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S: UGANDA 2010

BC: Summer International Seminar 2010

FC: International Community Development | Uganda 2010

1: 22 Days. 6 Students. 2 Professors. 1 Amazing journey. The following pages show the chronicles of how Africa transformed us. | IINTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT UGANDA 2010

2: This group is composed of students interested in Community Development (CD). CD is a multi- disciplinary way to approach society. It considers the working systems operating to achieve the economic, social, political, and built well being of a community. Students majoring in CD engage in courses often relating to the United States. This is the first annual Ugandan seminar exploring CD with an international lens. | This group is composed of students interested in Community Development (CD). CD is a multi- disciplinary way to approach society. It considers the working systems operating to achieve the economic, social, political, and built well being of a community. Students majoring in CD engage in courses often relating to the United States. This is the first annual Ugandan seminar exploring CD with an international lens. | This group is composed of students interested in Community Development (CD). CD is a multidisciplinary approach to social thinking. It considers systems operating to achieve the economic, social, political, and built well being of a community. Students majoring in CD engage in courses often relating to the United States. This is the first annual Ugandan seminar exploring CD with an international lens.

3: Themes included: - Health as a development Issue - Official development AID and land policy - Millennium Development goals - Natural resource protection and management - Sustainable agriculture/ Biodiversity preservation - Eco-tourism cooperatives - Micro-enterprise/Economic development - Gender issues - Democracy and development - Education systems - International volunteering | In the field, we observed a variety of sustainable development projects; attended lectures by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO's), government representatives, directors and staff of NGOs; traveled through various environmental regions; hosted guest organizational representatives and local stakeholders over informal lunch/dinners; and were hosted in home stays by local rural villagers. Along the way, for documentation we kept a personal journal, field notebook, and took photographs to record observations. Each day, we elected day leaders to act as student ambassadors, introducing the group and formally thanking our contacts.

4: Entebbe June 19, 2010 Our arrival and 10 hour time zone change adjustment

5: Social and Economic Health Study: Market: Grasshoppers & Talapia

6: Children at the Market | Outdoor bike mechanic shop

7: Paloney Anyone? Not Tonight Honey | How about some milk and yogurt in a bag? | SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES: Milk bags --> into flower pots.

8: Kireka Home is the only home for children with special needs near Jinja. Most of the children who attend the home are double orphans who have been abandoned because of their disability. This home needs continual contributions to help children like these.

10: TASO - The AIDS Support Organization Jinja, Uganda | Transparency, or, an organization's rules, regulations, and practices must be clear and accessible to any interested party. Maintaining transparency provides a wealth of benefits to the local community. Not only does it aid in discouraging corruption but it also promotes accountability along with sustainable and equitable development. TASO is a shining example of transparent practices. It's a membership organization governed by a Board of Trustees. This Board is comprised of volunteers who are periodically elected by the General Assembly of members. A portion of TASO’s members are also a part of the local HIV/Aids community. The organization promotes a bottom-up design to ensure they provide the best services for its community. Similarly, clients are guaranteed seats at all levels of governance, guaranteeing equal opportunities in staff recruitment and program implementation. | TASO recognizes how issues are interconnected. TASO understands that HIV/AIDS affects issues relating to agriculture and gender, not just health. TASO has developed rich holistism and delivers not only education on HIV/AIDS prevention and management, but also considers how the disease may impact relationships, the local economy, and the overall success of the community. They established educational and counseling programs that deliver in song and dance; community meetings; one-on-one demonstrations; and through media outlets such as radio programs, newspapers, and billboards. TASO has developed the TEACH program to provide in-depth training to government health centers as well as international students and organizations. The TEACH program serves as a way for TASO to learn from others, allowing them to focus on HIV/AIDS at a local level, as well as a global level. This in turn, also helps them to discover other practices that could be incorporated into their existing programs.

11: The strings that connect us all | Soft Power's Organizational struggles prove that non-indigenous organizations face greater challenges and often lack the ability to sustain themselves. An example of foreign funded projects predominantly funded by external sources would be Soft Power Energy. Similar to many newly established organizations, Soft Power is externally funded and depends on that stream of money to operate. Upon our visit, we observed a few of the struggles that the director has to overcome due to an off-site foreign director

12: National Museum Kampala - our Tour Guide | National Museum Kampala - Sustainable transport | Kampala traffic, long horn cows on truck, men on long horn cows

13: Bujagali Dam | The Raft lost all it's passengers | <- Nile River ->

14: Rubbish in the right spot...except, did someone call a taxi? | Technology does not require complicated machines; it requires appropriate techniques, knowledge, and labor. In developing nations it's more important to utilize excess labor than to create machines that require foreign parts, operational expertise, and technical know-how to administer. Uganda is far from being developed but there are many organizations that are relying on indigenous knowledge and simple, sustainable technology to create a better place to live. The Jinja recycling plant, in operation for less than a year, represents a development project that ameliorates resource damage on environmentally important land. It used to be a 22 acre illegal dump site. Today its 47 workers turn garbage into money by locally selling the resulting compost and plastic bottles, and reusing resources before burning them. It produces 6 day compost piles with local cow dung. Though this recycling project uses some foreign aid loans allocated by the municipality, it optimized the funds received and utilized local expertise during their development process. This operation proves a good example of the self-help and technical assistance-- community development. | SUSTAINABILITY: Localized technical know-how

15: Bead For Life: Building stronger women through business education. Bead for Life only takes women with a will to work and who live in severe poverty.

16: Makerere University, Kampala Department of Technology | Dr. Moses heads the department. He receives grants to develop appropriate technology. | Appropriate technology is the practical know-how and tool use that utilizes the least amount of resources, considers local culture and ethics, economics, social impact, and has a low impact on the environment. Dr. Moses Musaazi at Makerere University is an excellent example of using localized resources and solutions. His projects fit the community's existing local natural resources. He partners with UNICEF and other outside organizations to disperse sanitary napkins to refugee camps. This partnership optimizes the work that the refugee organizations accomplish, employs local human capital, and also founded a sanitary napkin factory that is self sustaining through product sales. Local culture and ethics are important aspects of appropriate technology because they consider indigenous knowledge, attitudes, values, goals and practices. A technology that makes such accommodations will be perceived as good and will also be well accepted. Identifying a need and finding a culturally sensitive solution can be difficult. Moses Musaazi found this solution in a granery. The granary utilizes local materials, is not visually intrusive, and serves a purpose that is well accepted and beneficial to the local community.

17: Makerere Projects: Water Storage Water Purifying Brick Making Solar Lights Paper recycling Paper Making Maka Pads Medicine Dosages

18: On the [dirt] road again. | Like a true Portlander... Checkin out the locally farmed coffee beans. -->

19: Fort Portal- Waterfall Hike --> | Peace Corps Main Office in Kampala, Uganda

20: The "bazungu" just having some fun

21: As the concept of partnership is strongly manifested in the organization's efforts to engage and recognize others, bringing in indigenous knowledge has been pivotal among many organizations. The Toro Botanical Gardens (TBG), a local CBO, is a group of conservationists that invite local herbalist to discuss best practices and uses of herbal medicine. Through this process, TBG has instituted research tools that test the effectiveness of the medicinal plants. In addition, TBG has partnered with educational institutions abroad for its research needs while still maintaining nurseries of exotic trees in these institutions | The tree platforms were a hit with our group! | Toro Botanical Gardens in Fort Portal

22: Ruwenzori Guest House - Fort Portal

23: Mountains of the Moon University | "While the United States has the pleasure of walking, Uganda must run to catch up." -Vice Chancellor, on Community Development in Uganda | "We are still pioneers in so many senses. Ownership of the University is in the hands of the community." -Vice Chancellor | Ugandan University: Community Development Bachelor's Degree

24: Fort Portal Basket Weavers Abdi & Mr. Ford helped the women. The van was packed, we fit 8 extra women in.

25: Fort Portal Bee Keepers & Free afternoon

26: Kinkizi Rice Factory & Kayonza Tea Factory. The little naked baby was the key keeper. Mug shots while waiting to go into the tea factory. | Lesson on Micro-enterprise and impromptu dancing. (Next Page)

29: The beauty, wildlife of Uganda

30: William's new PSU hat - time to remove UCLA! | The little one was saying "I like sweets," but Professor White was without. | 4th of July in Kanungu at Sheila's Home

31: International Seminar Participants

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