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Family History (Copy)

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S: Anderson and Bowman Family Roots Hobart, WA

FC: The who what and where of Jake & Kate | A historical look at the Anderson and Bowman Roots

1: To my dear Aunt Sherrie whose wisdom and love for our community helped form the woman I have become. Love Always, Your niece, Angelee

2: Horgen | Lake Zurich | Mount Zimmerberg | "ridge crest" | Sihl River | Zimmerberg Village | Our story begins on the southwest side of Lake Zürich in Switzerland, on the strip of land between the lake and the Sihl River. Traveling south from the lakefront town of Horgen, you hike uphill for about a mile until you reach the ridge crest. The ground begins to drop again, sloping down toward the river, and on the far side of the valley is a low, tree covered mountain, the "Zimmerberg". To your south, about a mile and half, the tiny village of Zimmerberg | The Bowmans farming since the middle ages | overlooks the river. Though having no more than a half-dozen houses, it's been there a long time, at least since the mid fourteenth century, when a family named Buman (also spelled Bauman) lived either in the village or near it.

3: Life in the 12th and early 13th centuries was very different from today. People mainly lived in villages and farmed the land. Houses, barns sheds, and animal pens clustered around the center of the village, which was surrounded by plowed fields and pastures. Medieval society depended on the village for protection and a majority of people during these centuries called a village home. Most were born, toiled, married, had children and later died within the village, rarely venturing beyond its boundaries. The villagers or peasants did not own the land they worked on, it was held for someone more important. In the case of the Bumans, that person was the Abbess of the Fraumünster abbey. | Imperial Abbey of Fraumünster | Typical Medieval village

4: The name Bauman/Buman means peasant who farms. Sometime around 1369 a male child was born into the family. Named Ulius (the German form of Julius) he was also called "Ulie" or "Uly". Ulie himself became known as "Julius the Farmer", which does not seem a very distinctive title given that most of his neighbors were likely farmers as well. Apparently he began this occupation around age 24, because according to Swiss tax records he lived 1393-1401 at Halden near Zimmerberg, Hirzel, Switzerland. The village has long since disappeared. | Farming was hard, backbreaking work; farming tools were simple. There were sickles (with curved blades) and scythes for harvesting, metal tipped ploughs for turning over the soil and | harrows to cover up the soil when seeds had been planted. The Bumans would remain farmers for centuries.

5: Peter Buman (c.1420 - 1501) | Ulius "Uly" "Julius the Farmer" Buman (1369 - 1425) We don't know the name of Ulie's wife, or how many children he had, other than a son named Hans. He died around 1425, or about age 56, which was doing pretty well for someone of that era. Hans Buman (c.1390 - c.1420) Born in Zimmerberg, Switzerland. According to tax records, Hans Buman inherited a farm. He paid taxes from 1409 to 1420, the year he died. His was a short life (his father outlived him by five years), but he lived long enough to father at least one son, Peter. Peter's mother's name was Thelma. | Ulius "Julius the Farmer" Buman (1369 - 1425) | Hans Buman (c.1390 - c.1420) | Thelma ?

6: Peter Buman (c.1420 - 1501) Peter Buman was born in 1420, the year his father died. He married Greta Widmer around 1446, but tax records indicate that he didn't own any property until 1455. We don't know if he inherited his father's farm or started a new one of his own. It is unlikely that he received assistance from the Widmers, since the Widmer name means somebody who is renting land from a church. Peter is reported to have lived 1455-1501 at "Egg", Zimmerberg. If he lived until 1501 that would have made him 81 at the time of his death, rather astonishing for that time. Greta lived even longer, dying in 1508 at age 83. | Peter's first child is named "Uly" (presumably short for Ulius) which suggests that Peter recalled his grandfather, who probably helped to raise him for the first five years of his life. He had three more children, his daughters Triny and Anna and a son named Heini.

7: Peter Buman (c.1420 - 1501) | Greta Widmer 1425 - 1508 | Triny Buman | Anna Buman | Heini Buman | Uly Buman 1449 - 1491 | Uly Buman 1449 - 1491 Uly reportedly lived for a time in "Rennimattle" but later moved back to Zimmerberg. No such place exists today in Switzerland, so if this is correct, then it's another lost village. One source reports that his wife was named Margaretha Franz and that they were married in 1469. The name "Franz" probably means that her father or a grandfather was named Franciscus. They would have at least one child, Hans.

8: Hans Buman 1470- 1555 Hans was born in the year 1470. According to tax records, he lived 1491-1555 at "Sutersmoos", Wydenbach. My guess is that "Sutermoos" (also reported as "Luttermoss") was the name of their farm, because Wydenbach (today spelled Widenbach), a village about half mile east of Zimmerberg, is even smaller than Zimmerberg. | Hans' reported birth and death dates equate to a lifespan of 85 years. Whether true or not, he certainly lived during an eventful period of history. Switzerland had been steadily growing during the 1400s, and the Swiss victory in the Swabian War against the Swabian League of Emperor Maximilian I in 1499 amounted to de facto | independence within the Holy Roman Empire. | Hans married Verena Lehman in 1501. Verena was most likely from a Jewish banking family, which is the origins of her surname. They had at least one son - Grosshans ("Big John") - prior to her death. | Hans Buman 1470 - 1555 | Verena Lehmann 1464 - 1505 | Gross Hans Buman 1505 - 1559

9: Gross Hans Buman 1505- 1559 Gross Hans. "Big John", lived in Switzerland during a time when the Reformation morphed into the Radical Reformation with the Anabaptist movement (1525). The religious divisions within Switzerland triggered a civil war from 1529 to 1531, which ended with the battle of Kappel, fought only a few miles west of Hans' village of Wydenbach. We don't know if Hans was an Anabaptist. The movement began during his lifetime, but there is no information that indicates whether he was a follower. Grosshans moved from Wydenbach. to a village called Wuribach (today known as Hirzel), about two miles south of Wydenbach. He lived there from 1527 until his death in 1559. | A Church in Hirzel, Switzerland

10: Grosshans Buman 1505 - 1559 | Langhans Buman 1539 – 1584 We don't know Grosshans' wife's name, but they had at least four children. We are descended from his | Ann Buman (1533-) | Cleinhans Buman 1540 – 1606 | Langhans Buman 1539 – 1584 | Uly Buman (1538-) | ? c 1500s | Leonhart Bauman 1568 - 1646 Leonhart was born in Albis, Switzerland in the year 1568. In 1595 Leonhart married Barbara Bar, the daughter of Hans Bar and Kathrina Huber Bar of Hausen am Albis, a town about four miles northwest of Hirzel and located on the lower west slopes of the Albis Mountains. Hausen is also reported as the location of her death. She would returned there after Leonhart's death in 1646. If we can believe the dates given for her birth and death, she lived to the extraordinary age of 96! Leonhart is the first Buman that is | An Anababtist Church in medieval Switzerland | youngest son, Langhans ("Tall John"). Langhans "Tall John" married "Trini" Habersaat on January 01, 1567. It is possible that Trini's father was a clock maker, as Habersaat translates to "has possession of time". Tall John would have at least six children with Trini, one of which is our ancestor Leonhart Bauman. | listed as an Anabaptist. Leonhart and Barbara would live in the village of Hirzel and have 8 children, including our ancestor, Daniel. Leonhart passed away on 1 Jan 1646.

11: Langhans Buman 1539 – 1584 | Langhans Buman 1539 – 1584 | Katharina "Trini" Habersaat 1528– 1584 | Leonhart Bauman 1568 - 1646 | Rudolf Bauman ? | Anneli Bauman ? | Hans Bauman 1570 - ? | Heinrich Bauman 1573 - ? | Anna Bauman 1575 - ? | Barbara Bar 1572 - 1668 | Anna Baumann 1594 – ? | Barbeli Buman 1602 – ? | Margret Bauman 1600 – ? | Rudolph Bauman 1611 – 1673 | Hans Jagli Bauman 1605 – ? | Daniel Bauman 1596 – 1635 | The Anabaptists were heavily persecuted in Europe for their beliefs and would live privately in small villages surrounding the mountains. These Anabaptists would eventually migrate to North America, and become fundamental in forming the ideas of separation of church and state, and religious freedom. They would later become the Mennonites of New Holland, PA. | Daniel Bauman 1596 – 1635 In 1633, Daniel marries Anna Kagi from Fischenthal, Switzerland, a village north of Lake Zurich, high up in the hills. Kagi means hedge fence so Anna's family probably lived by a hedge fence. They would also move to Hirzel and have at least one child, Hans Jacob. | Anna Kaegi 1607– ? | Hans Jacob Bauman 1632 - ?

12: Hans Jacob Bauman 1632 - ? Hans Jacob Bauman was born sometime around the month of December in the year 1632 in Hirzel. Europe experience constant war during the era he was born into. It would be called the Thirty Years' War(1618–1648). This period was full of disease, famine and bankruptcy. The war ended with the Peace of Westphalia and Alsace, a town located 112 miles north of Zurich France, would be claimed by both Germany and France. After 1648, warfare had caused large numbers of the Swiss population (mainly in the countryside) to die or to flee. Between 1671 and 1711 many Anabaptist refugees came from Switzerland, notably from Bern(location of Hirzel). Hans and his family were a part of these refugees. | Hans Jacob Bauman 1632 - ? | Signing of Treaties of Osnabrück and Münster, Westphalia, modern-day Germany | Margaretha Surbeck 1630 - 1669 | Jacob Bauman 1657 - 1725 | Hans would die in Alsace, France. Before he died he would marry Margaretha Surbeck from Schaffhausen, Switzerland. She died in Schaffhausen, so it appears that | she never made it to Alsace. When she died in 1669, her son Jacob was 12 years old. | Medieval Alsace, France

14: Jacob Bowman II 1744 – 1831 | Samuel Bowman 1752 – ? | Catherine Bowman 1755 – ? | Maria Barbara Bauman 1741 – 1801 | Elizabeth Reuger Ruger 1730 – 1781 | Johann(Jacob) Bowman 1722 - 1778

15: Jacob would die on 9 Oct 1778 in Shenandoah Valley, VA. The Bowman cemetery is still in Shenandoah Valley today(right). | Jacob Bowman was born on September 23, 1722 near New Holland, PA. The Bowmans were dutch in culture and would work in the heart of Dutch Pennsylvania. Jacob probably spoke German and was of the Mennonite religion. On Aug 22, 1740 he married Elizabeth Reuger, a swiss or german immigrant. In 1768, Jacob purchased 200 acres located on the North Shenandoah River from Jonathan and Mary Langdon. Jacob and Elizabeth sold this land in 1769 to Frederick Stoner. Jacob Bowman also bought Lot #84 in the town of Woodstock. When the settlement of the estate of Jacob was made on 30 October 1779 his land consisted of 60 acres on the North River of the Shenandoah and the Lot #84 in Woodstock. | Johann(Jacob) Bowman 1722 - 1778

17: Colonial Pennsylvania | In 1828 some of the Bowmans & other families packed up their belonging s & large families to move to Indiana. These were the children & grandchildren of Jacob Sr. Samuel & Joseph remained in TN until after the death of their father, as did some of the Linebaughs. They then moved to MO taking several of the slaves w/them where some were freed before the Civil War . Only two of the children stayed in TN. The death of Elizabeth we do not know, but she was not listed w/Jacob in the 1830 census. Jacob died on May 21, 1831 at the age of 87. When Jacob died, he had lived in his new & 2nd home for 36 years. At Jacob's death, Samuel Bowman, son or brother, administrator, registered in October 1831, posted a bond of $40,000. A story passed down through the family that one of the daughters took her inheritance in a pot of gold.

18: Bowmans of Lancaster | The origins of Jacob Bowman are unknown. We know that he was part of a group of people who had moved out of PA and settled in Shenandoah Valley, VA. We also know that he most likely came with other Palinate German or Swiss decent. Some claim that Jacob is the son of Wendel Santmann Bauman 1665-1738) and Ann Herr of Bern, Switzerland. Other's claim that he was actually the grandson of Wendel and the son of Christian Bowman. While others state that he is born of another group of Bowmans unrelated. We may never know, but the following story will give you an idea of how our Bowman ancestors made it to America.

19: 1720 Lancaster, Pennsylvania

20: Aromio Leon Bowman 1881 – 1946 | Mark Bowman 1904-1959 | Ella L. Bowman 1906 – 1979 | Annie Katherine Bowman 1907 – 1907 | Maud Bowman 1909 – 1997 | Romeo J Bowman 1912 – 1951 | Lieut Claude W Bowman 1914 – 1974 | Catherine Lorraine Kate Bowman 1920 – 1987 | Mary Bowman 1922 – 1992 | Catherine Reddington 1878 – 1943 | Thomas R Bowman 1918 – 1992

21: Claude on the Tahoma Basketball team, 1933 | Kate Bowman was born on July 12, 1920 in the small pioneer town of Hobart, | Catherine Lorraine "Kate" Bowman 12 Jul 1920 - 26 Jun 1987 | WA. She and her siblings went to Maple Valley | High School and were very active in the community. | Camping in Winthrop, 1925 Back row, left to right: Floyd Ruggles, Maude Bowman, Antonia Kochevar, Ella and Mark Bowman; front row, left to right: Rome Bowman, Ace Bowman | Rome Bowman, Tahoma High School baseball team 1933 (Right) | Ella and Ace Bowman,1942

22: Aromio Romeo Leon Bowman 20 Jul 1881 - 9 Jan 1946 | On Jul 1881, Aromio was born to Thomas Hayden Bowman and Annie Elizabeth Hamilton of Miami County, Kansas. He was born into a large farming | family, having 6 brothers and 5 sisters. In 1902 Aromio, his parents, his siblings and their familes moved to Tyler, WA. They would scatter to different areas of Washington State. On September 30, 1903, Aromio married an Irish-American girl named Catherine Reddington. They would settle in Hobart, WA. | The 1910 census lists his occupation as a donkey engineer. He would continue this occupation, working at a lumber mill, most likely the Wood and Iverson Mill. When his father in law, Joe Reddington's, dance hall burned, the Wood and Iverson Hall took over the Saturday night dances. Rome operated a taxi service in his Chevrolet touring car and he ran his own garage. | On Jan. 9, 1946 Rome would die at the age of 64 in Hobart, WA.

23: Logging crew and donkey engine, Wood and Iverson Lumber Company, Hobart, n.d.

24: Thomas Hayden Bowman 1848 - 1938 | Walton Bowman 1869 – 1916 | Eugene Bowman 1871 – ? | Mary E Bowman 1872 – | Elmer E Bowman 1873 – ? | Thomas Chase Bowman 1876 – 1956 | Inez Eloise Bowman 1883 – | Malonie Bowman 1888 – 1980 | Maude Ethel Bowman 1887 – | Josephine V Bowman 1892 – | Hough H Bowman 1895 – 1945 | Annie Elizabeth Hamilton 1851 - 1928 | Roy Bowman 1886 – | Aromio Leon Bowman 1881 – 1946

25: Thomas Hayden Bowman was the youngest child born to Samuel and Jane Bowman (Meglemry) of Farley, Platte Missouri. Born on January 17th 1848, he would have been born into one of the farming families who populated the Platte | Thomas Hayden Bowman 17 JAN 1848 - 15 JUN 1938 | River area. Located on the Northwest corner of Missouri, Thomas would have grown up in an area that included parts of Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa. Jane Meglemry had a brother, Thomas Meglemry. It is very likely Thomas was named after his mother's brother. The name Hayden is a common name in the Meglemry family. Thomas Hayden Bowman married Anna Elizabeth Hamilton, who lived just south of the Bowmans. They married on 21 January 1867 in Leavenworth, Kansas. George S. Woodward, a minister of the | Presbyterian Church in Leavenworth, married them. George S. Woodward had been a minister in Platte County but left Missouri during the Civil War and moved across the Missouri River to Leavenworth County, Kansas. | 1850 & 1860 US Federal Census, Platte, MO | Leavenworth, Kansas 1860

26: In the early years of their marriage Thomas and Anna Bowman lived west of Argentine, Shawnee Township, Wyandotte County, Kansas. Anna E. Hamilton Bowman's parents then lived a few miles south of the Bowmans, west of the town of Shawnee, in Johnson County, Kansas. Although the Bowmans lived in Wyandotte County, their first child was born near Shawnee, Johnson County, Kansas (most likely at the home of Washington and Mary Hamilton). Thomas and Anna's second, third and fourth children were born west of Argentine, Wyandotte County, Kansas according to family records. Their fifth child, Thomas Chase Bowman, is listed as being born in Shawnee, Johnson County, Kansas. Their son, Romeo Leon Bowman, was born in July of 1881. Romeo lists his birthplace as Missouri in later censuses and his descendants don't have knowledge of his birthplace. (The Thomas Bowman family at this time was working at thrashing wheat and other crops. It is possible Thomas Bowman and his older sons had work thrashing just over the border in Missouri the summer of 1881 and the rest of the family went with the men.) | In January of 1882 the Bowman family moved to Marysville Township, Miami County, Kansas. Five of their children were born in Hillsdale. The family moved to Somerset, Miami County, Kansas in the early 1890's. In 1902 the Thomas Bowman family moved by train to Tyler, King County, Washington. Many of their married children also moved to Washington State around this time. The Bowmans lived in the Tyler area only a few years. | 1885 Kansas Census | 1870 Kansas Census

27: 1895 Kansas Census | Tyler, WA 1920s | At some point, Thomas and Anna lived in a small house on the property of their son-in-law and daughter, Wallace and Mary Jane Bowman Thatcher, at Port Madison (on Bainbridge Island), Kitsap County, Washington. The exact date is unknown. By 1910, the family lived in Snohomish, WA. Thomas worked as a farmer for a produce company at the age of 62. Roy(age 24) would take care of the home farm while his father was at work. His brother Hough, 12 years old, lived at home as well. Their final home was at Emander (near Everett), Snohomish County, Washington. After Anna's death in 1928 Thomas continued to live in Emander but often stayed with some of his children for long periods of time.

28: Samuel Bowman II 1820 – 1894 | George Washington Bowman 1817 – 1870 | Jacob D Bowman 1825 – 1863 | Sarah Elizabeth Bowman 1827 – 1950 | Michael Bowman 1808 – 1850 | Sarah Bright 1790 – 1831 | Henry Bowman 1831 – 1863 | Louisa Bowman 1828 – 1828 | Mary Katherine Bowman 1829 – 1847 | Samuel Bowman 1787 - 1849 | First Marriage

29: Jane Meglemry 1809 – 1880 | Louisa Bowman ? | John Maglimmery Bowman 1835 – 1913 | Edward Monroe Bowman 1838 – 1950 | Harrison Champion Bowman 1834 – 1888 | Lavinia Bowman 1840 – 1950 | Barbara Jane Bowman 1843 – 1847 | Thomas Hayden Bowman 1848 – 1938 | Second Marriage

30: Samuel Bowman 31 Dec 1787 - 11 Jun 1849 | Samuel Bowman was born on December 31, 1787 in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. He was the son of Jacob Bowman II and Elisabetha Keller from Pennsylvania. By 1812, at the age of 25, Samuel was living in Green, TN. On November 15, 1815 Samuel married his first wife, Sarah Bright, daughter of | Michael Bright Jr and Luisa(Land) of Reading, Berks, Pennsylvania. Justice of the Peace, Cornelius Newman, preceded over their wedding. Samuel would have 8 children with Sarah. Sarah died during the birth of their 8th child on June 5, 1831. In his bible notes, Michael Bright Jr. mentions that Sarah was born in the morning and confirms that Sarah died in childbirth.

31: "Sarah Bright was born the 31 day of Octobert 1790 in the morning" | "Our daughter Sarah Bright was married to Samuel Bowman on the 7 day of November 1815" | "Sarah Bowman our daughter departed this life in child bed the 5th day of June 1831"

32: children, Jane would have a total of 15 children. Samuel and Jane Meglemry Bowman and his parents, had property southwest of the little town of Farley, Platte, MO. County, Missouri. Samuel Bowman acquired land in Township 51, North Range 35 west in Section 5 on 30 October 1843 and acquired river front land in Township 52, North Range 35 west in Section 32 on 29 January 1846. (These sections of land were part of the Platte Purchase.) The land in Section 5 was most likely where Samuel and Jane Bowman had their house and where Thomas Hayden Bowman was born. Just before Samuel Bowman died on 11 June 1849, he and Jane sold their land in Section 32, 114 and 81/100 acres for $193.50, to Jacob D. Bowman, Samuel's son by Sarah Bright. This document was signed on 9 June 1849. Dr. Borden and L. P. | Samuel married his second wife, Jane Meglemry on May 14, 1833. They would have a total of 7 children. Between her step-children and her own | Marriage record of Samuel Bowman and Jane Meglimmery

33: Stiles were witnesses. L. P. Stiles also filed Samuel Bowman's Will in May 1849 as the administrator of the estate. (This property deed information was found in the indexing under Samuel Bowman | and Jacob D. Bowman in records at the Platte County courthouse, Platte City, Missouri.) All of this property was bottomland along the Missouri River. The river has changed its course over the years and these river edging sections have changed, some land now gone. | 1877 Map of Farley, Platte County, MO | (This section information can be found on an early plot map stored at the Platte County courthouse in Platte City, Missouri.)

34: Last Will and Testament | of Samuel Bowman | I, Samuel Bowman, of the County of Platte and the State of Missouri, do hereby make and publish this my last will and testament as follows... First - I desire that my funeral expenses and all my other debts be first paid --- Second - To George W. Bowman, Samuel Bowman, Michael Bowman, Jacob Bowman, Henry Bowman my sons, and Sarah Houts my daughter the above named heirs sharing a portion of property being their Mothers property, which I have given to them --- Third - Harrison Bowman, Edward Bowman, (John M. Bowman's name omitted), Thomas H. Bowman my sons and Lavina Bowman my daughter I will and bequeath that the last named heirs of this third section shall have the home place to make their support up in tell Thomas H. Bowman my youngest son becomes 21 years of age. And in addition to the home place, to have a Black girl by the name of Hiley and a Black boy by the name of Ellick (or Elleck) and two horses and two ploughs and all the

35: household furniture to hold the above tell Thomas H. Bowman the youngest son becomes twenty one years of age, when the above shall all of it be divided equally among all of my heirs --- Fourth - I will that a Black boy by the name of Adam and his wife Mirna shall have their freedom, and if they wish they may stay and help to work the home place for which they shall have their support --- Sixth - The remainder of my property I will and bequeath shall be equally divided among all my heirs at my death --- Seventh - I will to my wife Jane to have with her children her support on the home place, to have the management of the home place and to all the property left to her heirs with the home place while she remains my widow and stays with her children.Eighth - In case their should be another heir I will that the Same receive a support on the home place tell it becomes of age and receive a portion equally with the rest --- I Samuel Bowman being in a sound and disposing mind make this my last will and testament this twenty second day of May eighteen hundred and forty nine.

36: Jane Meglemry was born in North Carolina in 1809. At some point she moved to Greene, TN where she met and married Samuel Bowman, 22 years her senior, in 1833. He was a widow with 7 children of his own, his oldest only one year older than Jane at 22 years old. The youngest, Henry, was two years old. His first wife, Sarah, died giving birth to Henry. After Samuel dies in 1849, Jane stays on the home place in Platte, MO. As long as Jane did not remarry, she would be able to stay on the homeplace with her children. | 1850 Federal Census, Platte, Missouri

37: The 1850 census shows that Jane was a farmer. At the age of 41 Jane worked the family farm. She had the help of a black girl by the name of Hiley and a Black | 1860 Federal Census, Platte, Missouri | boy by the name of Ellick. In 1950 she had 5 children living with her, Harrison age 16, Edward age 12, Levina age 10, John age 14 and Hayden age 1. For some reason, John was left out of his father's will but still lived with his mother. In 1860, Edward would take over the role as the farmer since Harrison was no longer at the residence. | enslaved woman with her slaver in the mid 19th century New Orleans

38: Abraham Lincoln is elected president in 1861. The first major Civil War battle west of the Mississippi River was on August 10, 1861 at Wilson's Creek, Missouri. Jane and the Bowmans lived in an area that supported both sides of the war and changed hands many times. | The Battle of Carthage in Missouri, in 1861 during the American Civil War. Illustration from Civil War Harper's Weekly.

39: By 1870, Jane would still remain at the homeplace. She lived with her youngest son, Thomas Hayden, his wife Annie and their one year old son, Walton. The rest of the family still lived nearby, in Platte County. Sometime between 1870 and 1880, Jane would move 30 miles south to Shawnee, Kansas and live with her Eldest son, John Bowman and his family. She dies soon after. | 1870 and 1880 Federal Census

40: Rebecca Bowman 1770 – 1842 | Henry Bowman 1774 – 1834 | Abraham Bowman 1768 – 1860 | Elizabeth Bowman 1783 – 1866 | Johann(Jacob) Bowman II 1744 - 1831 | Abraham Bowman 1792 – ?

41: Nancy Bowman 1772 – ? | Jacob Bowman III 1774 – 1840 | Elizabeth Mary Keller 1753 – 1806 | Samuel Bowman 1787 – 1849 | Barbara Ann Bowman 1785 – 1861 | Joseph Newman Bowman 1801 – 1872

42: Johann Bowman II was born in on May 15, 1744 in New Holland, Lancaster, PA to Jacob Bowman and Elizabeth Reuger. The American colony of Pennsylvania had complete religious freedom and attracted many peasants from the Palatinate (western Germany) fleeing persecution. These peasant descendants would use their skill to transformed this | Typical Colonial Farm | region into a rich farming country. The Bowmans were one of these families. Like many of the "Shenandoah Deitsch", Jacob would move with his parents into the Shenandoah River Valley of Virginia in the year 1752. | The Native American's of the area tolerated the quakers and Mennonites of PA because they were very peaceful. | Johann(Jacob) Bowman II 1744 - 1831

43: It is here that he would marry Elizabeth Mary Keller on November 25, 1767. They were married by a traveling preacher ranging out of the state of MD. The Rev. Charles Lange returned to Frederick County, MD where he | Shenandoah Valley, oil on canvas, William Louis Sonntag, Sr., 1859–1860. Virginia Historical Society | In 1779 young Jacob Tennessee. | recorded their marriage in the Evangelical Reformed Church records. The Bowmans | later attended the Lutheran Church. | received 203 acres from his father-in-law, George Keller. He later sells this land while living in Greene County,

44: Except for a few records, little is known of the lives of the family during/after the Revolutionary War. The lure of a new frontier with fertile untouched land may have prompted the Bowmans & several other families from Shenandoah County, VA to move to Green County, TN in 1795. They probably moved in a group, which was common practice. To this new land came Jacob & his wife Elizabeth with their children to start again, build cabins, clear land, plant crops, etc. They were 50+ years of age at this time & had lived in Shenandoah most of their lives. The children likely ranged from 5-25. Jacob could read & write, Elizabeth could not. Their older sons must have attended school or were taught at home. Only the youngest son signed his name with a mark. The busy years after the move may have prevented any schooling for him. They sold VA land in 1797. Jacob spent quite a bit of time buying & selling land. The amount of acreage he owned changed yearly. In 1811 he had 1040 acres and 5 slaves. In 1812 he had 1340 acres and so on. In 1823 he deeded some land to his children. By 1828 his acreage was down to 921 acres on Lick Creek & that year he deeded 158 acres to his son- in-law & daughter, Daniel & Rebecca Linebaugh.

45: Inventory of the Estate of Jacob Bowman | A memorandem or Inventory of the personal goods and effects of Jacob Bowman late of the County of Greene and State of Tennessee deceased, taken the 21st May 183. Towit, Seven man slaves towit, Daniel, Thomas, William, Adam, Elijan, Alexander, John. Six women slaves towit, Hannah, Phebe, Mime, Grace Lucia,Ilerena. Six head of the horse kind, ten wagons, five pair of horse gears. thirty three head of cattle, small and grown ones, fifty three head of hogs, pigs and sows, forty geese, thirty ducks, three bar share plows, five shovel and bull tohgue plows, two sickles, two mattocks, one sprouting hoe , one foot adze, one pick axe, one cross cut saw, one broad axe, one handsaw, two drawing knives, three screw augers, and one barrel auger, three chisels, nine corn hoes, eleven choping axes, five guns, two set of dog irons, one fire shovel, one dirt shovel, two dung forks, four hoops of old wagon tires, one grind stone, three big kettles, one small brass kettle, one brass skillet, one copper tea kettle, five dutch ovens, eight pots, two skillets, one baking iron, three scythes, two thetstones, one still and six tubs, one barrel and three kegs, two weaving looms, one pair warping cards,a set of spools, five big wheels, one bearough, one cupboard, five tables and one candlestand, five spinning wheels and one reel, one chest, two mans saddles, one wornan saddle, two sets of measures, thirteen pot hooks, one windmill, one cutting box, one carrying knife and steel, eight sides of leather, ten tubs, three pieces of apper (upper ?) leather, one box with a slider, three silver watches, four Bee stands, five pair of steelyards, one pair of gold ? * weighing scales and some weights, two hammers, one scythe anvill, one horse brush, four pewter basons, six pewter dishes, fifteen pewter plates, eight tin pans, five tin cups, one quart and pint, three tin buckets , two tin coffee pots, four glass bottles, one looking glass, five steel traps, two razors and case, five pair bedsteads, four beds and furniture, sixteen yards and three quarters of fulled woolen cloth, two old frying pans, one halter chain, two old plowshares, two smoothing irons, three flax hackles, and one craping hackle, an old English *Law Book and two Dictionaries, one pot, two iron wedges, one iron tooth harrow, one log chain, one dirk (?) and staff, one pellon (2) of dried buckskin.

46: Hans Jacob Bauman 1632 - ? | Margaretha Surbeck 1630 - 1669? | Jacob Bauman 1656 - 1725 | Anna Rigers, ? | Christian Bauman 1699 - 1764

48: Oskar Jake Anderson 1908 - 1986 | Oskar Jake Anderson 1908 - 1986 | Frank Herman Andersson 1863 – 1948 | Oskar Jake Anderson 1908 - 1986 | Emma Mathilda Finer 1868 – 1950 | Anders Jonasson 1822 – 1896 | Anna Sophia Gustafsdotter 1829 – ? | Anders Jonasson 1822 – 1896 | Jonas Andersson 1793 – 1836 | Anna Cajsa Lorsdotter 1802 – ? | Anders Jonsson Sallin 1755 – ? | Martha Jonsdotter 1757 – ? | Jonas Mansson 1730 – ? | Anna Nilsdotter 1722 – ? | Ingebor Jonsdotter 1710 – | Mans Mansson 1699 –

49: The Andersons Swedish Farmers and Pioneers

50: Aromio Leon Bowman 1881 – 1946 | Mark Bowman 1904-1959 | Ella L. Bowman 1906 – 1979 | Maud Bowman 1909 – 1997 | Romeo J Bowman 1912 – 1951 | Lieut Claude W Bowman 1914 – 1974 | Thomas R Bowman 1918 – 1992 | Catherine Lorraine Kate Bowman 1920 – 1987 | Mary Bowman 1922 – 1992 | Catherine Reddington 1878 – 1943 | Annie Katherine Bowman 1907 – 1907

52: Emma Mathilda Finer took a ship from Gothenburg, Sweden to Liverpool, England. She left Liverpool aboard the S.S. Pavonia on September 6, 1898. After arriving in Boston, MA she would make her way to Seattle, WA. | Gothenburg, Sweden

53: SS Pavonia

54: Frank and Emma added 6 more children to their family. | Elma T (1903-1994) | Carl R (1906-1991) | Frank Pike (1907-) | Ole (1910-)

55: Frank and Emma added 6 more children to their family. | Frank and Emma added 6 more children to their family. | Martin A (1884-1969) Margaret "Maggie" (1897-1984) | Arthur (1911-) | Oscar "Jake" (1908 - 1986)

56: The Orlando and Rollo are two fine new screw-steamers built to the order of Messrs. Thomas Wilson, Sons, and Co., steamship owners, of Hull, expressly for the passenger trade between Hull and Gothenburg. They will make the sea passage in forty hours, which will furnish the shortest and most direct communication with Sweden and Norway. Both these steamers are of the following dimensions: length, 260 ft.; breadth, 32 ft.; and | [Illustrated London News, Aril 2, 1870 p. 350] | STEAMERS FOR SWEDEN AND NORWAY | depth, 19 ft; tonnage, by register, 1500 tons. Each vessel has five water-tight bulkheads and a long deck-house, covering the engines and boilers. The saloon and sleeping-berths are well arranged for the comfort of the passengers in the centre of the vessel, so as to avoid the motion of the seas as much as possible. The sleeping-berths are large and comfortable, and mostly for only two passengers in one state-room; but there are also family cabins and ladies' cabins, with every comfort and convenience . These cabins, being all on the upper deck, will have excellent ventilation. The accommodation is forty-two first-class passengers and thirty second-class passengers. The engines are compound, with all the modern improvements, surface condensing, and will work up to 1200-horse power. The vessels and engines were built by Messrs. C. and W. Earle, of Hull, who are building also two other vessels for Messrs. Wilson, suitable for the Suez Canal. These new vessels will increase Messrs. Wilson's fine fleet of steamers to twenty-nine, most of which are nearly new, with engines and boilers of an improved class. Two others are building much larger than the Orlando and the Rollo. In the trial trip of the | Orlando, with a company of ladies and gentlemen invited by the owners, down the Humber and outside Spurn Head, the vessel attained a speed of twelve knots and a half an hour. The ease and grace of her movements, the comfort and elegance of her passenger accommodation, and the performance of her steam-engines, were much admired. Messrs. Wier and Co.'s atmospheric telegraph is fitted for steering and for ... | Orlando, with a company of ladies and gentlemen invited by the owners, down the Humber and outside Spurn Head, the vessel attained a speed of twelve knots and a half an hour. The ease and grace of her movements, the comfort and elegance of her passenger accommodation, and the performance of her steam-engines, were much admired. Messrs. Wier and Co.'s atmospheric telegraph is fitted for steering and for ... | Frank Herman Anderson left Gothenburg, Sweden on July 29th, 1881. He first traveled to the Hull, England via the S.S. Orlando., then boarded a ship for New York.

57: depth, 19 ft; tonnage, by register, 1500 tons. Each vessel has five water-tight bulkheads and a long deck-house, covering the engines and boilers. The saloon and sleeping-berths are well arranged for the comfort of the passengers in the centre of the vessel, so as to avoid the motion of the seas as much as possible. The sleeping-berths are large and comfortable, and mostly for only two passengers in one state-room; but there are also family cabins and ladies' cabins, with every comfort and convenience . These cabins, being all on the upper deck, will have excellent ventilation. The accommodation is forty-two first-class passengers and thirty second-class passengers. The engines are compound, with all the modern improvements, surface condensing, and will work up to 1200-horse power. The vessels and engines were built by Messrs. C. and W. Earle, of Hull, who are building also two other vessels for Messrs. Wilson, suitable for the Suez Canal. These new vessels will increase Messrs. Wilson's fine fleet of steamers to twenty-nine, most of which are nearly new, with engines and boilers of an improved class. Two others are building much larger than the Orlando and the Rollo. In the trial trip of the | STEAMERS FOR SWEDEN AND NORWAY

59: Emma Mathilda Finer Emma was born the 2nd of July in the year 1868. Her family lived in the village Hjalmseryd, Sweden, a small village located in the highlands of Smaland. While the area is rich in bogs and lakes, the land is barren except for the coastal regions. Emma was the second youngest of 8 children. They lived a very poor lifestyle and many of Emma's siblings would move to America for a new start. Emma would eventually move close to her brother, Karl August Finer,

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Angelee Anderson
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