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Urbanization

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Urbanization - Page Text Content

S: Urbanization by Cherjuan Robertson

FC: Urbanization

1: NASA Satellite Image in 1988 and 1996, The Goddard Space Flight Center. | The Effects of Urbanization On China

2: United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs, Population Division. World Urbanization Prospects, the 2011 Revision, New York 2012. | % Of Population Change Due To Urbanization

3: WWW.MSNB.MSN.COM | Waste Produced From an Urban Community

4: www,infoservemedia.com

5: WWW.infoservemedia.com | View of a Latin American Urban Community

6: The United Nations, world urbanization Prospects. The 2005 Revision. PRB.ORG | Growth of Urbanization

7: Frank Ippolito, 2009. U.S. Department of Agriculture. WWW,usgs.gov

8: Urbanization the human population has lived in rural settings through most of history.The world’s population, however, is quickly becoming urbanized as people migrate to the cities. . In 1950, less than 30% of the world’s population lived in cities. This number grew to 47% in the year 2000 (2.8 billion people), and it is expected to grow to 60% by the year 2025.The definition of an urban area changes from country to country. In general, there are no standards, and each country develops its own set of criteria for distinguishing cities or urban areas. A city is generally defined as a political unit, i.e., a place organized and governed by an administrative body. A way of defining a city or an urban area is by the number of residents. The United Nations defines settlements of over 20,000 as urban, and those with more than 100,000 as cities. The United States defines an urbanized area as a city and surrounding area, with a minimum population of 50,000. A metropolitan area includes both urban areas and rural areas that are socially and economically integrated with a particular city. n the year 2000. This number is expected to grow as the population increases in the next few decades. It is predicted that by the year 2015, 50 megacities will exist, and 23 of these are expected to have over 10 million people.

9: The rapid growth of urban areas is the result of two factors: natural increase in population (excess of births over deaths), and migration to urban areas. Urbanization usually accompanies social and economic development, but rapid urban growth on today’s scale strains the capacity of local and national governments to provide even the most basic of services such as water, electricity and sewerage. Squatter settlements and over-crowded slums are home to tens of millions, like the favelas that cling to the hillsides of Rio de Janeiro and the tombs used as homes by tens of thousands in Cairo’s "City of the Dead". In some developing countries, notably in Africa, this growth reflects rural crisis rather than urban-based development.The rapid growth of urban areas is the result of two factors: natural increase in population (excess of births over deaths), and migration to urban areas. Urbanization usually accompanies social and economic development, but rapid urban growth on today’s scale strains the capacity of local and national governments to provide even the most basic of services such as water, electricity and sewerage. Squatter settlements and over-crowded slums are home to tens of millions, like the favelas that cling to the hillsides of Rio de Janeiro and the tombs used as homes by tens of thousands in Cairo’s "City of the Dead". In some developing countries, notably in Africa, this growth reflects rural crisis rather than urban-based development.

10: According to the Global Biodiversity Assessment, species have been becoming extinct since 1600 at 50-100 times the average estimated natural rate, while the extinction rate is expected to rise to between 1,000 and 10,000 times the natural rate. The Global Biodiversity Assessment identifies the five major causes of biodiversity loss as the fragmentation, degradation, or outright loss of habitats (through the conversion of land for agriculture, infrastructure, or urbanization, for example); overexploitation; the introduction of non-native species; pollution; and climate change, Some positive initiatives have also been identified, however, such as the establishment of protected areas, habitat regeneration, and measures that mitigate pressures from human activities.

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  • By: Cherjuan R.
  • Joined: about 4 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 2
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About This Mixbook

  • Title: Urbanization
  • Urbanization is the increased development of urban communities, that depletes the available rural areas. This influx depletes natural resources, animal habitats, and causes an excessive amount of waste.
  • Tags: urbanization, urban, resources, rural area, waste
  • Published: about 4 years ago

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