teacher will bring pencils and extra student prompt sheets. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets. The students will need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding students what they have discussed and completed so far in this unit. The teacher will then explain that the students may work independently to continue gathering information while she walks around the room to check on progress, answers any questions, and gets all previously absent students caught up on the process. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 5: The class will again meet in the computer room. The teacher will bring pencils and extra student prompt sheets. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets. The students will need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding students what they have discussed and completed so far in this unit. The teacher will then explain that the students may work independently to continue gathering information while she walks around the room to check on progress, answers any questions, and gets all previously absent students caught up on the process. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 6: The class will meet in the computer room. The teacher will bring pencils and paper. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets. The students might need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding students what they have discussed and completed so far in this unit. The teacher will explain that the students need to begin writing their rough drafts, if they have not already done so. The teacher will remind the students about the required lengths previously discussed. The students will need to get teacher approval upon completion of their rough draft. The teacher will explain that the students will have the rest of the class today and the next two days to write their rough drafts and get approval. The teacher will then explain that the students may work independently while she walks around the room to check on progress, answers any questions, and gets all previously absent students caught up on the process. The teacher will allow students to begin working in Mixbook once they have received approval on their rough drafts. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 7: The class will meet in the computer room. The teacher will bring pencils and paper. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets. The students might need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding students what they have discussed and completed so far in this unit. The teacher will then explain that the students may continue to work independently on their rough drafts while she walks around the room to check on progress, answers any questions, and gets all previously absent students caught up on the process. The students who have received approval on their rough drafts will begin working in Mixbook on their page. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 8: The class will meet in the computer room. The teacher will bring pencils and paper. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets. The students might need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding students what they have discussed and completed so far in this unit. The teacher will then explain that the students may continue to work independently on their rough drafts while she walks around the room to check on progress, answers any questions, and gets all previously absent students caught up on the process. The students who have received approval on their rough drafts will begin working in Mixbook on their page. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 9: The class will meet in the computer room. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets. The students will need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding student what they have discussed and completed so far in the unit. The teacher will explain that the students will being working in Mixbook, if they have not already done so. They will have today and tomorrow to complete the project. The teacher will remind the students that they will be responsible for finding images and backgrounds to compliment their work and the class’ work. The teacher will remind the students that they may use Flickr or Google Images to find pictures. (All other websites must receive teacher approval.) (If the Instructional Technology Specialist is available, this would be the day that she would come to answer questions and help the students.) The teacher will then explain that the students will work independently while she walks around the room to check on progress, answer any questions, and get all previously absent students caught up on the process. The students, who have completed their project, may continue to improve their page as necessary. For the last five minutes of the session, the teacher will allow students the opportunity to discuss issues or share ideas. Day 10: The class will meet in the computer room. The students will need to bring their student prompt sheets. The students will need computer and internet access. The teacher will begin by reminding student what they have discussed and completed so far in the unit. The teacher will remind the students that they need to complete their work today. The teacher will then explain that the students will work independently while she walks around the room to check on progress, answer any questions, and get all previously absent students caught up on the process. The students, who have completed their project, may continue to improve their page as necessary. Once every page is completed, the class will discuss and approve the book. The teacher will then publish and order two copies of the book. The teacher will also send home a note about parent options to purchase the book with the information about how the parents may view the book online. Upon receipt of the purchased books, the students will present the principal with a copy for the school library.

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  • By: Kelly G.
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About This Mixbook

  • Title: Famous Missourians
  • Students will work individually or in pairs to create a web-based classroom MixBook detailing the lives and contributions of famous Missourians.
  • Tags: 4th grade, education, famous missourians, kelly gach, mixbook
  • Published: over 7 years ago

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