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Cline Crane Family

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Cline Crane Family - Page Text Content

S: Crane Family History

FC: Our most treasured family heirlooms are family memories. | Crane Family

1: Cline and Zula Crane | Earnest Cline Crane born January 28,1894 | Zula Blanche Adams born September 16, 1901

2: Jim Cliff Benny Cline | A.D. Charles Oliver Sophia Otto Tressie | Charles Oliver Crane | Sophia Victoria Holliday | 1863-1940 | 1863-1955 | Earnest Cline Crane was the fifth child of eight children. | Zula Blanche Adams was born to William Edmond Adams and Amanda Candice Pace Adams | Married February 4, 1887 in Newton County, Mississippi

3: Charles Oliver Crane was a well respected Mason having played a large part in getting a boys and girls home established in Meridian, Mississippi. He drove a Model T and was in high demand as a speaker at Masonic functions. He had just returned home from a three day trip to Meridian. When he arrived he walked down the hill to check on a tenant family that lived on the land. From there he walked to the back side of the place to visit Cline and Zula. Blanche was just about to graduate from high school and remembers it well. He came in and passed around a large supply of candy to the children and then sat and visited with Cline and Zula for quite some time. He walked back to his house where Sophie had his lunch ready. After eating he told Sophie that he felt like taking a nap, something he did quite often. She went to the garden and was planting onions when she told a young black girl who was helping her to go up to the house and check on Mr. Crane. She came running down the hill and said “You’d better come check; I ain’t never seen Mr. Crane get in bed with his shoes on!” They raced up the hill and there he was with his high-top black lace up boots still on and stone dead! There was a small table by a chair in the room and he had been reading his Bible and marked the verses he read when he decided to lay down. His last act on earth was to read his Bible. He was born on Jesus’ birthday and died at Easter.

4: After C.O died Sophia went to live with Aunt Tressie in Union, Mississippi. During the summer she would stay a month with Cline and Zula. | A.D. Cline Benny Cliff Jim | Tressie and Sophia Crane | Sophia never cut her hair and she would wear it in a braid at night. During the day she would twist it up into a bun. The Crane girls loved to brush her hair.

5: W.W. Adams Family Reunion in 1924. All of the family was present except Zula. She was pregnant with James.

6: Corporal Company E 114 #1605278 Tennessee | Earnest Cline Crane

7: April 6, 1917 Congress declared war on Germany. Eleven days later, Earnest Cline Crane enlisted in the United States Army in Pascagoula, Mississippi at the age of 23. After a year of training, he left the United States on August 29, 1918. He arrived in France September 12, becoming one of over 4 million American soldiers, sailors and marines that served their country in World War 1. On September 26, 1918, more than one million United States troops fought in the the last great battle in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Two months later the war was over as the Central Powers surrendered on November 11, 1918. Earnest Cline arrived back in the United States December 31, 1918 and came back home to Conehatta, Mississippi.

8: Zula often accompanied her sister Cannie when she went on her outings with Bennie Crane. When Cline got out of the army in January 1919, his brother Bennie asked Cline to come along to a church singing and meet Zula. It was love at first sight and the two were married a year later, February 1, 1920. | Zula Blanche Adams | Earnest Cline Crane | Married February 1, 1920

9: Deemer Tornado When Cline and Zula were first married they moved to the town of Deemer, Mississippi so Earnest could work with his brother Jim Crane at Deemer Logging Camp. The newlyweds rented a room in a home that had been converted to a boarding house. The room was too small to hold the trunk of belongings that Zula carried with her, so she had to store the trunk in the sitting room next door. On the morning of April 20, 1920, Ernest and Jim headed off to the logging camp at 5:00 AM to begin their ten hour shift. On a usual morning Zula would get up early and prepare breakfast for Earnest and send him to the camp with his lunch. On this particular morning Zula did not get up early and see him off. When she awakened she heard the landlady yelling for her to close the kitchen door because the wind had begun to pick up. Zula commented that she could hear the sound of a train. The landlady handed her baby to the black housekeeper, and held on to her other child. The four of them along with Zula were all huddled in the sitting room when the tornado struck the home. The storm ripped the roof off the house along with all the chairs and the linoleum rug. After a short while, Zula looked around the room and saw that everyone was safe. Zula then looked down and saw that she had a tree branch stuck in her leg, but she recovered without any permanent damage. The only piece of furniture left in the room was Zula’s trunk. The next day they read in the newspaper that the tornado had swept across the area and demolished the Deemer lumber camp, near Philadelphia, Miss., leaving twelve dead, in its wake. Earnest and his brother Jim were both safe after the storm. From that day on Zula was deathly frightened of storms.

12: Married October 21, 1944 | Melvin and Blanche Dubard

13: Ron Bob Don David

14: CPL 405 AAF Bomb Squadron WWII | Sept 28, 1922 Feb 17, 1944

16: Married October 8, 1944 | James and Ruth Crane

17: Chuck Mike Sandy

18: Married May 31, 1949 | Truett and Anna Bufkin

19: Linda Sherry Sheila

20: Married May 1, 1949 | James and Inez Blackburn

21: Cindy Teri Tommy

22: Married December 24, 1960 | Calvin and Jeanne Crane

23: Kelly David

24: Married June 25, 1955 | George and Laura Strother

25: Debbie Tim Todd

26: Married July 1960 | William and Ellie Crane

27: Wayne Donna Janet

28: Married October 12, 1968 | Jim and Margie Rainwater

29: Stacie Michelle Michael

30: Married March 5, 1961 | Larry and Pat Cochran

31: Kim Angie Matt

32: It’s hard to imagine anyone who loved fishing more than Cline Crane. Almost every day, weather permitting, he would set off to the pond to wet his line. A favorite spot for fishing was the spring fed creek that ran across his neighbor's pasture land. On this particular outing James, Earl and George went along on the adventure. Earl had just arrived home from the Navy from his tour in Japan and was eager to bring home a string of fish for supper. They had set out a line of hooks up and down the creek on Mr. Stamper’s land and they were going to check them, hoping to strike it rich. | Fishing with Cline Crane

33: When they arrived at the bend in the creek they checked the drop line that they had tied off on one of the tree limbs. Since they were fishing for catfish, they put a weight on the line to make sure it would stay in the deep part of the water. The water in this spot was cool, clear and was about 20 feet deep. Cline could see movement on the line so he thought for sure he had snagged a big one. Instantly, he sprang into action, stripped down to his birthday suit and climbed up on a log that went out over the fishing hole. As he got closer he saw the line had become tangled in the brush and he thought the hook was hung on a log. Everyone knew that Cline Crane hated to lose a hook. He would do anything to salvage that sacred hook and this day proved to be no exception. While holding on to the log he began to run his toe down the line hoping to free the hook from the log. When the water was about waist deep, his toe came to an abrupt halt. Backing his toe away from the hook Cline began to lift the line from the water. He shouted for James to get his 22 rifle. As the hook approached the surface you could see a large dark shadow. When the shadow emerged from the water the mouth of a loggerhead turtle was clamped tightly onto the hook. Cline straddled the line to get a firm hold. Holding the turtle between his legs he shouted for James to shoot the turtle. Sizing up the situation, James was hesitant to take the shot. Shouting again, Cline told James to take aim and shoot the !@#?! turtle so he could free the line. Reluctantly, James pulled the trigger striking the turtle in the middle of the shell. Cline drug the turtle up onto the bank of the creek and happily unhooked the line. James, Earl and George were of no help in this struggle to the shore since they were laughing so hard. Even though they did not catch any fish, it was a successful outing. Cline had his hook, Mr. Stamper had a freezer full of turtle meat, and James, Earl and George had one whopper of a fish tale that they would never forget.

40: Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus It was Christmas Eve and Cline and Zula were in town buying last minute Christmas presents. They left Blanche, Earnest, James and baby Anna home with a babysitter, the grandmother from the end of the road where it met the main road. Blanche was only ten or so and was convinced that if she turned her back on the babysitter then she’d no longer have a baby sister. She thought the old lady would make off with the baby so she kept a watchful eye on her. Darkness fell and the sitter ushered all the children to bed and made them say their prayers. Blanche slipped out of bed and hid to keep an eye on things. Along about midnight Santa and Mrs. Claus came through the front door laden with presents and who was there to greet them but little Blanche. Zula shouted “What are you doing up at this hour?” where upon Blanche spilled the beans about the kidnapping baby sitter. Zula told her it served her right to have her childhood fantasy spoiled and it was no one’s fault but her own... then she swore Blanche to secrecy.

41: Crane Heroes When Cline and Zula lived in Conehatta in ’27 or ’28 they lived in a house on the back side of Grandpa Crane’s place. The house was built of green pine lumber sawed on the site by Cline and relatives. A big event for the family was wash day. The washing of clothes took place on Saturdays a few hundred yards from the house where a spring gushed from a hillside. They had rigged a half-barrel below where the water came out of the ground and the water flowed into the barrel and then overflowed into the stream. They got their cooking water from the barrel and washed clothes below the barrel further down the hill. One Saturday Blanche had been sent with James and Ernest to go down to the spring to fetch water. Each child had a bucket of water and was going back up to the house when they saw a small black boy, a mere toddler, who belonged to a young girl who lived out on the road where the children caught the school bus. As they were climbing through a barbed wire fence with their buckets of water, they heard a strange noise. They looked down the hill towards the spring and saw the boy’s feet sticking up out of the barrel of water. He had fallen head first into the barrel and couldn’t get out! They rushed back down the hill and snatched him out of the water by his feet. Water poured out of his mouth and nose and they got him breathing again! They dropped their buckets of water and rushed him to his mother. From that day on the grateful grandmother of the boy, who owned the house at the road, allowed all the Crane children to wait for the school bus in her house.

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  • Title: Cline Crane Family
  • Crane Family History
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