Enjoy up to 55% Off! Code: JOLLY Ends: 12/5 Details
Apply
  1. Help

Moldova

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

Moldova - Page Text Content

S: Moldova Scrapbook

FC: My Peace Corps Assignment in Moldova | Samuel Marcus Global Studies

1: Samuel Marcus Peace Corps Moldova | After graduating from Temple University with a degree in Computer Science, I volunteered to teach innovative teaching methodologies and inclusive practices in Mathematics for the Peace Corps. A few months later I found myself on a plane headed to Moldova to join the other 119 Peace Corps volunteers there.

2: Moldova is located in Eastern Europe. Ukraine is to the north and east. Romania is to the west and south. It is close to the Black Sea, but it is landlocked. The southern tip of Moldova touches the delta of the Danube River.

3: My village in Moldova

4: Going to the bathroom is not a pleasant experience. Here is the outhouse I am using.

5: EKKLESIA World Toilet Day is a cause for celebration in Moldova Children attending school in the small, northern Moldova village of Hasnasenii Mari have been celebrating their first toilet - and the region’s first green-tech, eco-friendly toilet, at that. The new urine diverting dry toilet (UDDT), or composting toilet, will be the first of its kind in northern Moldova – inaugurated a day | before World Toilet Day on Saturday 19 November 2011. More of the composting toilets are planned for schools in the region and are seen as a hygienic and environmentally sound toilet solution in areas where centralised systems are not realistic. They are part of a wider water and sanitation programme being rolled out in Moldova by international humanitarian agency Church World Service, in cooperation with Women in Europe for the Common Future (WECF) and local partners.

6: They are part of a wider water and sanitation programme being rolled out in Moldova by international humanitarian agency Church World Service, in cooperation with Women in Europe for the Common Future (WECF) and local partners.

7: The school where I teach is modern. It was renovated by the European Union and the United Nations Development Program.

8: The Daily O'Collegian Alumna enters Peace Corps, teaches health in Moldova By Stephanie Taylor Multicultural Reporter After two years out of college, most graduates are living in a big city pursuing their career. Jessica Kerbo, a 2009 Oklahoma State University alumna, is not like most graduates. Kerbo lives in a small house heated by a soba. She kills chickens and goats for food. Where | she lives, the roads are not paved. There is no running water, and the water she is able to get, she has to boil to get rid of the parasites in it. Kerbo graduated from OSU with a degree in physiology and a minor in chemistry and went on to work in plant genetics lab in Illinois. She is now a Peace Corps volunteer in Moldova, one of Europe's poorest countries. She teaches health awareness for grades 4th through 6th in Izbiste, a village of about 3,000 people.

9: "My degree from OSU has helped me because as a health teacher, I have to write my own lesson plans," Kerbo said. "There are few research resources here, but because of my education background, I just know it." While Kerbo's circumstances are not typical, she is also not a typical person. Her wardrobe consists of car show t-shirts and long, hippie skirts from thrift stores. She wears little | Here is an article about one of my fellow Peace Corps volunteers in Moldova! | makeup and wears her hair in fast, easy styles, said her sister, Rachel Kerbo, a senior broadcasting and PR senior. "She has a big heart," Rachel said. "She doesn't care about fashion or material things." Kerbo first heard about the Peace Corps during her sophomore year of undergrad at OSU. She thought it would be a great way to combine her love of helping others, traveling,

10: science and art. "I was intrigued with the idea but a little scared about traveling half way across the world and about what my family would say," she said. Four years later and now fluent in Romanian, Kerbo doesn't regret her decision to join the Peace Corps. "Once I got on the plane from Tulsa to Philadelphia to where I met all the other volunteers from my group, my anxiety slowly let way to bits of anticipation and | excitement," Kerbo said. "I thought to myself, ‘How is my adventure going to begin?'" Although Moldova may be extremely poor, Kerbo said it is a fascinating place with deep roots in many cultures from today and the past. Moldova is a mostly rural country roughly the size of Maryland that gained independence from the Soviet Union in 1991. She described the land as countryside rolling with green fields with sunflower fields in the summertime.

11: "I feel like Moldova is like a toddler learning to walk, making a few clumsy mistakes here and there, but slowly gaining confidence and an understanding of self as it tries to find a place in this fast paced world," Kerbo said. Almost all Moldovans speak Romanian and have vineyards because they produced wine for all of the Soviet Union before it fell. The country has a large alcoholism problem due to the lack of job opportunities, high poverty and wide acceptance of drinking. | In the city, there are many buildings and flashy billboards with advertisements for phone companies, clothing stores and political parties in an effort to modernize Moldova, Kerbo said. The villages are completely different from the city. "I think the houses look like something like Hansel and Gretel," she said. Some of her most memorable experiences in Moldova have involved the village priest, who sprinkled holy water on her laptop

12: during her first week in the village. She recently held a Halloween party for her students, many of whom had never heard of the holiday before. The village priest condemned the party, but Kerbo said about 200 kids still showed up and had a great time. Her students are a very lively group, eager to learn all they can, especially the English language. "Of the 3,000 people who live in the village, only about 3 speak English and not well," she said. "I speak Romanian | better than they speak English." Kerbo said her students are a lot more optimistic than older people in the village. Moldovans are often very passive and lack critical thinking skills or the inclination to ask questions. This comes from being a part of Soviet Union for so long and being told what to do without question, she said. "A lot of my students go home to nothing and have to teach themselves how to do their homework at the end of the day," Rachel said.

13: Kerbo recently finished work on a project called "The World Map," where her students painted a large world map on the hallway wall in order to learn geography. Before her project, the students had no idea about where countries outside of their own were located. Another project Kerbo has been a part of since her time in Moldova is called G.L.O.W., Girls Leading Our World. She helped 9th through 12th grade girls in the village lead a five-day day camp for girls grades 4th through | 8th. The program teaches girls about self-appreciation, stereotypes and future planning, Kerbo said. "In Moldova, girls are very much behind boys," she said. "They are put into gender roles and are often stereotyped." Kerbo leaves Moldova in July 2012. When she returns to the U.S. she plans to work in public health or pursue a master's program. Her goal before she leaves Moldova is to help the kids at her school be more creative, have critical thinking skills and

14: to learn basic health skills, like washing their hands after going to the bathroom. "I know it may sound corny but I joined the Peace Corps because I wanted to travel and apply my college education to something positive where I really felt I was helping others and giving back," she said. "I wanted to grow as a person." Despite the tough working conditions of no running water or indoor plumbing and parasites, Jessica is persistent and determined, said her | mother, Cheryl Kerbo. "Jessica has always had a heart for helping others and has given her all to the people of this community," she said. "She is intent on improving the lives of her students and I couldn't be more proud of her." Kerbo is currently working with other teachers to start a center for socially vulnerable kids, those kids whose parents are neglectful or alcoholics. She is writing a grant to get funding for the center.

15: Another way she is fundraising is by hosting movie nights for her students and the community. She currently uses her laptop and an old projector to play the movies, but once she is gone next July, the students won't have anything to play movies on. She is working to get a grant through the Peace Corps' website so people can donate money to the school's laptop fund. Kerbo's main focus is getting enough money for a laptop before she leaves. | "I want to give them a hope for the future," Kerbo said.

16: The traditional dresses of Moldova and Romania are similar. You can see influences from Turkish Muslims, Slavs, and Gypsies in these dresses

17: "Ma numesc Samuel Marcus, si eu sint voluntar din America, in programul Corpul Pacii." (My name is Samuel Marcus, and I am a volunteer from America, in the Peace Corps Program.) | I am learning to speak Romanian, the language of Moldova. On my first day of school, I said to my students:

18: Moldovans use animals to help produce food and for labor. People use cows to produce milk, meat, and fertilizer. The Republic of Moldova unfortunately is still lagging behind in economic development.

19: Moldovans build homes by hand. Moldovan people love to decorate their homes.

20: I came across a man fishing near his home on a lake. He is trying to catch enough fish to help feed his family. Food is not plentiful in this area of the world.

21: I also saw farmers stacking hay that will be used for feeding the cattle. Rich soil good for farming covers three fourths of the country.

22: The Milestii Mici Winery has two million bottles of its wine stored underground. It is the largest collection of wine in the world. Moldova has microclimates that are perfect for growing wine grapes. Most of the wine is exported to Russia.

23: The Voice of Russia Russians to enjoy Moldovan wine again Russia has readmitted produce from two more wineries in the former Soviet republic of Moldova. This brings the total Moldovan winemakers with Russian market OKs to 55. Russia’s chief consumer protection officer Dr Gennadi Onishchenko | announced this in Moscow Friday after emerging from talks with Moldovan wine dealers. In April 2010, Russia locked out Moldovan wine on food safety grounds. The situation has since improved, allowing the resumption of Moldovan wine import.

24: Here is my Moldovan cell phone. Moldova has the latest cell phones. MoldCell is the main phone operator in Moldova. This company started in the year 2000. MoldCell has captured 30% of the cell phone market.

25: This is what a Moldovan Visa, called an "Invitation," looks like. It takes thirty days to get a Visa. Applications are examined at the Bureau of Migration of the Republic of Moldova. Anyone who needs a visa has to present a passport, the dates he or she will be in Moldova, and the places in Moldova he or she wishes to go.

26: The 1 Leu banknote, issued by the National Bank of Moldova in September, 2010, has the national seal of the Republic of Moldova and a portrait of Stephen the Great (Stefan cel Mare), prince of Moldavia from 1457 until his death in 1504. Stephen the Great defended Moldavia from the Ottomans.

27: Komsomolskaya Pravda, Moldova: 6.8% price hike in Moldova in 2011 24 November 2011 | 17:59 | FOCUS News AgencyChisinau. Prices in Moldova have increased by 6.8% since the turn of the year. Country’s inflation in October was 1.5%, the Moldovan edition of the Komomolskaya Pravda daily writes. | Moldova is among the countries in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) with highest increase of the prices, having Belarus, Armenia and Azerbaijan atop of it. According to the prognoses of the National Bank of Moldova, the country’s inflation this year will reach 9.6%. The price of agricultural products in the country has increased by around 20% last months compared to October 2010.

28: I went to Chisinau, the capital city, the other day. I liked seeing the Holy Gates at the edge of Cathedral Park. They represent the Arc de Triomphe in Paris on a smaller scale. The government building is located across the street from from the Holy Gates.

29: Chisinau's Russian Orthodox Cathedral is located in Cathedral Park. It is one of the main tourist attractions.

30: Passersby leave flowers at the monument in honor of Stefan cel Mare, freedom fighter and patriot. These people are celebrating the anniversary of the proclamation of Romanian as the official language of the country.

31: Teenagers in the town square support the Romanian language over Russian. The Russian language was spoken officially when Moldova was part of the Soviet Union. Many young Moldovans want to maintain their culture and language and want to be part of the European Union.

33: The poem, "LImba Noastra" ("Our Language"), by Alexei Mateevici (1888-1917), is displayed in front of Mateevici's house, which is now a museum. "Limba Noastra" provides the words of the national anthem of the Republic of Moldova. The music was written by Alexandru Cristea.

34: Protests in Moldova Explode, With Help of Twitter By ELLEN BARRY Published: April 7, 2009 MOSCOW — A crowd of more than | 10,000 young Moldovans materialized seemingly out of nowhere on Tuesday to protest against Moldova’s Communist leadership, ransacking government buildings and clashing with the police. The sea of young people reflected the deep generation gap that has developed in Moldova, and the protesters used their generation’s tools, gathering the crowd by enlisting text-messaging, Facebook and Twitter, the social messaging network. | From the New York Times

35: The protesters created their own searchable tag on Twitter, rallying Moldovans to join and propelling events in this small former Soviet state onto a Twitter list of newly popular topics, so people around the world could keep track. By Tuesday night, the seat of government had been badly battered and scores of people had been injured. But riot police had regained control of the president’s offices and Parliament Wednesday. | After hundreds of firsthand accounts flooded onto the Internet via Twitter, Internet service in Chisinau, the capital, was abruptly cut off. There was no sign that the authorities would cede to any of the protesters’ demands, and President Vladimir Voronin denounced the organizers as “fascists intoxicated with hatred.” But Mihai Fusu, 48, a theater director who

36: spent much of the day on the edges of the crowd, said he believed that a reservoir of political energy had found its way into public life. “Moldova is like a sealed jar, and youth want more access to Europe,” he said. “Everyone knows that Moldova is the smallest, poorest and the most disgraceful country. And youth are talking about how they want freedom, Europe and a different life.” | Young people have increasingly used the Internet to mobilize politically; cellphones and text messages helped swell protests in Ukraine in 2004, and in Belarus in 2006. The immediate cause of the protests were parliamentary elections held on Sunday, in which Communists won 50 percent of the vote, enough to allow them to select a new president and amend the Constitution. Though the Communists were

37: expected to win, their showing was stronger than expected, and opposition leaders accused the government of vote-rigging. Election observers from the European Union and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe had tentatively accepted the voting as fair, though they expressed some concern about interference from the authorities. But the results were a deep | disappointment in the capital, where Communist candidates lost the last round of municipal elections. “In the air, there was a strong expectation of change, but that did not happen,” said Matti Sidoroff, a spokesman for the O.S.C.E.’s mission in Moldova. Behind the confrontation is a split in Moldova’s population. The collapse of the Soviet Union brought benefits to much of Eastern Europe, but in Moldova it

38: ushered in economic decline and instability. In 2001, angry citizens backed the return of Communists and their social programs. But Moldova remained desperately poor, and young people flocked overseas to work. They have looked to the West as the best path to economic stability and have defied Mr. Voronin’s government by urging closer integration with Romania. | The global financial crisis has eliminated overseas jobs, sending many of the young people back to Chisinau, their horizons suddenly narrowed, said Carroll Patterson, who is finishing his doctoral dissertation on economic changes in Moldova. “I wouldn’t necessarily call it an anti-Communist movement,” Mr. Patterson said. “This really is a generational squeeze. It’s not really the Communists versus the opposition. It’s the grandmothers versus the grandkids.”

39: The protests apparently started on Monday, when organizers from two youth movements, Hyde Park and ThinkMoldova, began calling for people to gather at an event billed as “I am a not a Communist.” Natalia Morar, one of the leaders of ThinkMoldova, described the effort on her blog as “six people, 10 minutes for brainstorming and decision-making, several hours of disseminating information through networks, Facebook, blogs, SMSs and e-mails.” “And 15,000 youths came out into the streets!” she wrote. | And 15,000 youths came out into the streets!” she wrote. The participants at that first gathering, on Monday, dispersed peacefully. But demonstrations on Tuesday spun out of control. News coverage showed protesters throwing stones at the windows of Parliament and the presidential palace, removing furniture and lighting it on fire. Riot police officers shielded their heads as demonstrators o the night.

40: pelted them with stones. The police then used water cannons and tear gas to disperse the crowd. Fires continued to burn late into the night. Valery Obade, director of the Republican Hospital, said his staff had treated 76 people for injuries. Moldova’s national television channel also reported that a young woman died of carbon monoxide poisoning as a result of a fire set in the Parliament building, but it was impossible to independently confirm the report. | Mr. Voronin issued a statement saying the leaders of opposition parties were behind the rallies, which he called “an anticonstitutional coup.” In a television broadcast, he said the protests were “well designed, well thought out, coordinated, planned and paid for.” Russia backed Mr. Voronin. Moscow’s embassy released a statement saying that “a group of militants” appeared in an otherwise peaceful

41: crowd on Tuesday, urging them to attack government buildings. The Kremlin released a statement saying President Dmitri A. Medvedev had spoken with Mr. Voronin about “the mass disorder unfolding on the pretext of disagreement with the election results.” At a news briefing, a State Department spokesman, Robert A. Wood, also expressed concern about the violence, but he said policy makers in | Washington had not yet assessed whether the elections had been free and fair. Prominent opposition leaders came out Tuesday night to say that they had not played any role in organizing the demonstrations. Ms. Morar of ThinkMoldova distanced her organization from the violence, shifting the blame to opposition parties.

42: “Our initiative group bears no responsibility for the looting that occurred,” she wrote on her blog. “The young people who we gathered stand peacefully on the square.” Mihai Moscovici, 25, who provided updates in English all day over Twitter, painted a more nuanced picture. He said the gathering on Monday night drew only several hundred people. The protesters agreed to gather the next morning and began spreading | the word through Facebook and Twitter, inventing a searchable tag for the stream of comments: #pman, which stands for Piata Marii Adunari Nationale, Chisinau’s central square. When Internet service was shut down, Mr. Moscovici said, he issued updates with his cellphone. Evgeny Morozov, a specialist in technology and politics at the Open Society Institute in New York, a group that works with democratic movements worldwide

43: and has been active in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, said Facebook and Twitter had apparently played a major role in the protests. “Nobody expected such a massive scale,” he said. “I don’t know of any other factor which could account for it.” But on Tuesday night, with main government buildings seared by fire, violence had left everyone chastened. | Mr. Moscovici said the protests were never intended to turn in that direction. “The situation got beyond any expectations,” he said. “If it would have been planned in advance, they would have used Molotov cocktails or other bad stuff. Today they didn’t have any tools to fight back. The stones they got from the ground, from the pavement.” Nikolai Khalip and Michael Schwirtz contributed reporting from Moscow, and Noam Cohen from New York.

44: Moldova Likely To Postpone Presidential Election November 15, 2011 CHISINAU -- Moldova is likely to postpone the election by parliament of a new president after no candidates registered for the vote, RFE/RL's Moldovan Service reports. The deadline for registration was November 14, and the vote was scheduled for Friday (November 18). | Tudor Deliu, who heads the parliamentary commission tasked with organizing the election, told RFE/RL on November 14 that the country's laws do not make provision for a situation where there are no presidential candidates. Deliu said he assumes the election will have to be cancelled and "the whole process will start again from scratch." The election was meant to end a deadlock which has kept Moldova

45: without a full-time president for more than two years. The opposition Communists, who were ousted from power in 2009, have blocked two attempts by the ruling Alliance for European Integration (AIE) to elect their candidate. The president is elected by the parliament, rather than by direct popular vote. The AIE holds 59 seats in parliament, two short of the 61 votes needed. | This week's election looked more promising because three deputies from the Communist Party, including former Prime Minister Zinaida Greceanii, defected earlier this month and held talks with the ruling parties about ways to break the impasse. Their votes would have given the ruling parties the three-fifths majority needed to elect a president. But the defectors reportedly could not agree with the AIE on an acceptable candidate.

46: Under Moldovan law, the presidential election can be repeated only once. If the second attempt fails, the country must hold early parliamentary elections.

47: 60,000 Demonstrate in Moldova Capital Updated: 11:11, Sunday December 11, 2011 Some 60,000 demonstrators have taken to the streets of the Moldovan capital Chisinau to protest against the government just days ahead of the country's presidential election. The demonstration on Saturday was in support of the communist | opposition, against the pro-European government. Protesters said living conditions had plummeted in the ex-Soviet country of 3.5 million, compared with neighbouring Romania. The country goes to the polls on Friday to elect a new president. The pro-European government has been in power since 2009, when it took over from the communists.

48: Talks about Moldovan Separatist Region to Resume on Nov. 30; US, EU, OSCE to Take Part By Associated Press, Published: November 22 CHISINAU, Moldova — Negotiations on the separatist region of Trans-Dniester will resume next week in Lithuania, five years after they stalled, Moldova’s prime minister announced Tuesday. Vlad Filat’s office said he and separatist leader Igor Smirnov decided to | restart the talks after a meeting Monday in the separatist town of Bender, mediated by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.Russia, Ukraine, the European Union and the U.S. will also take part in the Nov. 30 talks to be held in Vilnius. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said during a visit to Moldova Tuesday that Trans-Dniester, which is supported but not recognized by Moscow, should have a special status within Moldova, a former Soviet Republic of some 4.1 million.

49: Lavrov called for a “long-term solution” for Trans-Dniester, which broke away from Moldova in 1990 and fought a war with Moldovan forces in 1992 that left 1,500 people dead. Discussions over the status of Trans-Dniester were suspended in 2006 after Moldovan authorities and the separatists failed to agree on anything.

50: My favorite stamp has the seal of the Republic of Moldova on it.

51: Alma-Ata Declaration (1991) Preamble The independent states: The Republic of Armenia, the Republic of Azerbaijan, the Republic of Belarus, the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republic of Kyrgyzstan, the Republic of Moldova, the Russian Federation, the Republic of Tajikistan, the Republic of Turkmenistan, the Republic of Ukraine, and the Republic of Uzbekistan; Seeking to build democratic law-governed states, the relations between which will develop on the basis of mutual recognition and respect for state sovereignty and sovereign equality, the inalienable right to self-determination, principles of equality and noninterference in the internal affairs, the rejection

52: of the use of force, the threat of force and economic and any other methods of pressure, a peaceful settlement of disputes, respect for human rights and freedoms, including the rights of national minorities, a conscientious fulfillment of commitments and other generally recognized principles and standards of international law; Recognizing and respecting each other's territorial integrity and the inviolability of the existing borders; Believing that the strengthening of the relations of friendship, good neighborliness and Mutually advantageous cooperation, which has deep historic roots, meets the basic interests of nations and promotes the cause of peace and security; Being aware of their responsibility for the

53: preservation of civilian peace and inter-ethnic accord; Being loyal to the objectives and principles of the agreement on the creation of the Commonwealth of Independent States; Are making the following statement;... | The Minsk Agreement was created on December 8, 1981. It helped create an independent Commonwealth of Independent States from Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus. On December 21, 1991 the Alma-Ata Declaration expanded to the Soviet republics, with the exception of Estonia.

54: Moldova: Country Strategy Paper 2007-2013 This Country Strategy Paper (CSP) for the Republic of Moldova covers the period 2007 - 2013. Assistance to Moldova over that period will principally be provided under the new European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (ENPI) which is being established to provide assistance for the development of an area of prosperity and good neighbourliness involving the European Union and the partner countries covered by the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP). The principal objective of EU-Moldova cooperation at this stage is to develop an increasingly close relationship between the EU and Moldova, going beyond past levels of cooperation, to a deepening of political cooperation including in the area of foreign and security policy and in the resolution of the conflict in Transnistria, and to promote economic growth and

55: poverty reduction on the basis of the EU Moldova Action Plan and the Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (EG-PRSP). | The Country Strategy paper covers the period 2007-2013 for the Republic of Moldova. It is an agreement between the European Union and Moldova. The main objective is to develop political cooperation in the area of foreign and security policy. The Country Strategy Paper 2007-2013 is important to Moldova because it describes how the European Union is helping Moldova to develop.

56: Works Cited Front Cover - Toff, Ken. "Mayanot 98." Facebook. N.p., July 2011. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . Samuel Marcus in Jerusalem, Israel. p. 1 - Ashley, Jenna. "Mayanot 98." Facebook. N.p., Nov. 2011. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . Samuel Marcus walking down the aisle of an airplane at John F. Kennedy Airport, Queens, New York, on July 10, 2011.

57: p. 2, top - "Moldova: Location Map." Permanent Mission of the Republic of Moldova to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations in Geneva / Embassy to Swiss Confederation. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Nov. 2011. It is important to understand Moldova's location within Europe. Moldova is at the eastern border of the European continent, between Ukraine to the north and east, and Romania to the south and west. It is landlocked, except for some coastline in the south along the delta of the Danube River that runs into the Black Sea. p. 2, bottom - Republic of Moldova: Official Website. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Nov. 2011. . The official government website of the Republic of Moldova offers information on its economy and on tourism.

58: p. 3 - Malashock, Yoel. "Nkosi's visit." Yoel Malashock. Facebook, 18 Nov. 2010. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . This Facebook page is from a Peace Corps volunteer serving in Moldova. It records a visit to the house where he was staying by his fellow Peace Corps volunteer, Nkosi. There are many photographs of his house and his village. p. 4, top and bottom - "Back in Chisinau." Jennifer in Moldova. N.p., 12 Oct. 2007. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . A blog written by a Peace Corps volunteer to Moldova. The posts are from August 17, 2007 to May 13, 2009. There are many photographs of her life in Moldova, including the outhouse she had to use while living there.

59: p. 5 - "World Toilet Day is a cause for celebration in Moldova." Ekklesia: A New Way of Thinking 19 Nov. 2011: n. pag. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . Children in the Moldovan village of Hasnasenii Mari celebrated their first toilet. It is located in the village school. It is a composting toilet, or Urine Diverting Dry Toilet (UDDT), that does not require flushing with water. Church World Service, a humanitarian agency, donated the toilet to the Moldovan school. p. 7 - "Two Social Institutions from Anenii Noi District Were Renovated with the assistance of the European Union and UNDP Moldova." United Nations Development Programme: Republic of Moldova. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), 22 July 2011. Web. 25 Nov. 2011.

60: presscentre/2011/22_07_2011_Anenii_Noi/index.shtml>. The United Nations and the European Union have been involved in many development projects in Moldova. In particular, they have renovated many school buildings. Taylor, Stephanie. "Alumna enters Peace Corps, teaches health in Moldova." p. 8 - The Daily O'Collegian. Oklahoma State University, 27 Nov. 2011. Web. 28 Nov. 2011. . Jessica Kerbo, a graduate of Oklahoma State University, is a Peace Corps volunteer in Moldova. She eats chickens and goats that she kills herself. Her house does not have running water. She lives in the town of Izbiste, and teaches health awareness to students in Grades 4 through 6.

61: p. 16 - Traditional Dress-Girl-Ales. N.d. Euroheritage.net. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . The traditional dresses of Moldova and Romania are similar. You can see influences from Turkish Muslims, Slavs, and Gypsies in these dresses. p. 17 - Yoelim. Weblog post. An American Lawyer in Moldova. N.p., 24 Mar. 2011. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . This blog was written by a Peace Corps volunteer to Moldova. His posts are from May 2010 to March 2011. They describe his arrival in Moldova, his adjustment to life in a small village (no indoor bathroom, no dryer for the laundry), his host family, his work, and his daily routine. He is Jewish, and it also describes what it is like for him to be the only Jew in the village.

62: p. 18 - Rural Moldova. N.d. Rural Moldova. 2009. Photograph. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 7 Oct 2011. Web. 7 Oct. 2011. People use animals to help produce food and labor. People use cows to produce milk, meat, and fertilizer. Moldovans build homes by hand. Moldovan people love to decorate their homes. The country of Moldova unfortunately is still lagging behind in economic development. p. 19 - "Picture of Brightly coloured house in Butuceni with corn (Butuceni, Moldova)." Travel Adventures. traveladventures.org, n.d. Web. 25 Nov. 2011. . Moldovans build homes by hand. Moldovan people love to decorate their homes. This photograph is of a house in the village of Butuceni, near Orheiul Vechi.

63: p. 20 - Fishing. 2005. culture gram. Web. 24 Oct. 2011. . This image depicts a man fishing near his home on a lake. He is trying to catch enough fish to help feed his family. Food is not plentiful in this area of the world. p. 21 - Farmland in Moldova. N.d. World Book Advanced. Web. 10 Nov. 2011. . Farmers are stacking hay that will be used for feeding cattle. Rich soil is good for farming and covers three-fourths of the country.

64: p. 22 - Bottles of wine from the Milestii Mici Winery in Moldova. N.d. Milesti Mici. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . The Milestii Mici Winery has two million bottles of its wine stored underground. It is the largest collection of wine in the world. Moldova has micro-climates that are perfect for growing wine grapes. Most of the wine is exported to Russia. p. 23 - "Russians to enjoy Moldovan wine again." The Voice of Russia. N.p., 4 Nov. 2011. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . Moldova exports most of its wine to Russia. However, in April, 2010, Russia banned wine coming from Moldova because of food safety concerns. These concerns have been resolved. Fifty-five Moldovan wineries are now approved to export wine to Russia. Two wineries were just added to the list.

65: p. 24 top - Advertisement. Moldcell. S A "Moldcell", 17 Nov. 2011. Web. 5 Dec. 2011. . MoldCell is the main phone operator in Moldova. This company started in the year 2000. MoldCell has captured 30% of the cell phone market in the Republic of Moldova. It uses the GSM format, and offers text messaging (SMS), wireless internet (WAP - internet), and 3G speed. p. 24 bottom - Cell Phone Operator. Sept. 2009. Cell Phone Operator. 2008. Photograph. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 10 Nov 2011. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Oct. 2011. . MoldCell is the main phone operator in Moldova. This company started in the

66: year 2000. The phone company is a great source of communication for the country of Moldova. MoldCell has captured 30% of the cell phone market in Moldova. p. 25 - "Visa Regime." Advertisement. Marisha.net. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . This is what a Moldovan Visa, called an "Invitation," looks like. It takes thirty days to get a Visa. Applications are examined at the Bureau of Migration of the Republic of Moldova. Anyone who needs a visa has to present a passport, the dates he or she will be in Moldova, and the places in Moldova he or she wishes to go.

67: p. 26 - One Leu Banknote. N.d. Banca Nationala a Moldovei. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . The 1 Leu banknote, issued by the National Bank of Moldova in September, 2010, has the national seal of the Republic of Moldova and a portrait of Stephen the Great (Stefan cel Mare), prince of Moldavia from 1457 until his death in 1504. Stephen the Great defended Moldavia from the Ottomans. p. 27 - "Komsomolskaya Pravda, Moldova: 6.8% price hike in Moldova in 2011." Focus Information Agency. N.p., 24 Nov. 2011. Web. 25 Nov. 2011. . The National Bank of Moldova forecasts that annual inflation in Moldova will be 9.6% this year.

68: Among the countries that are members of the Commonwealth of Independent States, Moldova has had one of the largest increases of prices. Agricultural prices have increased 20% over the past year. p. 28 - The Holy Gates. 2008. culture gram. Web. 24 Oct. 2011. . Chişinău's Holy Gates are located at the edge of Cathedral Park. They represent the Arc de Triomphe in Paris on a small scale. The government building is located across the street from from the holy gates.

69: p. 29 - Orthodox Cathedral. 2008. CultureGrams. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. . The city of Chisinau's Russian orthodox cathedral is located in Cathedral Park. It is one of the main tourist attractions. p. 30 - National Hero. 2009. Collection of CultureGrams. Culture gram. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . Passersby leave flowers at the monument in honor of Stefan cel Mare. He was a freedom fighter and patriot. The people are celebrating the anniversary of the proclamation of Romanian as the official language of Moldova.

70: p. 31 - Teenagers in the Town Square. 2009. Collection of CultureGrams. Culture gram. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . Teenagers in the town square support the Romanian language over Russian. The Russian language was spoken in the Soviet Union and in Moldova when it belonged to the USSR. Moldovans want to maintain their culture and language and not be interfered with by other countries. p. 32 - "Din activitatile desfasurate de Filiala 1 Botosani a SCMD." Botosani-Sindicatul Cadrelor Militare Disponibizate in Reserva si in Retragere. N.p., 23 May 2010. Web. 23 Nov. 2011.

71: din-activitatile-desfasurate-de-filiala.html>. The poem, "LImba Noastra" ("Our Language"), by Alexei Mateevici (1888-1917), is displayed in front of Mateevici's house, which is now a museum. "Limba Noastra" provides the words of the national anthem of the Republic of Moldova. The music was written by Alexandru Cristea. p. 34 - Barry, Ellen. "Protests in Moldova Explode, with Help of Twitter." The New York Times. N.p., 7 Apr. 2009. Web. 25 Nov. 2011. . Young people in Moldova are frustrated with the Communist government in Moldova. They used their cell phones to gather

72: for a demonstration in the center of Chisinau. The demonstration turned violent. Older people support the Communists and the Soviet Union. Younger people look to Europe for greater freedom and economic prosperity. p. 44 - "Moldova Likely To Postpone Presidential Election." Radio Free Europe Radio Liberty. N.p., 15 Nov. 2011. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . Moldova has not had a full-time president for over two years. On November 18, 2011, the Moldovan parliament was supposed to vote for a new president, but nobody registered to be a candidate for president. The election will be cancelled. The deadlock is between the Communist

73: Party, ousted from government in 2009, and the Alliance for European Integration (AIE), which is currently in power. Nobody could agree on a candidate for president. p. 47 - "60,000 Demonstrate in Moldova Capital." Sky News 10 Dec. 2011: n. pag. Google News Timeline. Web. 10 Dec. 2011. . Before the presidential elections Moldovans who support the Communist Party demonstrated in Chisinau. They said living conditions had deteriorated in Moldova, in comparison to Romania. They want to win control of the government, which has been in the hands of the party who supports Europe.

74: p. 48 - The Associated Press. "Talks about Moldovan separatist region to resume on Nov. 30; US, EU, OSCE to take part." The Washington Post. N.p., 22 Nov. 2011. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . In 1990, the Trans-Dniester region broke away from Moldova. The separatists fought a war with Moldova in 1992. In 2006, talks were held to decide the status of Trans-Dniester, but nothing was resolved. On November 30, 2011, there will be a new set of negotiations between Moldova and Trans-Dniester, held in Lithuania. The participants will include Russia, Ukraine, the European Union, and the United States.

75: p. 50 - "Stock Image of Moldova Stamp." Advertisement. Yay Micro. Yay Image Bank, 2011. Web. 25 Nov. 2011. . This stamp from Moldova from 1993 shows the seal of the Republic of Moldova, an ox's head with a star between its horns; a rose to the right; a crescent to the left, within an eagle. This seal has been used since the fourteenth century. p. 51 - "Appendix C -- Belarus and Moldova The Alma-Ata Declaration." The Library of Congress: American Memory. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Nov. 2011. . In the Alma-Ata Declaration, December 21, 1991, eleven former republics of the Soviet Union

76: declared their independence, and the formation of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Moldova was one of those republics. p. 54 - "Moldova: Country Strategy Paper 2007-2013." Kooperation International. N.p., 1 Jan. 2007. Web. 21 Nov. 2011. . The Country Strategy paper covers the years 2007-2013 for the Republic of Moldova. The goal of Moldova is to become an economic power through membership in the European economic union. Their goal is to reduce poverty in Moldova.

Sizes: mini|medium|large|gargantuan
Default User
  • By: Samuel M.
  • Joined: about 6 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 0
No contributors

About This Mixbook

  • Title: Moldova
  • Tags: None
  • Started: about 5 years ago
  • Updated: almost 5 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order