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S: My Family Report Esther Rimler, 2011

FC: Esther Rimler My Family History Grade 8 - 2011 | "Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow."

2: Like branches on a tree, our lives may grow in | T h e R i m l e r' s

3: different directions yet our roots remain as one. | T h e R o s l e r' s

4: Me, Myself, and I | I was born on Monday, June 30, 1997 (Chof Hey Sivan, Tof Shin Nun Zayin) in Beth Israel, Manhattan, N.Y. I weighed 9.8 pounds, was 22 inches tall, and had brown hair and blue eyes. It was the day after Mommy and Tatty got their first cell phone. I am named after Bubby Esther Langsam. Bubby Esther was very special because she was very instrumental in smuggling the Jews out of Russia. In world war two the KGB were looking for Bubby, because they were very mad that she saved so many Jews. The thing that I remember most is when I used to go to Bnos Menachem. My teacher was Morah Raizel, I was saying Baruch Shem... out loud because I thought it was funny. Morah Raizel looked at me and said, “ Esther, do you know why we say Baruch Shem... quietly. When Moshe went to Shamayim he stole this Tefila. When someone C''V steals something, they don't want anyone to know, so they keep it a secret. That's why we say Baruch Shem... quietly, we don't want the Malachim to know that we stole it. I am the second to oldest out of six. There is one boy and five girls.

5: I resemble tatty in many ways, (even my back problems, which I wear a shoulder brace for, and the bad migraines that I get,) except my profile and laugh which is like Mommy's. I can't say that one parent is more strict then the other parent. They work as a team to discipline and to praise me and my siblings with love and care. So that we may grow into responsible, loving, caring, and kind, girls with good middos I am very fun to be around and very loud, I also strive hard to reach my goals, if someone will ask me to do something I won't stop till it is finished. I am also very adventurous and ambitious to learn new things. I'm not scared to try new things, in fact, it I'm always excited and can't wait to try it. This trait is inherited from Mommy and her siblings. When I was in second grade, I was Talmidas, my parents were really proud of me, so they got me a present, which I had up until last year. I love to read, eat, take charge, and do crafts. My favorite sports are running, biking, swimming, and kickball. When I am bored I read or eat. I do not get allowance, I earn all my money by babysitting or by Chanukah gelt. That money goes straight to my bank account, because I do not like to use any of my money. But when I need something my parents usually get it for me. Because I am the oldest girl I have many responsibilities. For example, I do a lot of babysitting, help bathe my little siblings, help serve and cook supper, and getting everyone into bed. I also cook, bake, clean, and help out with homework. My favorite subjects are math, history, aybn, and historia. Science and grammar will go on the bottom of the list. My favorite colors are purple and pink. The best food ever is Mommy’s homemade food, nosh, and most fruits and vegetables. I usually wear a long or short skirt with a tee shirt, I also like to wear whatever is in. Since I was two my family has been going upstate to Monticello, to a bungalow colony called Kol Tov. They stopped just two years ago. For the past two summers I have been going to Camp Gan Israel, Detroit. The best part of it was biking, swimming in the new pool, going on trips, and meeting new friends. My family takes a lot of trips we go to amusement parks, beaches, water parks, ice skating, snow tubing, museums, aquariums, libraries, and parks. And sometimes we just go in the car not knowing where we are going. My family and I have been to lots of places, we have been to Israel once, by my brother's bar mitzvah. We have also been in Montreal a lot; we go at least twice a year being that my mother's family is there.

6: We were also in California twice, Florida twice (I was there once, the second time my family went I was in camp. The first time we went by plane the second time my family took a road trip there,) and Iowa once. My family has driven to New Jersey, Philadelphia, Toronto, Niagara Falls, and Pennsylvania. The best gift that I ever received was my diamond heart ring, which I got for my Bas Mitzvah. When my family went to Israel for my brothers’ bar mitzvah Bubby and Zeidy Rimler came along with us. I admire Zeidy Rosler. He is a very special person, Zeidy has a heart of gold, when you come to him for advice he never turns you down. Zeidy wakes up at 4:00 a.m. every single morning in order to learn, then he goes to the mikveh, davens, and then spend the rest of his day learning. When I am done with schooling I wish to get married, and raise a frum Jewish family. I hope to be like my mother and teach my kids the same way she does. I look up to Mommy. She teaches me how a Jewish girl is supposed to act. Mommy guides me carefully and helps me solve any problems that I have. Mommy is there for me and protects me from any bad influence. When I was 18 months old Mommy needed to pick up my brother Mendel (also known as Emmy). She came to my crib to wake me up from my nap. When Mommy came into the room she noticed that I wasn't breathing and my face was blue. She called Hatzala right away, and I was rushed to the hospital. After a week of tests I was finally able to go home. This incident helps me appreciate life and shows me the wonderful miracle that Hashem has shown me and my family.

8: Mommy | Mommy was born in Royal Victoria, Montreal, Quebec, on February 19, 1973. Mommy is the youngest of six she has one brother and four sisters. First goes Yitzchok, then Rivky, Shulamit, Leah Devorah (Wawa), Nechama and last but not least Mommy. Mommy went to Bais Rivkah throughout her schooling years. My mother was raised by my Bubby and Zeidy who still live in Montreal. My Bubby and Zeidy were always very involved in Mivtzaim, so growing up my mother was always surrounded by many frum and non frum people in her house. They also had weekly shiurim in their house which Mommy was always very involved in. When my mother was in second grade, Bais Rivkah Montreal, her sister, Shulamit, was her teacher. Mommy went away to many summer day camps as camp counselor. Mommy even opened her own camp in Montreal and ran it for 2 years. Mommy went for 2 years of seminary to Bais Chayah Mushkah in Montreal that had just opened up. After Seminary my mother became a teacher for second grade in Bais Rivkah Montreal. After that Mommy moved to California where she taught in Bais Chaya Mushkah, for second grade and pre-1a. All of my Mothers students still remember her as their "BEST” teacher. A lot of them still keep up with my mother. Mommy married Tatty in Montreal in 1995 on Tu B’Shvat and moved to New York. Mommy taught in a few different schools in Brooklyn. Mommy had my brother Emmy in March,1996 and then started teaching seventh grade boys in Kings Bay Yeshiva for a year until she had me. When Mommy had me she started a new career. Now Mommy is a graphic designer, she designs a lot of stuff, for example, invitations, ads, fliers and newsletters. Mommy also designs the N’shei Chabad Newsletter. Mommy is also a housewife and a mother; she cooks, cleans, helps us with homework, and takes care of us when we are sick. Mommy volunteers and likes to get involved in our schools and wherever people ask. Mommy cooks meals for mothers that just had babies or if someone is not feeling well. Mommy also buys us anything we need, and when we have a problem we can always count on Mommy to help us. | To the world, you are my a mother, but to me, you are the world.

9: Man is the head of the family, woman the neck that turns the head.

11: Tatty was born in Lefferts General Hospital, (that building is now Bais Rivka) Brooklyn N.Y. on July 31 1969. Tatty grew up in Crown Heights and went to Lubavitcher Yeshiva, where his father was the principal. Tatty was the second to oldest out of six. As Tatty was growing up he loved electronics, he created a bunch of things, and for example Tatty made an electronic traffic light for his little brother, Heshy. When Tattys family moved he practically tore down the house and redid it with his younger brother, Yitzchok. He also installed an analog clock in the wall of his house. When Tatty got married he owned a store on Ave. J called Sterling Electronics. Now Tatty does Home Automation. He installs video cameras, intercoms Shabbos timers, lighting control, and the like. Tatty has to travel a lot, he goes to Florida at least once every two months. He also goes to places where there are shows (they show all the electronics that just came out). Tatty is also in Hatzala. When my family goes to different places, Tatty might have to leave in middle and go on a call. Or by the Shabbos table Tatty sometimes leaves, and sometimes even by the Seder tatty has to leave. Tatty helps us a lot with homework, if we need something Tatty is always there for us and helps us in any way that he can. | Tatty | A father is someone who wants to catch you before you fall but instead picks you up, brushes you off, and lets you try again. A father is someone who wants to keep you from making mistakes but instead lets you find your own way, even though his heart breaks in silence when you get hurt. A father is someone who holds you when you cry, scolds you when you break the rules, shines with pride when you succeed, and has faith in you even when you fail...

12: Mommy an

13: d Tatty

14: Emmy | Menachem Mendel, known as Mendel (The family and really close friend call him Emmy), was born on March 13, 1996 (Chof Beis, Adar). Emmy is named after the Rebbe. He is the oldest in the family, Emmy is fourteen and in ninth grade. He is my favorite and only brother. When he turned thirteen his Bar Mitzvah was in Israel. Emmy loves to read and listen to sports on the radio. He is in school all day and comes home late at night, by the time he gets into bed it’s very late. Even though Emmy goes to sleep very late he still wakes up every single morning at 5:30 in order to go to the mikva.

15: Riki | Rivka, known as Riki was born on December 20, 1999 (Yud Alef, Teves). Riki's named after my maternal grandfather's mother. She is the third to oldest, and is right under me. Riki is very smart, cute, and friendly. She always strives hard to reach her goal. She is eleven years old, and in sixth grade Bais Rivkah. Riki loves to read and is very good at writing, if I ever need anything or any help I can rely on Riki for her help. She is very reliable and trustworthy. She helps out a lot at home and is always happy with what she has.

16: Basya Perel, known as Peri was born on April 2, 2001 (Tes Nisan). She was named after my maternal great-grandmother. She is the third to youngest, and nine years old in fourth grade. Peri is very charming, wonderful, artistic, and very intelligent. She loves to joke around, and play games with anyone who is there. Peri is very studios and always gets good marks on tests. Whenever there is a problem in school she always talks it over with someone so she can do the right thing. Peri never will do the wrong thing and will always listen to you, if you ask her to do something. She always helps around in the house, she is mommy's right hand girl when it comes to helping around in the house. | Peri

17: Bryna | Yenta Bryna, known as Bryna was born on July 27, 2004 (Tishaa B’av). She is named after my paternal great-grandmother. She is the second to youngest, she is six years old and in first grade. Bryna is very cute, smart, and playful. She loves to act like the older kids in the family, whatever we do she also has to do. She loves “babysitting” and helping everyone. Whenever she has a chance to do something she will grab it right away, not giving anyone a chance to do it. She is also very into her schoolwork, and will try not to miss a day of school even if she is sick.

18: Chaya | Chaya Mushka, known as Chaya was born on July 28, 2007 (Yud Beis, Av). She is named after Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka. Chaya is the youngest and the cutest kid in the family. She is three years old, this is her first year in school. She loves to play with all of her new friends and loves to go to school. She loves telling over what she learned in school, and loves showing off everything that she knows, and makes sure everyones attention is on her. Chaya also loves to boss everyone around, she makes orders and expects everyone to follow.

19: Our most treasured family heirlooms are our sweet family memories.

20: The Rosler Side

22: Interveiw with Zeidy Rosler, taken over the phone in the week of Parshas Vayikra, Alef-DaledAdar Beis | 5.Where did you live as a child, (big city, town or village)? Describe the life and neighborhood there? I lived in a city but a very small city; there were stores, schools, shuls, and a main street all in one town. Across the street from my house there lived a big rich goy. I never saw him, he left his house in a car and his house was surrounded by trees. In my city the houses weren’t next to each other like they are in Crown Heights, by us we were very far apart from each other, it sort of looked like a farm, because there was a lot of land separating all of our houses. Everyone in our neighborhood was Jewish besides for a few people. Even though basically everyone was Jewish we still never really associated except for when we were in shul. When I would come home from school I would eat supper and go straight to bed, so even if I wanted to play with the children I couldn’t. I only knew my cousins and Zeide, we occasionally went to visit them. 6.What was your apartment or house like when you grew up, how many bedrooms and bathrooms did you have? What was your bedroom like? We had two bedrooms in my house, one of the rooms was like a dining room. There it had two beds against one wall, a couch on the other wall, and shelves on the third wall. In the middle of the room there was a table which came from the kitchen that’s where my family ate. The second room was the kitchen. In the kitchen there was a wooden stove, in the middle of the kitchen was a table with benches around it. I slept in the kitchen room, there were three people sleeping in my bed, two people were at the head and one was at the feet. In the winter when the house was not heated I would go to my father’s bed and sleep with him, I would give him my head and he would warm it up. We had a few cabinets in the house and in those cabinets were food, tools, and clothes. We also had a fridge to store our food. We had no sink in the house every time we were thirsty we had to go to a pump and shlep a pail of water home. We also didn’t have any bathrooms in our house, we had a shack out of the house, it was a good walk to get there, and it was more like an outhouse. In our garden we had fruit trees one of the trees was a plum tree, we used to pick the plumbs and make plumb jam, it would take a few months because we had to open each plumb clean it and mash it. | 3.Where were you born? I was born in Szolos, Czechoslovakia. 4.How many children are in your family and what number child are you? There were five of us in my family; there were four boys and one girl. | 1.What is your full name Tzvi Yaakov Rosler 2.Who were you named after, is there anything special about you first or last name? Do you know the meaning of your last name? I don’t know who I am named after or the meaning of my last name. My name is special because it’s my name. | 7.Describe the basic mode of transportation in the area you grew up in? We only walked, we didn’t even have a horse or buggy.

23: 8. Tell me about you parents, where were they born, what memories do you have of them? My father was very strict, he always wore a jacket and a hat. By us lunch was supper. We had a big meal and everyone would sit around at the table. On Tu B’shvat my father gave us all bananas to say a shehechianu on. My mother knew how to make something from nothing, she would boil potatoes, and the water that was boiled the potatoes became a soup. I thought we had a beautiful life, I have no idea where my mother was born. My mother had a sister in America but she passed away before I had the chance to ask her. 9.How did your family earn money? How did they compare to others in the neighborhood-richer, poorer, or the same? My father had a hardware store, my family was very poor, we were so poor that if I needed money I would go ask my father and he would go to the neighbors store to get money. On Purim I would give shalach manos and got some pennies, I would give it to my mother to buy things. In those days the Jewish people were not rich, some made a living, but they were still poor, there was only one rich Jew. Even though my family was very poor we were still a family like a family is supposed to be. My bar-mitzvah was a very simple one, it was just a few cookies. One year on my birthday I got a present in a brown paper bag from my mother, it was just a few candies and yet I was so happy. My summer shoes also had to last through winter, if snow would get into it you would have to shake it out. Not only that but if I needed a new suit, my mother would go to the tailor and he would flip the suit inside out. 10.Did you know your grandparents, where were they born, and what do you remember about them? Yes, I knew my father’s parents. We would go to his house for Shabbos but not to eat. I don’t know where they were born, I don’t even remember him saying "how are you." 11.What can you tell me about your family farther back than your grandparents? I have no idea, I can’t say anything. 12.Is there anything else you can share with me about your family history (any special stories, unusual events, or famous people)? There are no famous stories, but I have a story that’s my story. I was playing soccer with my friends, one of the boys there pushed me and I landed on my hands and knees. My knees landed on a stone, and I fainted. I woke up and found myself at the schools nurse. I wasn’t in school for the next month. One day I was on my way to the doctor and I just fell on my knees and fainted. My mother carried me and I woke up in the doctor’s garden on a bench. Till today I have a mark on my knees. 13.What is the earliest memory you have of your childhood and how old were you at the time? I remember how every Thursday I would stay home from school to wash the wooden floor in my house in honor of Shabbos. After it was washed and cleaned I would buy this yellow powder mix it into water and spill it all over the floor. This would make the floor look very shiny and give it a new look. Every day when my father would come home for lunch and after lunch it was his job to broom the kitchen floor. 14.What were you like as a child? What did you like to eat? What did you do for fun? What are your favorite games, sports, books, or hobbies, and what did you do for entertainment as a teenager? I was a very good boy, whenever my father called my name there was no “what” or “I’m coming,” I would go right away, if I didn’t I would get a potch. I had a friend by my bar-mitzvah, we decided to bike to a village, it was a very long ride. When we arrived at the village we were exhausted, but we still had to get back. Because we were so tired we slept by a friend. The next morning when we were heading back my pedal broke, I managed to bike to the next village. We went to a repair man

24: who could not fix it. Instead of fixing it, he put a rod, I managed to bike back with one pedal. When I got home my feet were in pain, and I was exhausted. My father saw me and asked me to clean out the gutter. Even though I was so tired I did it without complaints. I liked to play soccer, we didn’t have a ball so we made a ball out of shmates, we would kick it to the roof and it would fall down, then we would call out someone’s name and they would have to catch the ball. I liked all food but bean soup. My mother would cook beans and with the water that cooked the beans she made a soup from it. I couldn’t not eat the bean soup, if I didn’t eat it I would’ve gotten smacked. So I had no choice to eat it. On Friday by the Shabbos meal my Bubbe bought a chicken or goose. There wasn’t enough for five people plus my parents and my Bubbe so we each got a very small piece. The problem was that after shul my father would bring home two guests. So we would have to pretend we don’t want the chicken. I liked the white part of the chicken, I would shred it and it looked like I had more. 15.What do you remember about the time before you went to school? I went to cheder at three and at two I was at a kindergarten. One day when I was in Kindergarten my mother went away for the day when she came back,( till today I don’t know where she went) my mother got me a brown leather hat with a button on top. I really didn’t like this hat. I couldn’t imagine wearing it, nobody had a hat like this. My mother put it on me and took me to kindergarten when she left I ran back home- it was across the street- and I threw it into my neighbors back yard. When I came home after school my mother asked me where it was and I told her that I threw it in our neighbors garden. She sent me to get it, the hat was gone. Boy did I get it from her. 16.What kind of school did you go to, what was your favorite and least favorite subject? Were you a good student? I went to a Jewish school, but it was a mixed school. I didn’t like any one of the subjects more than the other. I think I was a good student. 17.What are some vivid memories of your elementary school years? I got a book by Hungarian writer, I was so happy I went up to the teacher and kissed him on the hand. 18.Did you have any role models when you were our age? Yes, my role models were my parents. 19.How did you spend your summer holidays? What were your favorite summer activities? Where did your family go on vacations? I would play in the garden and plant and plow in the field. I would also pick vegetables. From eight to twelve in the morning I was in school and from two to five I was in cheder, and the rest of the day I would play soccer. 20.Did most of your family live in the same community, did they get together on Yomim Tovim (Pesach, Succos etc.)? Yes, most of my family lived in the same community. We would only get together in shul.

25: I went to Budapest I was an assistant plumber there. When I came to Canada I went to learn to be a plumber. Then I got a job at a plumbing supply place, it wasn’t what I wanted to do. 27. What job did you do most of your life, what did you like the most or the least about it? I owned a dry cleaning business. I enjoyed everything, otherwise I wouldn’t have stayed. 28.Where, when, and how did you meet your spouse? At a mutual friend’s wedding. 29.Where did you get married, what was your chasana like, and where was it held (shul, house, hall etc)? I got married in Montreal, in a Spanish & Portuguese Shul. It was a beautiful wedding. 30.How many children do you have? 6 k”ah 5 girls and 1 boy. 31.I’d like to think back to the day your first child was born what was the experience like for you? It was scary. 32.What are some special memories of raising your children? I don’t have any one special moment, it was all special. 33. What is something funny or embarrassing one of your children said at an early age that you’ll never forget? I remember when my daughter Chanie, your mother was 3 yrs old. We took her to yechidus to the Rebbe. Before we went in we were practicing that when the Rebbe would ask her name that she should answer “Chanie Rosler” you see at that time we were calling her “Chanie baby boo boo” and she thought that was her name. So after practicing over and over again we thought she knew what to answer. Finally, we were called in and the Rebbe looks at your mother and asks with a smile “what’s your name?” to which your mother replied “Chanie Baby Boo Boo Rosler” the Rebbe gave such a big smile and called her over to give her a dollar. I will never forget that day! | 25.What’s different about growing up today from when you were growing? Especially the behavior of children both at home and in school. The change is unbelievable. The children’s behavior in general is unacceptable. 26.What was your first job, what did you like or dislike about your job? | 23.What inventions do you most remember? I don’t remember any invention more then another. 24.Describe a person or situation from your childhood that had a profound effect on the way you look at life. My father had a profound effect on the way I look at life.

26: 38.Do you enjoy traveling and where have you gone? I used to not anymore. I’ve gone to Niagara Falls, Toronto, New York, New Jersey, and California. 39.What would you say has been your greatest adventure so far? My greatest adventure was visiting the Rebbe in New York. 40.What interests and hobbies do you have now and what do you like to do for fun? I like learning. 41.What kinds of things bring you most pleasure now? Thinking or being with my family, wife and grandchildren bring me the most pleasure now. 42.What impact, if any, did world war one have on your life or your family? I don’t know. 43.What impact, if any, did the great depression have on your life or your family? I don’t think it had an impact on my family. 44.What impact, if any, did world war two (holocaust) have on your life or family? I lost my entire family. It changed my life completely. 45.What’s the most difficult thing that happened to you, how did you deal with it? The holocaust is the most difficult thing that ever happened to me. I lost my entire family and came out on my own. I had to rebuild my life but I never burdened my family because of my loss. I put it aside and didn’t let it influence me. It’s painful when I try to envision my father’s face or even height I can’t picture it. I can’t even remember his expressions. | 35.How is my mother/father most like me? I don’t know. I love you both to pieces. | 36.What is it like to be a grandparent? I’m grateful to Hashem that He made me a grandparent. I say B”H with an emes. I love all my grandchildren. 37.What do you remember about me when I was born? I don’t remember. | 34.How did you feel about raising a family, what was the best and hardest part? There were no hardest or best parts. The job had to be done. I worked very hard to make a living and pay for everyday living expenses. I was devoted my whole life to them. No work was ever too hard for me to keep my house going.

27: 51.If you could do anything you wanted to do, what would it be? I can’t think of anything better than being in Eretz Yisroel with my family. 52.What do you think has stayed the same or changed throughout your life? My honesty, integrity, and sincerity, has stayed the same. 53.If you could go back to any age, what age would it be and why? Every stage of my life was a struggle so I really can’t answer that. 54.What advice did you parents or grandparents give you that you remember the most? I learnt from their actions. 55.What is the best advice that you can offer me? My best advice is to read everything I told you about and apply it. Follow in your parents footsteps. 56.Now for some advice for your grandchildren what would you say to them about the area of education? Learn by my example, when I made my own arrangements to learn with the Shick family because my parents couldn’t do that for me. I had a yearning to learn that’s how you should yearn to learn and seek it out. 57.What advice would you give them about money? You need to earn money to support your family and give tzedakah. Anything else isn’t important. 58.What about to raise children? You should read about what you just wrote. One day I was doing something bad, my father took his belt and started hitting the bed. I was hiding under the bed yet I was still so scared. At supper time I wanted to say I’m sorry to my father but I just couldn’t bring myself to doing it. Instead I sneaked behind him and gave him a big hug and kiss on his hand that | 48.What’s your happiest and proudest moment? My happiest and proudest moment is being with my children. | 49.What would you have done different in your life, if you knew then what you know now? I don’t know. 50.What do you hope to accomplish next? I hope to live to see Moshiach. | 47.What’s been your greatest accomplishment so far? My greatest accomplishment was raising my family. | 46.What things are most important to you, and why? The most important thing to me now is to serve Hashem and love my family.

28: While I was interviewing Zeidy I was thinking about what a hard life he had, but he was always happy. We can learn a big lesson from this, Zeidy didn't have everything he wanted yet alone needed, but you never saw him with a frown. So too by us, we have everything we need, and most of the things we want, but that's not enough, we always need more and more. We should always be happy with what we have and not run after thing that we don't have. If we have this impression everything will be a little more peaceful. Zeidy taught me to love everyone, no matter who or what. Even if you are angry with someone you should always make peace. We must never hold a grudge on anyone, not even if they beat us up. Once the everyone makes peace with each other then Moshiach will for sure come. | 59.Since future generations will be reading this what do you have to say to them? Again, read everything I told you, think about it and apply it. 60.Is there anything else you would like to add to complete things? We want Moshiach now!! 61.How much did it cost when you were a teenager for postage stamps, subway, bus-fare, candy bar, soda can, potato chips bags, bread, rolls, milk, etc.? Make a chart and compare it to the prices today. I don’t remember any of the prices, I remember once I got a chocolate I wanted to eat it so badly but looking at my friend I saw he wanted it too. I gave him the chocolate to eat, I felt so much better giving him the chocolate to eat, then eating it myself. | was my apology. No matter how much I was mad at my father I still loved him. you too should love every one no matter how much you're mad at them.

29: Interview with Bubby Rosler, taken over the phone in the week of Parshas Vayakel,Tes Zayin - Chof Alef Adar Alef | 1.What is your full name? Masha Rosler (nee silver) 2.Who were you named after, is there anything special about you first or last name? Do you know the meaning of your last name? After my father’s father Moshe. I have no idea. 3.Where were you born? I was born In Montreal, Jean Talon hospital. 4.How many children are in your family and what number child are you? There were four children, I had 3 brothers above me, and I was the youngest. 5.Where did you live as a child, (big city, town or village)? Describe the life and neighborhood there? I lived in a big city, Montreal. Most of the area was Jewish. There were only 3 goyishe families on my street the rest were Jewish. 6.What was your apartment or house like when you grew up, how many bedrooms and bathrooms did you have? What was your bedroom like? I lived on the first floor of a triplex. We had no heating. We had to use coal in the furnace. It wasn’t like the houses of today. There was my parent’s bedroom a backroom. The toilet and bathroom were separate rooms. The toilet was one room and the bathtub and sink was another. We had a living room which had a bed in there. On the other side of the house we had a double parlor, which my mother divided into two bedrooms. My bedroom was a little room under the stairs. 7.Describe the basic mode of transportation in the area you grew up in? The basic mode of transportation was the street car. 8.Tell me about your parents, where were they born, what memories do you have of them? They were from Russia. I am the first Canadian generation. My father went to work before I woke up and came home after I went to sleep. I only got to know my father when he retired. My father was a very quiet and well liked man. He wasn’t very well. My mother was a homemaker, always cooking, cleaning and baking. She was more active and talkative then my father. My mother was always there for us. 9.How did your family earn money? How did they compare to others in the neighborhood-richer, poorer, or the same? My father was a bookbinder when he first came as an immigrant. My father then owned a fruit and vegetable store. It wasn’t like the stores of today. All the fruits and vegetables were piled up in a pyramid and you couldn’t take anything yourself. It

30: I didn’t know my father’s father. He was niftar 4 years before I was born. They were born in Russia. My father was from Riga. My father’s mother’s father was a shochet. My father’s mother lived by her daughter and my mother’s parents lived with my aunt. In those days they weren’t young when they came to America so they had to live by someone. My father’s mother was a super baker. To me my Bubbe was Bubbe and my Zeide was Zeide, I never even thought of asking them their name. 11.What can you tell me about your family farther back than your grandparents? The only thing I know is that my mother’s Zeide had a farm. 12.Is there anything else you can share with me about your family history (any special stories, unusual events, or famous people)? We would go visit our grandparent’s occasionally. We never went for meals besides Purim we got goodies from them. 13.What is the earliest memory you have of your childhood and how old were you at the time? On Sundays my father was working, so me, my siblings and cousins would go to the amusement parks or go to the mountain. 14.What were you like as a child? What did you like to eat? What did you do for fun? What are your favorite games, sports, books, or hobbies, and what did you do for entertainment as a teenager? I was a studious and good child. I took music lessons for violin and piano so a lot of my time was playing and practicing music. We were never bored we played outdoors all the time. We played tag, marbles and nuts. I had a best friend named Silvia in 8th grade. We hung out by each other’s house all the time. I didn’t like crowds. I loved nosh. I didn’t like fish (besides for my mother’s gefilte fish) peppers or tomatoes. My mother baked a lot I loved most of everything she made. 15.What do you remember about the time before you went to school? You didn’t go to school till the age of 5. We played outside all the time. It was very safe then. We would play tag, hide and seek. On Pesach we played with nuts. 16.What kind of school did you go to, what was your favorite and least favorite subject? Were you a good student? I went to an English elementary school called Fairmount. My mother sent me to a Talmud Torah for a little while. She took me out because she taught me how to read the Aleph Bais and Daaven. I went to Barin Bing for high school. My favorite subject was English and grammar. I didn’t have a worse subject. I was a good student. 17.What are some vivid memories of your elementary school years? I would conduct the school choir b/c I played the violin and piano. I was like a big musician. | 10.Did you know your grandparents, where were they born, and what do you remember about them?

31: Sundays they all came to our house and my mother would make and serve kreplach- she was famous for them. 21.What did you want to be when you grew up? I wanted to be a musician. 22.What big world events do you remember from when you were in eighth grade? I remember WWII. My oldest brother was in the army and my 2nd oldest brother was in the air force. 23.What inventions do you most remember? The man going to the moon (I was in middle of making cherry jam). I also remember when Kennedy was shot. 24.Describe a person or situation from your childhood that had a profound effect on the way you look at life. I looked up to my parents because they taught me the values of life. I also looked up to my violin teacher. 25.What’s different about growing up today from when you were growing? Especially the behavior of children both at home and in school. Everything is different. 26.What was your first job, what did you like or dislike about your job? I did secretarial work for my husband’s dry cleaning business. I liked the fact that I helped him build up his business. 27. What job did you do most of your life, what did you like the most or the least about it? Being a housewife and being involved in my husband’s business. I liked them both very much. 28.Where, when, and how did you meet your spouse? I met him at a mutual friends wedding. 29.Where did you get married, what was your chasana like, and where was it held (shul, house, hall etc)? My wedding was in a shul in Montreal. It was a very nice and big wedding. My mother and father had a lot of family so the wedding was 99% family. | 20.Did most of your family live in the same community, did they get together on Yomim Tovim (Pesach, Succos etc.)? Yes, we all lived near each other. Nobody could afford having others for meals. We would get together and go on trips or | 18.Did you have any role models when you were our age? My parents were my only role models. 19.How did you spend your summer holidays? What were your favorite summer activities? Where did your family go on vacations? We couldn’t afford to go on vacations. We just spent our day playing outside with our friends.

32: 33. What is something funny or embarrassing one of your children said at an early age that you’ll never forget? When your mother was young we would call her Chanie Baby Boo Boo. One day we were waiting in line to go to the Rebbe, we practiced with your mother that if the Rebbe asks her, her name she should say my name is Chana Rosler. When we got into the room the Rebbe asked her what her name is, she said Chanie Baby Boo Boo Rosler Another funny thing happened with Leah Devorah (Wawa) when we went to the Rebbe, we were all talking to the Rebbe so we didn’t see what she was doing. Her hand was crawling on the Rebbes desk and she was trying to touch the Rebbes hand. Of course when we saw what she was doing we grabbed her hand away. 34.How did you feel about raising a family, what was the best and hardest part? Raising children is always hard there’s no easy part. The best part is when they behaved, were polite, and follow the rules that were set for them, that give a lot of pleasure to me now. When you went to P.T.A. and got a good report that gave you a lot of nachas. 35.How is my mother like me? I wish I can answer that, but because you don’t live here I can’t answer it. 36.What is it like to be a grandparent? It’s a beautiful experience to be a grandparent. 37.What do you remember about me when I was born? Well, you weren’t in Montreal, but from what I do remember of you is that you were a sweet lovable baby. 38.Do you enjoy traveling and where have you gone? Yes, I enjoy traveling, I have been to my daughters in Los Angeles, New Jersey, and New York. I have also gone to see my son in Toronto. | 31.I’d like to think back to the day your first child was born what was the experience like for you? It was a long and hard birth but very exciting. | 30.How many children do you have? I have 6 children K”AH 1 boy and five girls. | 32.What are some special memories of raising your children? It was very pleasant going to PTA and hearing good reports.

33: I wasn’t born in the depression, I think it affected my father’s business, because he lost tons of money. 44.What impact, if any, did world war two (holocaust) have on your life or family? I lived here in Canada so it didn’t have an impact on me, but it had on my husband who actually went through it. 45.What’s the most difficult thing that happened to you, how did you deal with it? The most difficult thing that happened to me was when I was sick. I was sick so I couldn’t do anything about it. 46.What things are most important to you, and why? My husband, children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, are the most important to me now, because I love them all with all my heart. 47.What’s been your greatest accomplishment so far? My greatest accomplishment so far was raising a family. 48.What’s your happiest and proudest moment? Well, there isn’t a happiest moment and there isn’t a proudest moment, to single one out I can’t do. 49.What would you have done different in your life, if you knew then what you know now? I would have studied harder and I would’ve practiced harder. 50.What do you hope to accomplish next? I hope to see Moshiach with my husband, children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. MOSHIACH NOW. 51.If you could do anything you wanted to do, what would it be? There’s nothing I ever really wanted to do, but I would study music and be a musician. | house for only two weeks, and my other bubby we would never go to her. My parents were always giving me advice to be a lady, to be polite, and the same thing that your mother tells you. Mothering has not changed. | 55.What is the best advice that you can offer me? I’m very proud of you because you’re a very good young lady, there isn’t much to offer because you’re polite, kind, and tznius. Maybe if you lived in Montreal I would have something to tell you but you don’t, all I can say is to stand straight. | 42.What impact, if any, did world war one have on your life or your family? I wasn’t born during world war one, my parents came to Montreal as children so it didn’t affect them either. 43.What impact, if any, did the great depression have on your life or your family? | 39.What would you say has been your greatest adventure so far? My greatest adventure was going to see the Rebbe in New York. 40.What interests and hobbies do you have now and what do you like to do for fun? My hobby was music, I stopped practicing it, and I talk to my daughters and granddaughters/sons on the phone. 41.What kinds of things bring you most pleasure now? My daughters and granddaughters/sons bring me the most pleasure now. One of my grandsons Tanchum Gershon calls me every single Friday to wish me good Shabbos and that’s what brings me the most pleasure.

34: 56.Now for some advice for your great grandchildren what would you say to them about the area of education? I wouldn’t change anything like I said above, but I would say to learn well have good middos, and act with derech eretz, because that part in life never changes. 57.What advice would give them about money? The same thing that I would give my children and grandchildren don’t desire for what you cannot have and be happy with what you do have. 58.What about to raise children? The same advice to do their best in yeshiva, have good middos, and be chassidishe children. Also to be entirely connected to the Rebbe. 59.Since future generations of your family will be reading this, what do you have to say to them? Exactly the same thing I told you I will tell them I don’t think I’ll change a word. 60.Is there anything else you would like to add or to say to complete things? At this moment I can’t think of anything else to say, I think I’ve said everything, my only wish is to be mekusher to the Rebbe, have frum children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren etc. MOSHIACH NOW. | **we didn’t use stamps, but there was a time when you had to put stamps on a check, the only reason why I know the price is because I kept my father’s checks. ***I don’t know prices because when my mother did send me to the store we had an account there so I would just put everything on the account and once a week my mother would go to the store and pay our debt. **** When I was little we didn't have any chips or sodas. | 52.What do you think has stayed the same or changed throughout your life? I don’t think anything has stayed the same, you grow with life experiences and things change, you also try to become a better person. 53.If you could go back to any age, what age would it be and why? I would go back to being in my twenties because I was healthy and I was able to do what I chose to do. 54.What advice did your parents or grandparents give you that you remember most? My grandparents never gave advice, that’s where life was different, my father’s mother was old and she would come to our | 55.What is the best advice that you can offer me? I’m very proud of you because you’re a very good young lady, there isn’t much to offer because you’re polite, kind, and tznius. Maybe if you lived in Montreal I would have something to tell you but you don’t, all I can say is to stand straight.

35: Bubby always stresses about the importance to have good middos, being kind and polite. When I watch the way Bubby davens I know her Tefilos are for sure being answered, this makes me want to daven and act the same way she does. Bubby is my inspiration, she knows a lot about what it means to be a Jew. She taught me to learn well, practice hard, and most importantly to be tznius. Even though life ischanging we should to to do our best and try to succeed in everything, especially in Torah and mitzvos. | 61.How much did it cost when you were a teenager for postage stamps, subway, bus-fare, candy bar, soda can, potato chip bags, bread, rolls, milk, etc.? Make a chart and compare it with prices today. Street cars* - $.05-.25 - $2.25 Bread - $.10 - $2.15 Milk - $.15-.25 - $1.89 Stamp** - $.03 - $.44 *we had no buses, instead we had streetcars. | **we didn’t use stamps, but there was a time when you had to put stamps on a check, the only reason why I know the price is because I kept my father’s checks. ***I don’t know prices because when my mother did send me to the store we had an account there so I would just put everything on the account and once a week my mother would go to the store and pay our debt. ****when I was little we didn’t have chips or soda.

36: ZEIDY ROSLER AND BUBBY ROSLER'S PARENTS Zeidy Rosler was born in Germany, he went through the holocaust. At the end of the war an army boat took Zeidy from Brayman Port in Germany to Halifax where he spent his Rosh Hashana with a few Jewish friends at a farmer’s house. From Halifax Zeidy went to Montreal. Bubby Rosler's parents, Bubby and Zeidy Silver went from Russia to Canada.

37: The AWESOME Rosler's! | The Zirkinds | The Aranows | The Schmuklers | The Rapoports | In family life, love is the oil that eases friction, the cement that binds closer together, and the music that brings harmony. | The Roslers

38: Zeidy Rosler -Tzi Yaakov | Zeidy was born in Szolos Czechoslovakia, On Rosh Chodesh Sivan, he was brought up in a family of five. Zeidy went to Montreal by boat after the holocaust; there he started a new family and a new lifestyle. Zeidy had a very hard life; he was the first member of his family to survive infancy. Whoever was older than him passed away. Zeidy's parents got a bracha for him to survive, but in order for that to happen he couldn't wear new clothing. Zeidy's teenage years came to an abrupt stop when he was torn away from his family and sent to Auschwitz. He entered to the concentration camp at the young age of fifteen. Two years later he was finally freed and abled to leave. When Zeidy came to Canada he married Bubby. Even though Zeidy had a really hard he still does everything in his power to make sure his family doesn't feel the pain. He also worked hard to make his family a beautiful family, and I really admire him for that. | Zeidy Rosler - Yitzchok a"h | Zeidy's Father a"h worked very hard, he served in the Russian army for some time, when he came back he was very rich. Zeidy owned a hardware store in order to get at least a little bit of money. He also tried very hard to raise a family, but unfortunately Hitlor ym"skilled his whole family, the only remaining survivor is Zeidy. On Shavuos Zeidy's father along with his whole family were taken on a cattle car, ten days later he was put in the gas chambers to perish with his wife and four of his kids. If only he would be able to see what a family Zeidy raised. | Bubby Rosler - Rivka a"h | Zeidy's Mother a"h is a special person she knew how to make something from nothing. Bubby kept her family strong and happy through those hard and difficult times. Unfortunately she was not able to see what all of her hard work did. I am sure that right now in shamayim she is smiling at all of her grandchildren, great-grandchildren etc.

39: Bubby was born in Montreal, Canada on Hey Sivan, June Nineteenth. Bubby grew up in a family of four, three boys and one girl. Bubby is a very special person; while Bubby was busy with raising her kids she still helped a lot of other people. Till today she hosts weekly Shiurim in her house. She also did a lot of mivtzoim. Bubby was also very dedicated to Zeidy's business. She works very hard to make everyone's life as easy as possible. She raised a big and beautiful family which only continues to grow and grow. | Bubby Rosler -Masha | Bubby Silver - Basya Perel a"h | Bubby's mother a"h was born in Russia., she came to Canada at the age of thirteen. She was a homemaker and always found cooking, cleaning, baking, and the like. She was also always home for her kids when they needed aid. Bubby was more on the quieter side, but she was still an amazing women. Bubby passed away at the very young age of sixty seven. | Zeidy Silver - Tanchum Gershon a"h | Bubby's father was Born in Riga and went to Canada at a very young age. He went to work very early in the morning and came home late at night. At first Zeidy worked in a bookbinding business, but as the years went by he opened up a fruit store and worked there. Zeidy had a quiet nature yet he was an amazing man. | Bubby's Grandparent's lived with one of Bubby's aunts, they were old when they came to America so they couldn't live alone. Bubby's Zeide had a farm. | Bubby & Zeidy Baretzky - Zalman Meir Halevi & Leah a"h | Bubby Silver & Zeidy Silver - Moshe & Devorah a"h | Bubby's Bubby lived by her daughter. She was an amazing baker. Her father was a shochet. Nothing is known about Zeidy Silver, Bubby Rosler was named after him.

40: Bubby Rosler | Shmuli and Zeidy | Bubby Rosler holding Mommy | Bubby Rivka and Bubby Clara | Zeidy Silver and his son | Bubby Basya Perel, Mommy | Mommy and Bubby | Nechama, Mommy and Zeidy

41: Bubby and Zeidy | Bubby Basya Perel, Mommy, Nechama, Leah Devorah | The Silver Family | Bubby and Nechama | Mommy, Bubby and Bubby Basya Perel | Rivkie, Nechama, Shternie, Leah, Shulamit and Mommy | Nechama, Mommy, Tante Leah Devorah | The Rosler Family

42: I don't care how poor a man is; if he has family, he's rich. | The Rimler Side

43: Interview with Zeidy Rimler, taken on Yud Beis Adar Alef, February 16, 2011, at 8:45. | 1.What is your full name Dovid Aryeh 2.Who were you named after, is there anything special about you first or last name? Do you know the meaning of your last name? My first name Dovid, is after an uncle, and my second name, Aryeh, is after my grandfather. I don’t know the meaning of my family name, someone once mentioned it when I was very little so I don’t remember. 3.Where were you born? I was born In USA, in the Brooklyn Women’s Hospital. 4.How many children are in your family and what number child are you? I have four siblings above me and I am the fifth. 5.Where did you live as a child, (big city, town or village)? Describe the life and neighborhood there? As a child, I grew p in Brownsville, It was an old run-down neighborhood. Life was simple. There weren’t many yeshivos, and therefore, many people went to public school. I remember people selling their goods in pushcarts in the middle of the street. Some people kept their stores open on Shabbos because they needed the money. There was a Vad-HaShabbos, who would go down the street telling everyone that it’s Shabbos. My father got a “Shomer Shabbos” certificate from the Vad-HaShabbos, which he displayed in his front store window because his store was closed on Shabbos. 6.What was your apartment or house like when you grew up, how many bedrooms and bathrooms did you have? What was your bedroom like? First we lived in a building on the second floor (two flights up). We had two bedrooms and one bathroom. My parents slept in one room, and my three sisters slept in the other one. My brother and I slept in the living room, on a day bed, which was a couch by day and bed by night. When I was thirteen, we moved to the first floor of a two-family house that was above our family grocery store. When we moved I finally got a bedroom, because we had three rooms. 7.Describe the basic mode of transportation in the area you grew up in? There were trolleys, busses, and trains. There was also the Children’s Bus Company to take children to school. 8.Tell me about your parents, where were they born, what memories do you have of them? My parents were hard working people. My mother was born in Russia and my father was born in Poland/Galicia. They would always say “gashmiyos doesn’t count.” I have very wonderful and fond memories of them. 9.How did your family earn money? How did they compare to others in the neighborhood-richer, poorer, or the same? My family wasn’t poor but we were on the lower average. My father had an income from a grocery store we owned that was in the building below from where we lived. In 1957 the government took the building away from my family because they wanted to build a park in its place. They gave my parents two thousand collars for it, therefore we moved to Albany

44: and Lincoln Ave. in Crown Heights. For a half a year my father worked in a super market on Albany and Eastern Pkwy. He then bought a stationary business on Eastern Pkwy. Which he worked in for two and a half years, until Netzach Yisroel who owned the property kicked him out because he wanted to build a shul there. In 1960 my parent bought a property on Kingston Ave. and Union Street and opened a stationary store there. Economically we were just like everyone else as no one was rich. 10.Did you know your grandparents, where were they born, and what do you remember about them? Yes I knew my grandparents, my mother’s parents were born in Russia. They were majestic and inspiring people it was great being and talking with them. With my eternal grandparents I had a very close connection, I would help my grandfather walk and I would support him when he needed to go places. They passed away during a ten month period and it was a big tragedy. 11.What can you tell me about your family farther back than your grandparents? I have no information about that. 12.Is there anything else you can share with me about your family history (any special stories, unusual events, or famous people)? I don’t know, but I think we might come from Meshulem Zushe M’anipoli, because that’s where the name comes from. 13.What is the earliest memory you have of your childhood and how old were you at the time? When I was going to cheder for the first time I got wrapped in a talis. 14.What were you like as a child? What did you like to eat? What did you do for fun? What are your favorite games, sports, books, or hobbies, and what did you do for entertainment as a teenager? I was a quiet studios student. I had a pleasant voice as a child. My favorite song was Ani Mamen. I once sang a duet at a Lubavitcher Yeshiva dinner, as the entertainment. I didn’t really have any Jewish friends in my neighborhood with whom you play with, so I played ball against the building wall by myself. I liked chocolate and ice cream and didn’t like tomatoes, I normally ate whatever my mother made. My favorite game was chess and checkers. My favorite sport was stickball (like baseball just with a stick and not with a bat) and punch ball. I did not have any favorite books as there were rarely any Jewish books then. I didn’t either go to the library to choose books from. My favorite hobbies were drawing, art-n-craft and creating things. As a teenager I didn’t have so much time on my hands because I was always in Yeshiva. 15.What do you remember about the time before you went to school? I remember tagging along with my mother while she brought all my older siblings to school. 16.What kind of school did you go to, what was your favorite and least favorite subject? Were you a good student? I went to Lubavitcher yeshiva (I am still there today only now I am a teacher) my favorite subject was Navi and science, my least favorite subject was geography. My favorite teacher was rabbi Barnetzki because he was very loving has a wonderful personality and was a great teacher. I was a good student.

45: 19.How did you spend your summer holidays? Where did your family go on vacations? For half a day I would learn in Yeshiva and the other half, I would spend in the store, or just played around. Some years, I’d go to camp or to the bungalow with my family. 20.What was your favorite summer activity? I loved row-boating. 21.Did most of your family live in the same community, did they get together on Yomim Tovim (Pesach, Succos etc.)? We lived pretty close to each other, we would get together by the Seder or other happy occasions. 22.What did you want to be when you grew up? I wanted to do something in the field of education (today I am a teacher). 23.What big world events do you remember from when you were in eighth grade? I remember the beginning of the space program and the sputnik. 24.What inventions do you most remember? I remember the air conditioners in cars, and the signal lights on the car. 25.Describe a person or situation from your childhood that had a profound effect on the way you look at life. My third grade Rebbi had a big effect on my life. He was very caring and always had a smile on his face. He always had a good word to say even in a not good situation. 26.What’s different about growing up today from when you were growing? Especially the behavior of children both at home and in school. When I was growing up people were calmer and we had more time to learn. Now there are a lot of distractions such as computers cell phones etc. 27.What was your first job, what did you like or dislike about your job? My first job was to run the release time program. I liked that I was able to each other children. 28. What job did you do most of your life, what did you like the most or the least about it? Teaching, I like it when you see a student’s accomplishments, and I don’t like it when you see students struggle especially from the modern day distractions. | 17.What are some vivid memories of your elementary school years? Our yeshiva was on Bedford and Dean Ave. on 19 Grant Square there is a huge statue of General Grant. My friends and I would always go there to play around him. 18.Did you have any role models when you were our age? Yes, the Rebbe. I look to him and admire him.

46: someone call his office to notify him when we are going to the chuppah and it will be just like he is there. This was the best experience of my life. 31.How many children do you have? I have six children kein ayin harah, three boys (Zushie, Yitzchok, and Heshy) and three girls (Rochie, Chanie, and Liba’le). 32.I’d like to think back to the day your first child was born what was the experience like for you? It was a very exciting and uplifting experience. 33.What are some special memories of raising your children? I really enjoyed it when my children were well behaved. 34. What is something funny or embarrassing one of your children said at an early age that you’ll never forget? Your father would always shake his finger and say “no no,” one time we were in a store, he shook his finger and said “no no” to the shelf with books. Then he shook the shelf and knocked down all the books. Another time Rochie (his older sister) told him “you are a baby, you wear diapers,” your father looked at her and said “you are a baby you wear underwear.” 35.How did you feel about raising a family, what was the best and hardest part? I hope they will follow in our footsteps. The hardest part was when they were struggling or were sick. 36.How is my father like me? You are both good-hearted and kind. 37.What is it like to be a grandparent? A grandparent is like being a double parent. | 29.Where, when, and how did you meet Bubby? I met her half a year before I got married, Dovid Raskin was the shadchin and he put us two together. 30.Where did you get married, what was your chasana like, and where was it held (shul, house, hall etc)? There were no wedding halls in Crown Heights at that time so we got married in Riverside Plaza Hotel in Manhattan. When my family went into yechidus with the Rebbe before my wedding, my mother asked the Rebbe if he would be able to be mesader kiddushin, since he was by all my other siblings, (I am the youngest) so the Rebbe told my mother to have

47: 42.What kinds of things bring you most pleasure now? To see my grandchildren thrive in school and behave nicely brings me the most pleasure. 43.What impact, if any, did world war one have on your life or your family? I wasn’t born by world war one, so it had no impact on me. 44.What impact, if any, did the great depression have on your life or your family? The great depression was before my times, it had nothing to do with me. 45.What impact, if any, did world war two (holocaust) have on your life or family? I wasn’t born yet, but my grandparents were left behind. 46.What’s the most difficult thing that happened to you, how did you deal with it? The most difficult thing was the loss of my grandparents, parents, and the Rebbe. By hoping Moshiach will come that’s what helps me deal with it. 47.What things are most important to you, and why? The most important thing is to continue to see nachas from my children and grandchildren. 48.What’s been your greatest accomplishment so far? Teaching thousands of students and watching them become shluchim of the Rebbe. 49.What’s your happiest and proudest moment? My happiest moment was my wedding day, and proudest moment was the day I got semicha. 50.What would you have done different in your life, if you knew then what you know now? I would have devoted more time to learning. 55.What advice did your parents or grandparents give you that you remember most? | 38.What do you remember about me when I was born? You were the cutest little girl I ever saw. 39.Do you enjoy traveling and where have you gone? Yes, I love traveling. The question isn’t where have I gone but it’s where haven’t I gone. I have been to practically every place in the world. 40.What would you say has been your greatest adventure so far? My greatest adventure is when I went to Israel for the first time with your father. 41.What interests and hobbies do you have now and what do you like to do for fun? | I like to read books and relax.

48: To be honest and to take care of your health 56.What is the best advice that you can offer me? To be honest, study hard, guard your health, and be kind to others. 57.Nowfor some advice for your great grandchildrenwhat would you say to them about the area of education? I don’t have grandchildren yet, but when I have I would give them the same advice as everyone else. 58.What advice would give them about money? You should earn your money in an honest way, because it’s on loan from Hashem. 59.What about to raise children? You should raise your children in a chassidishe way, and any pitfalls that you had as a kid, you should guard around them. 60.Since future generations of your family will be reading this, what do you have to say to them? Pay serious attention to what you are learning, acquire as much knowledge as possible and share it with others. You should try to avoid machlokes, and be nice and helpful to others. 61.Is there anything else you would like to add or to say to complete things? You should always judge others the way you would want to be judged. 62.How much did it cost when you were a teenager for postage stamps, subway, bus-fare, candy bar, soda can, potato chip bags, bread, rolls, milk, etc.? Make a chart and compare it with prices today. | 51.What do you hope to accomplish next? I hope to help bring Moshiach as soon as possible. 52.If you could do anything you wanted to do, what would it be? I would bring Moshiach. 53.What do you think has stayed the same or changed throughout your life? Everyone still pays bills but the cost of living is very different. 54.If you could go back to any age, what age would it be and why?

49: Stamp - $.02 - $.44 Candy bar - $.05 - $.15 Soda - $.10 - $.75-$1.00 Post card - $.01 - $.28 Bread - $.18 a pound - $2.15 Roll - $.02 - $.40 Milk - $.20 a bottle - $1.89 Bus - $.05 - $2.25 Letter - $.01$ - .44 Rent$ - 25.00 a month$ - 1,500-1,800 a month chips - $.05 - $.25 Zeidy taught me what it means to be a bas chabad, He taught me how to daven, learn, and study hard. Zeidy stresses on the importance of being honest. I also learned from Zeidy that taking care of your health is very important, even though it's something gashmius. One of the biggest lessons that I learned from Zeidy is to be kind to others.

50: Interview with Bubby Rimler taken on Yud Beis Adar Alef, February 16, 2011 at 7:00 | 1.What is your full name Sarah Gittel (nee Langsam) 2.Who were you named after, is there anything special about you first or last name? Do you know the meaning of your last name? I was named after my grandmother A”H who was killed in the holocaust, she died Al Kiddush Hashem. Langsam is not my real last name, it’s really Gewarten, during the war everyone had to escape so my parents changed their last name to Gewarten. 3.Where were you born? I was born In USA, in the Brooklyn Women’s Hospital. 4.How many children are in your family and what number child are you? I am the oldest child out of three kids. 5.Where did you live as a child, (big city, town or village)? Describe the life and neighborhood there? I lived in East New York, my family was the first Jewish people to come and the last to leave. 6.What was your apartment or house like when you grew up, how many bedrooms and bathrooms did you have? What was your bedroom like? Our apartment was considered a very nice one, it was a two family house, there was 1 bathroom and 2-3 bedrooms. I shared my room with my sister, when we got older we bought furniture, lamps, etc. to decorate my room. 7.Describe the basic mode of transportation in the area you grew up in? There were busses and trains. Cars were just coming out and my father learned how to drive one. He bought us a car when my family went to the country in the summer, it was a surprise for us. 8.Tell me about your parents, where were they born, what memories do you have of them? My father was born in Poland and my mother was born in Russia, they were very special people. They never thought or said loshon harah. My mother would make fake passports to help people escape Russia. My mother was very afraid, she was once talking to Nissan Nemenov and telling him how afraid she was, Nissan looked at her and said “you’re afraid to save people’s lives.” My father helped out a little with the making of the passports. 9.How did your family earn money? How did they compare to others in the neighborhood-richer, poorer, or the same? My father was a shamesh, he would also lain the torah, and he would take care of things around the shul. Later he became a real estate insurance broker in Boro Park, we used to go there and visit him quite often. My mother would sell glasses for very cheap. My family was the same economically as everyone else, the only thing different was that we didn’t have enough money to go to camp. 10.Did you know your grandparents, where were they born, and what do you remember about them? No, I didn't know my grandparents for they were killed in the holocaust.

51: 11.What can you tell me about your family farther back than your grandparents? Unfortunately I can’t say anything, my father never spoke about his family that was lost in the holocaust. Even though he went through a very hard life he still tried as hard as possible to make us kids happy. 12.Is there anything else you can share with me about your family history (any special stories, unusual events, or famous people)? My father was at a farbreingen with the Friediker Rebbe. He put his coat down, at the end of the farbreingen he was looking for his coat, but it was nowhere to be found find it. He asked a few bochurim there if they saw his coat and they said that they sold it for mashke. My father started crying when Rebbetzin Nechama Dina came to him and asked him what had happened. He told her, she gave him a candy and he found his coat. 13.What is the earliest memory you have of your childhood and how old were you at the time? When I was four and my brother was three he had his upshernish in the country and Moshe Feinshtein cut his hair. 14.What were you like as a child? What did you like to eat? What did you do for fun? What are your favorite games, sports, books, or hobbies, and what did you do for entertainment as a teenager? We didn’t have any video machines or video games. I like to read a lot, and go to the library. In the summer I would go to the bungalow colony. 15.What do you remember about the time before you went to school? I stayed home all day, and on the first day of school I was crying because I didn’t want to go to school. 16.What kind of school did you go to, what was your favorite and least favorite subject? Were you a good student? I went to Beis Rivkah elementary school, in Beis Rivkah high school my class was the very first class. I liked math and reading, and I didn’t like science. I think I was a good student. 17.What are some vivid memories of your elementary school years? In elementary we would make Yiddish plays for the senior citizen home. Also when I graduated me and three other girls were chosen from a gorel to invite Rebbetzin Chana to my graduation. 18.Did you have any role models when you were our age? My parents were my role models. They went through the most terrible things but they still did good things. 19.How did you spend your summer holidays? What were your favorite summer activities? Where did your family go on vacations? We went to the bungalow colony. It wasn’t as fancy as it is today. There was no grass or pool. It took hr walk to get to the lake or any of the other colonies. 20.Did most of your family live in the same community, did they get together on Yomim Tovim (Pesach, Succos etc.)? My father had one brother living in Lakewood he was the only one, besides my father who survived the war. At first he didn’t even know he had a brother but later on he found out. In those days there was no Verrazano Bridge so we couldn’t visit him My mother also had one brother and we would get together for the Purim Seuda.

52: 21.What did you want to be when you grew up? I wanted to be a teacher. (And that’s what I am today) 22.What big world events do you remember from when you were in eighth grade? I remember When Russia sent Astronauts to space, I also remember the Cold War, we prepared ourselves was with drills. 23.What inventions do you most remember? I mostly remember the telephone it wasn’t just invented, but people just started buying them. I also remember when the air conditioners were invented. 24.Describe a person or situation from your childhood that had a profound effect on the way you look at life. My father had a really good friend who passed away at a very young age. Everyone put together money to make insurance for him, because his really rich uncle didn’t want to pay. 25.What’s different about growing up today from when you were growing? Especially the behavior of children both at home and in school. We didn’t have cell phones or any computer games, I remember I had a doll carriage, my neighbor sliced the hood of the carriage off. In those days we had a lot more Derech Eretz and we were more respectful then children these days. 26.What was your first job, what did you like or dislike about your job? My first job was to type envelopes, in those days I wasn’t good at typing (even though now I am a typing teacher) and I would make a lot of mistakes, we would have to rip up the envelopes but we had no where to put them so I wore a dress with really big pockets and I stuck I the garbage envelopes inside. I really didn’t like it because we got so little more. 27. What job did you do most of your life, what did you like the most or the least about it? I was a teacher most of my life, I teach typing and bookkeeping. I like it because people can get really good jobs because of it. It’s really hard to mark papers and prepare, and also Beis Rivkah doesn’t pay on time. 28.Where, when, and how did you meet your spouse? A man named Dovid Raskin put both of us together. 29.Where did you get married, what was your chasana like, and where was it held (shul, house, hall etc)? My wedding was in Manhattan, in a hotel called Riverside Plaza. In those days there were no halls in Crown Heights so we had no choice, and our wedding had to be in Manhattan. Our wedding was very nice and it was such a special experience I would never forget it.

53: 30.How many children do you have? I have six children K”AH 3 boys and 3 girls. 31.I’d like to think back to the day your first child was born what was the experience like for you? I was very excited, scared, and tired at the same time. It was an experience of a lifetime. 32.What are some special memories of raising your children? I only have happy memories, I am also very happy that my children got to be named after all the kedoshim that were killed in the holocaust. I am also happy that they are keeping the Jewish heritage. 33. What is something funny or embarrassing one of your children said at an early age that you’ll never forget? When your father was either five or six he was reading a siddur, when he came to the word yom I asked him what the translation was. He looked at me and said “siddur also has translation." 34.How did you feel about raising a family, what was the best and hardest part? The hardest part about raising a family is when they cry, the easiest part is when they get older and they act honorable and wonderful. 35.How is my father like me? You both cried a lot when you were a baby, and you like to do favors just like your father. 36.What is it like to be a grandparent? It’s very nice to be a grandparent, you can take the kids to your house and when you’re done with them you can send them home. 37.What do you remember about me when I was born? It was a very special experience because you were the first Esther named after my mother. 38.Do you enjoy traveling and where have you gone? Yes, I love traveling I went to Israel, Australia, Russia, Ukraine, and Florida. 39.What would you say has been your greatest adventure so far? My greatest adventure is when I was in Israel, it was very special to see Jewish history come alive. 40.What interests and hobbies do you have now and what do you like to do for fun? I like to read and relax, but I never get to relax being that I have two jobs. 41.What kinds of things bring you most pleasure now? The most pleasure now is to see nachas from my children and grandchildren, and watching them go in the way that we went.

54: 42.What impact, if any, did world war one have on your life or your family? World war one didn’t have any impact on me being that I wasn’t born. 43.What impact, if any, did the great depression have on your life or your family? I wasn’t born by the great depression so it had no effect. 44.What impact, if any, did world war two (holocaust) have on your life or family? I didn’t go through the war, but I felt we have to be extra good to bring my parents nachas from what they went through. 45.What’s the most difficult thing that happened to you, how did you deal with it? The most difficult thing was when my parents passed away, hoping that Moshiach will come helps me deal with it. 46.What things are most important to you, and why? My family is most important to me now, it’s all you really have. Who cares how much money you make? 47.What’s been your greatest accomplishment so far? My greatest accomplishment is that I raised frum and healthy children. 48.What’s your happiest and proudest moment? My happiest and proudest moment is when my children were born. 49.What would you have done different in your life, if you knew then what you know now? I wish I would’ve finished college, I only dropped out because my mother got very sick. 50.What do you hope to accomplish next? I want to be a great-grandmother, and I hope I will soon be able to retire and have more time for my children and grand children. 51.If you could do anything you wanted to do, what would it be? I would go to Israel once a year. 52.What do you think has stayed the same or changed throughout your life? I think that human nature stayed the same and technology changed a lot.

55: 53.If you could go back to any age, what age would it be and why? I would go back to being eight or ten, because I was too young to understand all the bad things that are and happen. 54.What advice did your parents or grandparents give you that you remember most? I didn’t have grandparents but my parents always taught me to be kind and to never talk back. My father always told us that whenever someone says or does something bad, we should look the other way. 55.What is the best advice that you can offer me? You should always look at the good in everyone. 56.Now for some advice for your great grandchildren what would you say to them about the area of education? You should learn well in school, because you never when the knowledge will come in handy. 57.What advice would give them about money? Money comes and money goes, money is not the most important thing in life. 58.What about to raise children? You should always love your children and instill in them the proper values of life. 59.Since future generations of your family will be reading this, what do you have to say to them? The future generations should make the past generations proud of them. 60.Is there anything else you would like to add or to say to complete things? Nope. 61.How much did it cost when you were a teenager for postage stamps, subway, bus-fare, candy bar, soda can, potato chip bags, bread, rolls, milk, etc.? Make a chart and compare it with prices today. Train - $.15 - $2.50 Stamp - $.04 - $.44 gum sticks (in a pack) - $.05 - $.65-.99 Gum sticks (single) - $.01 - $.05 | From Bubby I learned to look at the good in everything and everyone, even if something may seem bad, because on the other side of the world it really is good. Bubby also taught me to learn well and study hard, because you never know when the knowelagde will come in handy. Bubbys shining eyes and smiling face makes me want to be happy all the time.

56: Zeidy Langsam was born in Riga, Latvia. He fled to Samarkant and from there to England. Then he took the Queen Elizabeth across the ocean for eleven days until he reached the United States shore. Bubby Langsam was born in Russia, she fled to Samarkant and from there to England where she took the queen Elizabeth together with her husband to America. | Bubby Rimler's Parents | Zeidy Rimler was born in Sokolov, Galicia (which is now Poland). His parents sent him to America so he can have a better life here; when he came he was all alone. Bubby Rimler was born in Rashkov. She fled to Romania across the Dniester River; from there she took a horse and buggy ride to Austria. From Austria she took a train to Antwerp and from there got on a boat and went to Ellis Island. | Zeidy Rimler's parents

57: The AWESOME Rimler's! | L-R Shimon Shechter, Zalman, Rochie, Mushky Shechter, Dvory, Chana, Mendy, Chezki, Esther, Levi, Heshy, & Zevi Goldberg | L-R Shneor Zalman, Yitzchok, Tzviki, Doba, Bryna, Ari, Chezki, Yanki, and Mendel Rimler | L-R Mendy, Kisreal, Chanie, Levi, Pinchas, Mushky, Bentchy, Esther, Bryna, Chezki, and Shneor Sudak | L-R Heshy, Zeidy, Bubby, and Liba'le Rimler | When you look at your life, the greatest happinesses are family happinesses. | Esther, Mommy, Tatty, Emmy, Bryna, Peri, Riki, And Chaya Rimler

58: Zeidy Rimler - Dovid Aryeh | Zeidy was born in Brooklyn N.Y. and grew up in Brownsville. He married Bubby on June 21, 1967 in Riverside Plaza. Zeidy taught fourth grade for many years, and he still does. He used to be an English principal in ULY on Ocean Parkway; he now owns Judaica World on Kingston Ave. When Zeidy wanted to buy the store he went to the Rebbe, the Rebbe said he shouldn't give up teaching. He now teaches in ULY on Crown St. until 2:00 p.m., then he goes to the store. Even though Zeidy has a very busy schedule he always makes time for his children and grandchildren. | Zeidy Rimler - Tzvi Hersh a"'h | Zeidy's father was born in Sokolov, in the year 1905. His parents sent him to America when he was very young. he stayed at his relatives. Despite the hardships Zeidy was the only one in his family to stay frum . At first when Zeidy came to America he worked for his uncle in The Messing baking Company. After a while he started a leather business, he moved to a room on the Lower East Side of Manhattan on Delaney St. Eventually he left that to because his partner was dishonest. Zeidy joined a club called Bachurei Chemed, where they held a minyan and learned. Zeidy moved to the corner of Union S. and Kingsston Ave. where he opened a stationary store and toy shop. On the 24th of Shvat, 5734, February 16, 1974 Zeidy's neshama left to its creator. | Bubby Rimler-Yenta Bryna a"h | Zeidy's mother was born in the year 1907 in Rashkev, Ukraine. Bubby escaped Russia with her sister Rosie Epstein (nee Brown). They crossed the frozen Dniester River with rags on their feet in middle of the night. It took quite a while, because Rosie sister lost her rag. They found a lady whom they bribed to take them in. From Romania, the two girls took a horse to Austria; there they reunited with their mother and one of their brothers. Together the four of them took a train to Antwerp, and from their they took an eleven day boat ride to Ellis Island. Two years later at the age of 18 Bubby got a job in a knitting factory. She was fired for not showing up to work, but rehired soon after. In the year 1929 Bubby married Zeidy. Bubby helped start Beis Rivkah she would convince parents to send their children there. On the 8th of Kislev, 5764, December 3rd, 2004 Bubby was niftar.

59: Zeidy's maternal granfather was born in Russia, and lived there until 1911, when he came to America by boat. He had a wife and four children, he needed money, so he came to America alone. He came to find a job and support his family. When he arrived in America, he found a job as a mashgiach on a cholov yisroel milk farm. He didn’t have to work on Shabbos because the farm was owned by Jews. It was very hard to find kosher food because there were no grocery stores. If you wanted a chicken, you had to go to a poultry market and shecht the chicken yourself, or give it to a shochet. If you wanted milk, cheese, or any other dairy products, you had to go to the farm. That wasn’t a problem for Zeidy, for he worked on a milk farm. | Zeidy Brown - Meshulem Zushe a"h | Bubby Brown - Tila a"h | Zeidy's Maternal grandmother came to America in 1922 with two of her daughters and only one of her sons, being that the other one was already in America. She traveled from Rashkov. When she crossed the Dniester River, she traveled with one of her sons, her two daughters went ahead on the journey. After crossing the river they were in Romania. From there the two traveled to Austria, where she joined her daughters. Together the four took a train to Antwerp, and then an eleven day boat ride to Ellis Island. Before she left Russia, Bubby didn’t have a job. When she and Zeidy got older they opened a dry | Zeidy was alone in America for 11 years, until 1922, when his wife and three children joined him. One of his sons had already come to America. They had lived on the money Zeidy had sent them from America, and now he sent them tickets so they can leave Russia. like all European immigrants, Zeidy displayed great courage and strength in the 11 years that he spent away from his family. it was lucky for them that their husband and father had begun to vuild a new lifestyle for tem in Amwrica. | It was very difficult to find an apartment. When they finally found one, it was small. It contained a kitchen a kitchen, bedroom, and a bathroom for a mother, a father, and four children.It was also difficult to find kosher food. Bubby and her family were content with some water to drink and kosher bread to eat. There was no such thing as a hechsher like OU or OK. You had to get a live chicken and slaughter it (or hire a shochet) if you wanted chicken to eat. | Bubby & Zeidy Rimler - Yehuda Leib & Malya a"h | Zeidy's Paternal Grandparents lived in Soklov, Galicia. They were never anle to come to America. They raised four children, one boy and three girls. Zeidy was a shoemaker, that's how he made his money. In the year 1941 Zeidy left this world. The Nazis ym"s killed Bubby in 1943. | goods store ad sold handkerchiefs and the like. There were no girls’ schools for Bubby to attend but there was a boys' school called Chaim Berlin.

60: Bubby Rimler - Sara Gittel | On June 11th, 1947 a very special lady entered this world. This very special lady is my bubby. Her parents gave birth to her six months after they arrived in America. Because of Bubby they were allowed to stay here instead of being deported. Bubby went to Beis Rivka and was part of the founding class of Beis Rivka High School. Now Bubby teaches 9th grade typing and 11th grade bookkeeping as a living. She also helps out in Judaica World. Bubby is a very busy women, but no one can tell, because she greets you with a smile, and has a lot of patience for you, especially if you are her granddaughter. | Bubby & Zeidy Langsam - Yechezkel Chanoch Henoch & Esther a"h | Bubby and Zeidy came to America in 1947. Bubby was born in Russia, and Zeidy was born Latvia. They came to America together by boat from Samarkand, Russia, where Bubby was involved in making false passports so people can leave Russia. Zeidy helped as well, but most of his time was spent learning in Kamenitzer Yeshiva. It was the Yeshiva that got Bubby and Zeidy tickets to leave Russia. They docked on January 1st, 1947. Since it was New Years’ Day all the American workers were on vacation so Bubby and Zeidy waited on the boat for an extra day. On January 2nd only they were able to come off the boat. Once in America Zeidy found a job as a shamesh. Later on he became an insurance and real estate broker. Because my bubby was born just six months after Bubby and Zeidy Langsam docked. The Government wanted to give them a full time nanny to watch my bubby and Bubby and Zeidy Langsam will leave the country. Bubby and Zeidy Langsam refused that offer and were permitted to stay. When Bubby and Zeidy came there weren't many Yeshivos, there was Tomchei Temimim and a few other small schools. By the time my Bubby was a able to go to school Bais Rivka was already opened. It was very hard to find Housing in America at that time, particularly for immigrants, who were not very rich. Bubby and Zeidy were lucky they knew a friend who knew the landlord of a building, and through this friend they got a small apartment. It was so tiny that the bathtub was in the kitchen. But for Bubby and Zeidy it was a palace, as long as they had a roof over their head they were fine. Fortunately, food was not a problem at all, being that there were kosher stores.

61: Bubby & Zeidy Schusterman - Eliyahu & Rochel a"h | Bubby's maternal grandparents both lived in Russia. Unfortunately they were never able to leave Russia and come to America. They raised six children; there were three boys and three girls. In around the 1950 they both left this world. Even though I don't know Bubby and Zeidy, they still have a place in my heart. | Bubby & Zeidy Gawarten - Shmuel Menachem Mendel & Sara Gittel a"h | Bubby's paternal grandparents lived in Riga, they never had the chance to come to America, being that they were killed by the Nazi's ym's. They raised six kids; three boys and three girls. For a living they owned a dry goods store. During WW2 When there were bombs the townspeople would hide in bomb shelters. Once when there was a bomb Bubby ran to a bomb shelter in order to hide. Bubby was pregnant, so a women in the bomb shelter named Henya refused to let her in. Bubby was very devastated, without anywhere to go Bubby hid in the fields. Later on Bubby found out that whoever was in that bomb shelter died. She was so grateful that Henya didn't let her in, that when her son was born she added the name Henoch to him. Bubby and Zeidy were both killed by the Nazis ym's in the 1940's.

62: Bubby & Zeidy Langsam | Bubby Langsam | L-R Bubby & Zeidy Langsam, Bubby Schusterman, | L-R Shmuel, Zeidy, & Bubby, Langsam, Ela Pinson, Bubby Rimler | L-R Bubby Tila Brown, Bubby Bryna Rimler, Tante Chaya Popak, Zeidy Tzvi Hersh Rimler, Zeidy Rimler, Tante Sushie Alperowitz, Tante Libby Levilov-Rotenstreich | Bubby, Shmuel, Zeidy Langsam, Bubby Rimler, Ella Pinson

63: L-R Shmuel, Zeidy Langsam, Bubby Rimler, Ella Pinson, Bubby Langsam | The Rimler Family | The Rimler Family | Bubby Esther with Zeidy Langsam | Zaidy Tzvi Hirsch and Bubby Bryna Rimler | Bubby Bryna and Tante Rosie

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  • Title: Family History
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