Up to 50% Off + MORE! Code: TREAT Ends: 10/24 Details
  1. Help

Copy of Grandmas album for Larry

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

Copy of Grandmas album for Larry - Page Text Content

S: Alice Harris Family Photo Album

FC: Alice Harris Family Photo Album

1: This is the oldest picture in Grandma Alice Harris’ photo album. I am sure she is pleased that it is the first, it all started here. The photo album these pictures were in went to about the late 70’s. Some pictures were added from later dates to pay tribute to her great grandchildren. | Soon after grandma died, I (Stacey) had a dream of her. In that dream I asked her what Heaven was like. She said she could not begin to tell me, but she wanted to let me know that she is writing a book. I think this may be that book. The book is written in her voice, so any first person is her speaking. The stories were written or transcribed as she told them. | Martha Reeves-Crawford Born February 23 1884 in TX. Mother of Alice

2: Alice Mae Crawford age 3

3: I played the harmonium and my mom played the violin. I knew an old man that had a cat with 5 legs and 6 feet and people would pay to hear me play and see his cat. I also played for prisoners in the jail house and made lots of money. My dad was put in jail for bootlegging and I went to play for the prisoners and my dad was being sweet and said, “Give me a kiss, girl,” and I said, “I won’t kiss you until you are out of this place”. | My mom dying was the one day I will never forget. I remember my father crying in the barn and telling me “Our momma's gone.” I ran into the house and lifted the corner of the cover and kissed her feet. I ran back out and told my dad that she wasn't gone, she was still on the bed sleeping. She died giving birth to my little brother, Archie, when I was 4. Archie died 4 months later. | Every time I had my picture taken I had to show my feet. My mother always said she loved my feet. My grandma made me a little red dress and bought me a pair of shoes. I had my picture taken with my dad and without the shoes. My sister, Marylou, wouldn't give me that picture with my dad. | When I was about 3 years old, at Christmas time my dad brought in 3 dolls - a mama and 2 babies. He gave them to me before Christmas because he didn't believe in Christmas. My mom was upset with him and bought me a rag doll from a peddler for Christmas day. That was the most I ever got as a kid. | My dog was a shepherd dog name Shep. I had 2 pet squirrels I rescued from a tree my dad cut down. They were named Bunny and Bonny. They would climb up my clothes while I was cooking and hold out their hands for food. | My grandma was cutting up a chicken and I ran out and asked my dad what part he wanted. He said, "You go in there and tell her I want the whistler." I told her that Papa wanted the whistler and she started laughing and said, "He don’t want that piece, that’s the back end of him". | Alice Harris unknown boy | Before she died my mom wanted some potato soup. My grandma made her a pot and before it was done she died and my grandma went out and threw the soup out the back door, pot and all. I loved potato soup and would think of my mom every time I ate it. | 'Bootlegger" | "My momma always loved my feet" | "Our momma's gone" | "Potato Soup" | "Which part do you want, the whistler?" | "Christmas Dolls" | "Pets"

4: At age 7 I started washing dishes and during recess at school I ran home and hung out the laundry. I then delivered the clothes to the people my grandma did laundry for. I had to clean 21 rooms at our boarding house before school and fix lunches for the boarders. | When I was a little girl I loved playing with dolls and trying to sew. My grandma made quilts and wouldn't let me in her scraps. I used to sneak pieces and make my doll's clothes. When we moved, I buried the doll clothes cause I didn't want to get into trouble. | Alice | "Washing dishes" | "I buried them in the backyard" | Alice lower right hand corner. Grandmother Ella Mirar behind her. The rest are unknown.

5: I stayed in school until the 7th grade. One of the boys, Willie McFarland, was stuck on me and wrote notes to me and threw them on my desk. I would brush them off, I wasn’t interested in boys. The teacher would try to make me sit by him and I wouldn’t. The teacher called the principal and the principal stood up for me and did not make me sit by him. | As a child my hair was down past by bottom, so I sat on it all the time. My grandmother would braid it in tight braids that made my eyes slant, you can see that even in my pictures at 4 years old. As soon as it was vogue to bob my hair, I did. My grandma did not like it but I loved it. I loved being in style and it made me feel free of a heavy burden. | "I hated old, long hair" | "Three-legged boys"

6: Aunt Alice was a Pentecostal preacher and my grandma, Martha, was also, but she said she could not get the Holy Ghost. When I was little, my grandma dressed me up and sent me off to church. There was a Baptist church on one corner, a Presbyterian church on the other. I heard the Presbyterian Church singing, “Will There Be Any Stars In My Crown?” and the Baptist Church singing, “No, Not One” so I went to the Presbyterian Church. I started to attend a church of Christ in 1930 with my neighbor Bertha Robins. | I would comb his hair and he would mess it up and I would slap him. When he remarried my stepmother was mean to me so I stayed with my grandma. I was very hurt that I “lost” my dad. I was 10 the last time I saw my dad until I was married and living in Las Cruces in my thirties. He worked in the saw mill and sent my grandma money. | "My Grandma and the Holy Ghost" | "I just loved my father..." | "Chester and the evangelical parakeet" | Darol Ady was a preacher and he had a parakeet named Perry that he taught to say many things. This parakeet quoted many Bible passages and even knew everyone's name in the family. One day, Chester was eating dinner at the table and the parakeet was out of its cage. The parakeet said, "Hi, Chester". Now Chester, startled, said, "Hi, Perry". The bird then walked back and forth and said, "Have you been baptized?" Chester replied, "No". Perry cocked his head and said, "Shall be damned. Shall be damned." Two weeks later, Chester Harris was baptized.

7: Alice in the early 1920’s | from left Billy and Alice | Ma's Potato Soup | Melt a Tablespoon of butter in a medium pot. Saute in the butter, 1/2 cup of onion, teaspoon of black pepper and 1 garlic clove minced. Cut up 4 large potatoes and add to the pot with just enough water to cover the potatoes. Boil until the potatoes are tender but not completely mushy. Mash potatoes leaving them in chunks. Add a teaspoon of salt and up to a can of evaporated milk. You can add fried sausage and a little kale to the mix if you are in the mood for meat.

8: Chester Mansford Harris November 4, 1898 | Chester came to board with us at the boarding house my Grandma owned. He was working in the oil fields. The first time I saw him he was black as could be with oil. When he cleaned up I thought, "Oh, he's so pretty." When it was time for Chester to leave, he came in and said he was going to go back to his father and asked if I would write him. I said, "Yeah, I'll write you a great long letter". I was left handed and when I did write him I wrote backwards so he would have to put it in front of the mirror to read it. | "Oh, he's so perty"

9: Another boy in the boarding house complained and said I made Chester big lunches and gave him little ones. I told him that was because he was not Chester. The next day I put a door knob in the boy's lunch so it felt bigger. | "The Door Knob"

10: Chester's mom was Hattie Bell Branson Harris. When I married Chester she became my mom and I loved her and all of his family. I went to town with Hattie one day and we started to go into a dressing room to try on a dress. Hattie said there was someone in there, I told her there was not. She walked in and went right up to the mirror and said, “How do you do.” She was so embarrassed and told me not to tell that on her. I told her it was too good to keep. | Chester’s father was Newton Jasper Stonewall Jackson Harris “ | Alice, Chester, Newton Jasper, Hattie | It wasn’t too long after that I saw a big beautiful red poppy growing in the field and I went to pick it. I got up to it and it was a rooster's comb. Hattie was with me and I said, "You don’t need to tell that on me," and she said, "No, that’s too good to keep." She told everyone and they laughed at me then. | "How do you do, my name is Hattie" | "Don't tell that on me"

12: Chester 1910 | Chester 1915 | Chester loved joking around. One day he went into a bar and sat down. There was a drunk sitting at the bar. He saw a tack on the floor and tacked a 5 dollar bill to the heel of his shoe and went to the bathroom. While in there he took the 5 dollar bill off his shoe and put it in his pocket. The old drunk was watching his shoe and knew that it was not on his shoe anymore and beat it to the bathroom. He didn’t find it there, but while he was in there Ches stuck the bill back on his shoe, left the bar, walked down the street, and the old guy took after him. He just knew maybe he’d lose that money at any time. So Ches stopped and put his foot up and took that bill and told the old boy, “Well, better luck next time”. | Chester and his partner Paul were sitting at a café where a bunch of reporters had come in to eat. Chester turned to Paul and said, “That’s too bad about that Vidoc caving in, isn’t it? It just went down with a big crash.” The men jumped up and ran off and Ches and Paul left real quick before they came back. | "The Vidoc" | "The five dollar bill and the drunk"

13: Chester with friend Cecil. Cecil was blinded when someone threw acid out of a door and accidentally hit him in the eyes. | Bill LaPorte and Chester Harris

14: Before Chester and I were married, we were never allowed to be alone together. We always had a chaperone, even just going to town to get ice cream. When we married, we went to a dance hall with some friends of ours and left pretty quick. We liked being alone together more and enjoyed each other's company | James and Velma LaPorte | Chester and Alice Harris | 1925

15: I wanted to get married on my birthday, September 15th. When I married Chester he couldn’t get into town until the 17th. I wanted to be married on my birthday so badly I just changed my birthday to the 17th. I didn’t tell anyone until I was about 88 years old. I thought everyone would just hate me for that. | Alice and Chester Harris 1922 | Chester was not fond of my Aunt Alice because she was not kind to me. So, as a result, he would not call me Alice. Instead, he called me by my given name, Allie. When we married he would not let me put Alice on our marriage license so it shows my name as Allie Mae. | "Married on my birthday"

16: I moved around a lot between Texas and Oklahoma. I lived in Durant, OK and Dennison, TX which are 20 miles apart. My Grandma had a boarding house in Drumright, Ok and that’s where I met and married Chester. We moved to Wetumka, OK. My Grandmother was going to come with me but my Aunt ran off and left her two little boys so my Grandma had to stay and help Uncle R.C. raise them. | Hattie | Ella Mirar Gibson-Reeves. | My Grandma said she would not have let that girl take her picture with her if she had realized her knees were showing like that. | Henrietta Gazaway-Branson, She lived to be 107 years old | Hattie, Alice, Josie, Glen. child Phyllis | Chester with siblings Josie, Virgil, Velma and mother Hattie Belle | Hattie with second husband, she remarried at the age of 80 | Hattie | Alice, Chester and Henrietta Gazaway?

17: My mother sewed a lot and she used to send me to the store for thread. One time I bought candy instead because they didn’t have the tread. I told my Grandma I bought candy. My mom called out, “Where’s my thread?” I said, “They didn’t have any." She said, “Where’s my nickel?” I said to my grandma, "I gotta go to Huncles' (R.C.) barber shop and get a nickel." He gave me one and said, “Here’s her old nickel”. I ran home and plunked it down on my mom’s sewing machine and said, “Here’s your old nickel!” | R.C. Reeves | Aunt Alice Reeves with brother R.C. | When my mother would get after me about anything huncle would put me on his shoulders and run off with me. | "Here's your old nickel"

18: The pictures on these pages were sent for the book by Billy La Porte. These were his mother Velma's few pictures that were not destroyed in a fire. | Phyllis, Hattie, Josie, Mary Katherine, Chester, Maxine, Alice and Velma | Grandpa and Grandma Harris, Josie, Henrietta Gazaway, Velma, Jasper Harris, Hattie,Virgil and unknown boy. Chester Harris at the end.. This was taken on the Harris farm in a turnip patch, about 1910. | Jasper Harris, Velma and Hattie

19: Unknown, Velma, Hattie, Josie, Chester in back, Alice and Virgil | Hattie Belle Branson | Velma, Virgil, Hattie, Josie and Chester | Mary Katherine and Billy | Josie, Velma and Hattie | Velma, Hattie and Josie

20: Josi, Virgil, Eula Virgils wife, Velma,VMarJean | Velma "Pevine" Harris

21: Velma, Mary Katherine, Kathleen, Glena Joyce. | Josie Harris | Harris siblings Chester, Velma, Virgil, Josie | Betty LaPorte, Velma and Mary Katherine | The LaPorte family. William, Velma and Mary Katherine | Mary Katherine, Billy and Velma | Josie

22: Mary Katherine, Velma's daughter | Billy, Velma's son | Kathleen and Glen Poole, Josie's children | Glena Joyce | Marjean, Virgil's daughter | Mary Katherine | Billy | Billy

23: Marylou and Leroy Crawford. Half-sister and half-brother to Alice | Marylou and Leroy | Marylou Crawford, husband Lon Hicks, and baby Lois | Marylou and Lon | Marylou and Lon | Marylou and Lois | Refugio, Marylo's son | Lois | Leroy Crawford | Marylou and Lon

24: When we moved to Las Cruces, Chester and I got into a fight. I went into the bedroom and started packing my bags and he asked where I was going. I said, “I’m going home”. He said I didn’t have a home to go to. I said, “I’m going home to your mother and she has already written me and said I could come home.” He straightened up after that. | Chester, Maxine and Alice 1930 | Maxine 2009 | Chester’s sister, Josie, lived in Las Cruces and said it was the most beautiful place. Ches came to Las Cruces and lived for 3 months and loved it too. When I came out I did not love it. It was winter and everything was dry. The old houses had canvas ceilings and I thought it was cement and was afraid it was going to fall on us. I grew to love Las Cruces and never wanted to leave it. | "I'm going home to your momma"

25: Little Jimmy’s dad was a truck driver. His mom died and when his dad came back he didn’t want the baby. The baby was bounced around from person to person. My neighbor took him for one night and couldn’t take care of him. I took him to the doctor and the doctor threw his pencil down and said “So you’re the 12th mother.” I told him to just give me a chance. I took him home and took care of him. It took me a week just to get the rust off of his little wrists. Once he got healthy the neighbor wanted him back and I told her she couldn’t have him. Later his dad married a very sweet woman who loved Jimmy. By law I could have kept him, but I couldn’t do that to them. | When we lived on Las Cruces Avenue, Lettie Tuttle married and gave birth to Michael. She separated from her husband and came to live with us for 3 years. Mikey called her and me both Mommer and she told him to quit calling her Mommer. He said, “OK Lettie” and from then on I was Mommer and she was Lettie. Chester decided Lettie was not the best role model for his girls and he told her, in front of Mikey, that she needed to leave . When Mikey heard that jumped in Chesters lap and grabbed his face between little hands and said, “Daddy". "You is my daddy, ain't you?” Chester said, "You win boy". | Maxine with Jimmy 1931 | Phyllis, Mikey and Maxine 1943 | Mikey grown up and mother Lettie | Phyllis and Mikey | Mikey | "Little Jimmy" | "You is my daddy, ain't you?"

26: Chester Mansfield Harris | "Depression Days" | In 1928, Chester's father had died and the bank had taken the farm he grew up on, so Chester decided to move to Las Cruces. He had to figure out a new way to make a living. He bought and studied books on how to repair refrigerators. He became known as the best refrigerator mechanic in Las Cruces, El Paso, and all of southern N.M. He worked at that profession until they sealed the units, after that he and Mr. Taylor partnered in the refrigerator rental business. In the 1950's he bought a piece of property and opened a hamburger stand. He loved that hamburger stand and named it "The Thrifty King". He sold his burgers 6 for a dollar, and for people who did not have a dollar he would feed them a burger anyway. Terry had a snowcone stand outside, Maxine and Phyllis both made money running it as well. ChesterHe was forced by Urban Renewal to relocate his business because of the new downtown project. They told him they were not going to put a post office where his property was because they would have to pay him for that, however they did and the post office stands on his property to this day. | "My Little Girl Hasn't Eaten In Days" | One day Chester took Maxine to a restaurant in town when she was very little. The waitress was new and did not know him. He told her they were hungry and had no money and his little girl hadn't eaten in days. She went to the back to get her boss to agree to give them some food. The boss looked out and said, "Oh, that's just Chester up to no good".

27: "Hot Summer Nights" | Chester loved practical jokes and making people laugh. He also loved telling stories; fanciful made up tales where children were whisked off to other worlds. Many summer nights were spent on the front porch with the neighborhood kids gathered around for story time. | "Storytime" | The desert nights were cool outside but could be very miserable inside without the best air-conditioning. We often slept outside in the summer under the stars. That was the best of memories. | "Letting it all hang out" | For whatever reason, Chester did not like to wear shorts under his pants. He and Mr. Taylor's business was on one of the main streets in Las Cruces. Chester climbed a ladder to put up a sign. Just as he reached up to hang the sign his pants fell down. Cars passing by were honking and he couldn't let go of the sign. He was yelling for Mr. Taylor to take the sign, but Mr. Taylor was rolling on the ground laughing. Mr. Taylor said it served him right for not wearing shorts and not buckling his belt tight enough. Ma was always telling him to pull up his pants.

28: Maxine was so proud of this tricycle, even though it did not have any rubber on the wheels | Chester always dressed Maxine up like a boy. He would take her downtown and she’d dance on the street and make money. She’d say, "You want to see me dance?", and she would do a little jig dance. He was so proud. She didn’t have any hair when she was born and she was 4 years old before she had enough hair to comb.

29: We were married 7 years before Maxine came along. We came to Las Cruces when she was 2. After another 7 years we had another little girl, Phyllis.

30: Maxine with niece Jeanie Wood | Maxine, friend Irene and Phyllis

31: Maxine Lavesta Harris | Maxine with pipe | Maxine, Brenda, Terry and Phyllis | Aunt Gail Wood, Maxine and friends skipping school | 12 years old | 30 years old

32: Phyllis and Alice | Phyllis at Catholic school

33: Hattie Phyllis Harris

34: Maxine

35: Phyllis

36: Maxine and Doyle 1946

37: Maxine, Doyle and Murlene | Doyle’s sister Barbara Wood | Maxine and friend Murlene

38: Maxine's high school days | Best friend Gail Wood. Later wife to Don Wood | Maxine and Gail back of high school | Clyde, dad's cousin. Maxine, Don and Gail, Doyle | Las Cruces High School, later Alameda Jr High.

39: Phyllis' high school days

40: Brenda and Terry Wood | Phyllis, Maxine and Terry at Murlene's baby shower | Brenda 4 years, Terry 7 years

41: Brenda, Maxine, Doyle, Phyllis and Terry | Terry, Brenda and Doug Wood, Gary Ady | Doug and Doyle

42: Doyle 10 in Arizona | Doyle and brother Don | Mother Maude Molder | Doyle with baby Pat Coughlan | Marika, grandpa Doyle and Sammy | Doyle and Terry

43: Doyle Lee Wood | Barbara Wood | Jean Wood | Don and Doyle Wood | Gary, Stacey Mayo, Doyle

44: Young family: Maxine, Doyle Brenda and Terry | Barbara and Terry

45: Terry, Chester, Alice | Phyllis and Terry | Terry | Terry | Terry in outfit Barbara gave him | Chester | Doyle | Terry | Terry and Jeanie Wood | Me with Sarah Wood | Me with Terry Wood | Me and Phyllis | Terry with black eye and Maxine

46: Terry Lee Wood

47: Brenda Kay Wood

48: Doyle Lee Wood

49: Brenda, Doug and Stacey Wood

50: Doug Wood | June 11, 1956

52: Darol, on right, with brother Richard "Dick" | Twins: Carol and Darol, with brother, Dick | Carol, Darol and Arlis in Elmer

53: Darol Ady | Darol squatting, Terry in center holding something. the rest are the Doorbandts, neighborhood friends. | Carol and Darol | Christine and Mathew Ady

57: & | D | P

58: Young family: Darol and Phyllis with Gary and Sharon

59: Gary Ady | Sharon Ady

60: Danny, Sharon, Gary, Randy and Phyllis | Gary | Timmy | Tammy | Sharon | Danny

61: Timmy | Danny | Danny | Danny | Timmy, Danny, Tammy, Sharon and Gary

62: Randy | Tammy | Tammy | Randy "Rainwater" | Tammy, Patti and Becky | Timmy | Gary | Randy | Timmy

63: Randy | Randy, Danny, Sharon and Gary | Gary | Darol being silly | Newspaper article fun in the snow | Phyllis | Timmy | Timmy | Tammy

64: Gary and Sharon: Danny, Timmy and Randy (bottom) | Timmy and Tammy | Timmy | Patti and Tammy | Sharon, Tammy, Timmy, Patti and mom Phyllis. 1969, Nampa, ID | Gary, Danny, Sharon and Randy: Okie kids | Randy and Sharon in Tulsa | Perry, the talking parakeet

65: Randy and Becky | Phyllis and Becky | Darol and Becky | Timmy, Tammy and Randy | Phyllis | Tammy and Timmy | 7 of the 8 Ady kids dressed for a talent show | Patti

67: Brenda with baby Patrick 1970 | Little Pat, Coby and Big Pat 1975 | Hawaii 1970

68: Coby Callaway

69: I made all the outfits Brenda is wearing in these pictures. .

70: Stacey playing with Doug June 1966 | Stacey With father Doyle Wood 1966 | November 1964 3 months old | When Maxine was pregnant with Stacey I was reading a Gasoline Alley comic strip and one of the characters was named Stacey. I liked it and so that is how she got her name.

71: Stacey | Kathleen | Wood

72: Robert Wood | Robert Wood | Pat, little Pat, Terry, Shawn and Robert | Brenda, Pat, Chester, little Pat | Little Pat | Robert and Shawn | Shawn and Little Pat | Robert and Shawn | Shawn and Robert | Terry and Robert | Robert | Shawn, Terry and Robert | Little Pat and Chester | Terry and Robert Wood | Rayne, Shawn and Little Pat | Terry and Marla | Terry

73: Large photo: Doug, Brenda, Little Pat and his father, Pat Coughlan. Top inset: Alice, Pat and Brenda on Brenda's green limousine. Middle inset: Pat Bottom inset: Pat and Stacey. More like brother and sister than aunt and nephew

74: Gary Upchurch married Maxine and joined our family on December 10th of 1977.

75: Gary and Maxine Upchurch | Gary, Maxine and Stacey | Phyllis, Alice and Maxine | Darol, Phyllis and Maxine

76: Terry Lee Wood

77: Brenda Kay Wood

78: Douglas Mansford Wood

79: Stacey Kathleen Wood

80: Gary Gene Ady

81: Sharon Kay Ady

82: Daniel Dean Ady

83: Darol Randal Ady

84: Timothy Jon Ady

85: Tammy Sue Ady

86: Patti Lynn Ady

87: Rebecca Dawn Ady

88: Ma taught her children with wit and wisdom. She would sing songs and had many sayings we attribute to her. She never spanked: if you did something that warranted a punishment, which was rare, she would have you go out and pick a nice green switch from the tree. If you brought her one that was not good she would make you go get a better one. If she got a good one she would keep it on the refrigerator. The following are a few of her sayings that had profound meaning for those she said them to: | “Every tub stands on it’s own bottom” “Feeding Coxes' army” “Then there were 9 of them” “I wouldn’t trade you for prime property in Jiles County Arkansas” “Your full of Holy Wakashay” “You're on your first legs” “Three legged boys” “Hello hungry, glad to meet you. I’m Alice” “Happy as if I had a hair in my biscuit” If you were pouting you would inevitably here Ma singing, “Nobody likes me, everybody hates me, I’m going off to eat some worms. Big ones, fat ones, little bitty skinny ones. I’m going off to eat some worms." In the morning she would wake you by singing, “School days school days, dear old golden rule days. Reading and writing and arithmatic, talk to the tune of the hickory stick.” Then you would hear, “Next stop Rincon”.

89: Ma was a wonderful seamstress and she made a living doing alterations her whole life. She worked for the cleaners, private individuals and department stores until she was well into her 80’s. She made all of her daughters' clothes, many of her grandchildrens' clothes and all of Brenda’s stage clothes. She also loved to tat and when Stacey was 6 she asked Ma to teach her to tat. Ma said, "No". She had tried to teach so many people and no one was able to do it. Stacey loved watching her hands fly through the thread and was quite taken with it. Ma had a butterfly that was tatted by a friend of hers when she was in her 90’s and blind. This butterfly was what inspired Stacey to continue asking. When Stacey was 12, Ma finally taught her. She not only learned it but also re-created the butterfly that she so loved. Stacey taught Sarah Wood to tat and gave her a shuttle and the butterfly that she had recreated to hopefully inspire her. | Stacey's Tatting | Ma's Tatting | The Butterfly from the story

90: Nampa, Idaho | The Ady Bunch (Stacey in center) | Homedale, Idaho | And then there were ten

91: Woody Woody bunch

93: Benjamin Johnson. 25 August 1985 | Allison Hammond | Hammond | Hammond | 12a. Tammy Ady | i. Kelly Christopherson | ii. Jodi Christopherson | 12b. Gary Ady | i. Ashley Ady | 12c. Danny Ady | i. Amber Ady | ii. Ashley Ady

94: Great Grand children on the Wood side: Terry Wood: Shawn and Robert Wood, Shawn and Rayne Wood and Sarah Wood. Brenda Wood: Patrick Coughlan, Elysia Coughlan, Jed Lemmons, Marika Coffman and Samuel Coffman Doug Wood: Scarlett Wood and David Wood Stacey Wood: Jordan Mayo | Doug and David | Doug, Nancy David | Scarlet and David | Rayne, Shawn, Sarah | Robert Miranda Leslie | Terry | Rayne Sarah Mika | Scarlett | Brenda | Stacey Jordan Jerry | Pat Sasah Brenda Sophie | David Jordan | David | Sarah | Robert

95: Mika | Elysia Mika Jed | Mika | Sarah | Rayne Shawn | Patrick | Mika Doyle | Rayne | Sarah Jed | Jordan | Jed | Jed | Sarah | Sammy | Elysia | Sarah | Jordan | Elysia Stacey | Scarlett and Ma | Mika David

96: Great Grandchildren from the Ady side: Gary Ady: Ashley Ady Sharon Ady: Sharla and Ben Johnson Danny Ady: Amber and Ashley Ady Tim Ady: Emily and Mary Ady Tammy Ady: Kelly and Jodi Christopherson Patti Ady: Jessica, Nick and Allison Hammond Rebecca Ady: Makayla and Tyler Danley | Ben and Sharla | Jessica Allison Nick | Ashley | Jessica Nick | Sharla and Ben | Kelly | Amber | Emily

97: Nick | Allison | Amber | Makayla and Allison | Ashley | Emily | Mary | Sharla | Jodi and Kelly | Ben | Jessica | Jessica | Emily | Sharla and Ben | Tyler

98: Great Great Grandchildren | Camryn | Camryn | Kalani | Kalani and Celeste | Celeste | Sasha | Jonathon | Miranda | Sasha Amanda Daniel Sophie | Sasha Sophie | Sasha pat | Sam Sasha | Davis | Sash Daniel | Celeste and Kalani | Sophie | Brenton

99: Alice Mae Crawford-Harris born 9/15/1905 Me | Maxine Lavesta Harris-Wood born 5/10/1928 Daughter | Brenda Kay Wood-Coffman born 5/2/1951 Granddaughter | Patrick George Coughlan born 1/21/1970 Great Grandson | Alexsondra Kathleen Coughlan born 2/6/1991 Great Great Granddaughter | Sophia Madeleine Szczerba born 4/28/2006 Great Great Great Granddaughter

Sizes: mini|medium|large|behemoth
Default User
  • By: Stacey M.
  • Joined: over 7 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 11
  • Default User
    • By: Larry J.
    • Contributions: 28 photos , 8 pages

About This Mixbook

  • Title: Copy of Grandmas album for Larry
  • Tags: None
  • Started: about 6 years ago
  • Updated: almost 6 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order