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Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

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S: Recycled Spark Plugs By Julian

FC: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Carefully Handcrafted Models Made From Recycled Material

1: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Julian Metheringham Founder and Creator

2: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

3: World War I Aircraft | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

4: Red Baron | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

5: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (2 May 1892 – 21 April 1918), also widely known as the Red Baron, was a German fighter pilot with the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkrfte) during World War I. He is considered the ace-of-aces of that war, being officially credited with 80 air combat victories, more than any other pilot. Originally a cavalryman, Richthofen transferred to the Air Service in 1915, becoming one of the first members of Jasta 2 in 1916. He quickly distinguished himself as a fighter pilot, and during 1917 became leader of Jasta 11 and then the larger unit Jagdgeschwader 1 (better known as the "Flying Circus"). By 1918, he was regarded as a national hero in Germany, and was very well known by the other side. Richthofen was shot down and killed near Amiens on 21 April 1918. There has been considerable discussion and debate regarding aspects of his career, especially the circumstances of his death. He remains quite possibly the most widely-known fighter pilot of all time, and has been the subject of many books and films.

6: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Fokker DR 1

7: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Fokker Dr 1 (Dr standing for Dreidecker or 3 wings) was one of the most famous planes of World War One. This is probably because it was associated with the Red Baron. The Fokker Dr 1 was 5.77m long, 2.95m high. It had a wingspan of 7.19m. The Fokker Dr 1's airframe was made out of steel tubing that was covered in aircraft doped canvas. When it was empty, it weighed 405kg. It had one 80kw engine and could fly a maximum speed of 185Km/H and fly a maximum time of 1 hour and 30 minutes. It could fly at a maximum altitude of 14,000ft. Like most planes in World War One, the Fokker Dr 1 had a rotary engine. The propeller was bolted directly onto the engine and the engine and the propeller would rotate together. The Fokker Dr 1 had one open cockpit, which could hold one pilot. The Fokker Dr 1 had two machine guns with an intercepting gear that was designed to fire bullets through the propeller arc without hitting the blades. The Fokker Dr 1 was a smaller plane compared to other planes of World War One; also it was not as fast as most planes. When the Fokker Dr 1 was first came into service, the enemy thought the Fokker Dr 1 was just a huge joke until pilots like Werner Voss, showed what it could do in combat. Flying a prototype, Voss shot down 10 British aircraft in six days of aerial combat in September 1917. Only 320 Fokker Dr 1's were made in World War One, so no Fokker Dr 1 is still around today, there are only replicas.

8: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Nieuport 28 c

9: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | R.A.F. SE 5a

10: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | An agile, highly maneuverable biplane, the Sopwith F.1 Camel accounted for more aerial victories than any other Allied aircraft during World War I. Credited with destroying 1,294 enemy aircraft, it was called the Camel due to the humped fairing over its twin machine guns. Much like a real camel, this aircraft could turn and bite you. Noted for its tendency to kill inexperienced flyers, many pilots feared its vicious spin characteristics. Until sufficient speed was developed during takeoff, Camel pilots maintained full right rudder to counteract the torque the rotary engine. Failure to do so often resulted in a ground loop with the Camel crashing on its starboard wingtip. During World War I, 413 pilots died in combat and 385 pilots died from non-combat related causes while flying the Sopwith Camel. "A great number of trainee pilots had been killed learning to fly this machine, as its tricks took some learning, although they were really simple to overcome. Its main trouble was that owing to its very small wingspan, and its purposely unstable characteristics, coupled with the gyroscopic effect of a rotating engine and propeller, it flipped into a spin very easily at low speeds. Consequently, in landing and taking off, a tremendous number of fatal accidents occurred, and a general feeling of dislike for the machine was prevalent. It really had people frightened." Arthur Cobby On 4 June 1917, Canadian ace Alexander Shook became the first ace to shoot down an enemy aircraft with the Sopwith Camel. Canadian ace Roy Brown was flying a Camel when he was credited with shooting down Manfred von Richtofen. With 54 victories, Canadian Donald MacLaren scored more victories with the Camel than any other ace.

11: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Sopwith Camel

12: Tiger Moth | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

13: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The De Havilland Tiger Moth was designed as a primary trainer for the RAF in 1931. During the subsequent fifteen years, the model DH82 was to become the foremost aircraft design flown by the Commonwealth's military and civilian pilots. The suitability of this aeroplane for primary training resulted in the production of more than 9000 for the RAF and RCAF. Of these, 1784 were built in Canada under license from 1937 to 1944. The Tiger Moth was one of several training aircraft that made an enormous contribution to the BCATP. From 1938 to 1948 the RCAF employed more than 1500 of these machines. They were used for wireless instruction, bombing and gunnery, photographic reconnaissance and flying training. In fact, the Tiger Moth was one of two kinds of elementary trainer flown at this airport (Mount Hope), which was the site of 10 EFTS. The CWH Tiger Moth was manufactured at Downsview (North York) , Ontario, in 1942. It saw service at Goderich, Ontario, and Windsor Mills, PQ, until 1945, when it was sold to the RCAF Association (RCAFA). The aircraft was disassembled and stored for more than 25 years before a five-year restoration project began. Late in 1977, the restoration was completed and the Tiger Moth returned to the skies.

14: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Bi-Planes

15: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | A biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two superimposed main wings. The Wright brothers' Wright Flyer used a biplane design, as did most aircraft in the early years of aviation. While a biplane wing structure has a structural advantage, it produces more drag than a similar monoplane wing. Improved structural techniques and materials and the quest for greater speed made the biplane configuration obsolete for most purposes by the late 1930s.

16: World War II Aircraft | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

17: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

18: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Avro Anson

19: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Avro Anson

20: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Corsair F.4.U

21: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Curtiss Warhawk

22: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | DC 3 Burma

23: Douglas Dakota C.47 | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Douglas C-47 Skytrain or Dakota is a military transport aircraft that was developed from the Douglas DC-3 airliner. It was used extensively by the Allies during World War II and remained in front line operations through the 1950s with a few remaining in operation to this day.

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25: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

26: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Flying Box Car

27: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Hercules

28: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Harvard

29: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Halifax

31: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Presentation of the Halifax model to the Trenton Museum (model is mounted on an actual piece of debris from the Halifax bomber that was restored between 1995 and 2009) National Air Force Museum of Canada Between 1995 and 2009 the National Air Force Museum of Canada aircraft restoration team completely restored a World War II Halifax Bomber (NA337) which is on permanent display in the museum.

32: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Hurricane

33: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force (RAF). Although largely overshadowed by the Supermarine Spitfire, the aircraft became renowned during the Battle of Britain, accounting for 60% of the RAF's air victories in the battle, and served in all the major theatres of the Second World War. The 1930s design evolved through several versions and adaptations, resulting in a series of aircraft which acted as interceptor-fighters, fighter-bombers (also called "Hurribombers"), and ground support aircraft. Further versions known as the Sea Hurricane had modifications which enabled operation from ships. Some were converted as catapult-launched convoy escorts, known as "Hurricats". More than 14,000 Hurricanes were built by the end of 1944 (including about 1,200 converted to Sea Hurricanes and some 1,400 built in Canada by the Canada Car and Foundry).

34: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Lancaster

35: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Probably the most famous Allied bomber of World War II, the Lancaster had impressive flying characteristics and operational performance. The Lancaster was the RAF's only heavy bomber capable of carrying the 12,000-lb Tallboy and 22,000-lb Grand Slam bombs. The aircraft demonstrated superbly its right to fame with the daring and precise raids on the Ruhr dams in May 1943, and also the sinking of the German battleship Tirpitz in November 1944. Thousands of Canadian aircrew and other personnel served with the RCAF and RAF's Lancaster squadrons in England; and thousands of Canadians at home worked at Victory Aircraft in Malton (Toronto), Ontario, where they produced over 400 Lancaster Mk X's. In total, more than 7300 Lancasters rolled off the production lines in Britain and Canada. Only two still fly. The CWH Museum has dedicated its Mynarski Memorial Lancaster to the memory of Pilot Officer Andrew Charles Mynarski, VC, of 419 (Moose) Squadron, 6 (RCAF) Group. Mynarski won 6 Group's only Victoria Cross, the Commonwealth's highest award for gallantry in battle. On the night of 12/13 June 1944, his Lancaster X was shot down by a Luftwafffe night fighter. As the bomber plunged earthwards, Mynarski, his flying clothing afire, tried in vain to free his trapped rear gunner from the jammed rear turret. Miraculously, the gunner lived to relate the story of Mynarski's bravery. Unfortunately, Mynarski died from his severe burns.

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38: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Messerschmitt

39: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Mosquito Bomber D.H.9

40: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Mustang P 51 (British)

41: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | N3N Canary

42: TimeZone.com July 19, 2010 Vendors from all parts of Southern Ontario have been setting up their outdoor market stands in the downtown part of Brampton, known as the Four-Corners, for the past twenty-four years. Offering for sale seasonal vegetables, baked-goods, crafts, and fresh fruits directly to the public. The market runs every Saturday from mid-June to October. You can show up early Saturday morning (by 7:00 am) to early afternoon. This past weekend included an arts & craft show, live music, and an annual classic cars parade. Some photos from the weekend to share. One vendor I spoke to is Mr. Julian Metheringham. Julian has taken his hobby on the road. He's been creating model airplanes and cars for over ten years. He does all the sandblasting, painting and assembly of these miniatures by hand. L.Joel | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

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44: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Spitfire

45: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft which was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries throughout the Second World War. The Spitfire continued to be used as a front line fighter and in secondary roles into the 1950s. It was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft, and was the only British fighter in production throughout the war. The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death from cancer in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith became chief designer. The Spitfire's elliptical wing had a thin cross-section, allowing a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane.[8] Speed was seen as essential to carry out the mission of home defence against enemy bombers. During the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire was perceived by the public as the RAF fighter of the battle, whereas in fact, the more numerous Hurricane actually shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Luftwaffe. The Spitfire units did, however, have a lower attrition rate and a higher victory to loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes. After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire became the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber, carrier-based fighter, and trainer. It was built in many variants, using several wing configurations. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was adaptable enough to use increasingly more powerful Merlin and the later Rolls-Royce Griffon engines; the latter was eventually able to produce 2,035 hp (1,520 kW).

46: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Texan

47: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Wellington

48: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Westland Lysander

49: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Westland Lysander was a British army co-operation and liaison aircraft produced by Westland Aircraft used immediately before and during the Second World War. After becoming obsolete in the army co-operation role, the aircraft's exceptional short-field performance enabled clandestine missions using small, unprepared airstrips behind enemy lines to place or recover agents, particularly in occupied France. Like other British army air co-operation aircraft it was given the name of a mythical or legendary leader, in this case the Spartan general Lysander.

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51: Civil Aircraft | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

52: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Cessna

53: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Cessna

54: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | De Havilland Chipmunk

55: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | De Havilland Chipmunk

56: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Jumbo 747 & Shuttle

57: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Lear Jet

58: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Lockhead L. 1011

59: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | North Star

60: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Ski Plane

61: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Twin Otter

62: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

63: Jets | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

64: Avro Arrow | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

65: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Avro Arrow was born out of the neccessity for the protection of Canada. During the height of the Cold War (1950's) era, the soviets had introduced new long range bombers, that were capable of flying over the North Pole to attack North America. This was a very serious threat as the continent lived in fear of a surprise nuclear attack. Its role was to replace the Avro Canada CF-100 Canuck as a supersonic all weather interceptor. Canada's then current fighter, the CF-100 Canuck, was a sub mach aircraft and not capable of filling this need so the design of the CF-105 Avro Arrow was implemented in 1953. Production was started and less then 4 years later, the Arrow was completed. Roll out was October 4, 1957. First flight was March 25 1958. A source of national pride, the Arrow incorporated advanced technical innovations and became a symbol of Canadian excellence. One of the finest achievements in Canadian aviation history, the delta wing Avro Canada CF-105 Arrow was never allowed to fulfill its mission. The Arrow weapons platform along with the Iroquois engine was cancelled by the Conservative Diefenbaker government February 20, 1959, less then 3 weeks before the MK2 Arrow was to take flight.

66: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Blackbird

67: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Lockheed SR-71 "Blackbird" was an advanced, long-range, Mach 3+ strategic reconnaissance aircraft.[1] It was developed as a black project from the Lockheed A-12 reconnaissance aircraft in the 1960s by the Lockheed Skunk Works. Clarence "Kelly" Johnson was responsible for many of the design's innovative concepts. During reconnaissance missions the SR-71 operated at high speeds and altitudes to allow it to outrace threats. If a surface-to-air missile launch was detected, the standard evasive action was simply to accelerate and outrun the missile. The SR-71 served with the U.S. Air Force from 1964 to 1998. Although 12 of the 32 aircraft built were destroyed in accidents, none were lost to enemy action.[3][4] The SR-71 was unofficially named the Blackbird, and called the Habu by its crews, referring to an Okinawan species of pit viper.[5] Since 1976, it has held the world record for the fastest air-breathing manned aircraft, a record previously held by the YF-12.

68: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | The Avro CF-100 "Canuck" was the RCAF's second operational jet fighter replacing the de Havilland Vampire. They patrolled the skies over North America and Western Europe from 1953-1981. The main role was the interception of Soviet aircraft that penetrated Canadian and Allied airspace. The CF-100 was the first fighter designed and built in large quantities in Canada. A total of 692 aircraft were produced in the different "Marks" (MK) with variants in each. The prototype (FB-D), flew in 1950 powered by two Rolls-Royce Avon gas turbines.

69: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | CF 100

70: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Canadian C17

71: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | C17 Transport

72: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | CF 18 Hornet

73: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Concord

74: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

75: Other Models | Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian

76: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Rescue Helicopter

77: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Military Helicopter

78: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Curtiss Seagull

79: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Zenith

80: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Russian Aircraft

81: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Piper

82: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Dash 8

83: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Falcon

84: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Formula 1 Race Car

85: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | Steam Tractor

86: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | U Boat

87: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian | In Progress

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  • Title: Recycled Spark Plugs by Julian
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  • Started: about 5 years ago
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