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The Custom of our Country

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BC: The End!

FC: Emily Zydlewski's Project on. . . The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton | Emily Zydlewski's Project on. . . The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton | Emily Zydlewski's Project on .. . The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton

1: The Custom of the Country was published by Edith Wharton in 1913. Some aspects of Wharton's life are reflected in the book! | The Custom of the Country was published by Edith Wharton in 1913. Some aspects of Wharton's life are reflected in the book! | The Custom of the Country was published by Edith Wharton in 1913. Some aspects of Wharton's life are reflected in the book!

2: Edith Wharton (1862- 1937) | Born in New York City of an elite family. Her poems were first published in 1878. Women weren't expected to become writers, so she became an embarrassment to her family. Married Edward Wharton in 1885, but divorced soon after. | Born in New York City of an elite family. Her poems were first published in 1878. Women weren't expected to become writers, so she became an embarrassment to her family. Married Edward Wharton in 1885, but divorced soon after. | Edith Wharton (1862- 1937)

3: Many of her works, including this one, contain stories of unhappy marriages. She spent a lot of time in Europe, and treated "old New York" with nostalgia and shrewd criticism. | Many of her works, including this one, contain stories of unhappy marriages. She spent a lot of time in Europe, and treated "old New York" with nostalgia and shrewd criticism.

4: Realism! | Realism focuses on humans being flawed, and describing details of everyday life such as, how people dressed, spoke, and ate. | Realism focuses on humans being flawed, and describing details of everyday life such as, how people dressed, spoke, and ate.

5: Every small detail is recorded in "The Custom of the Country" all throughout the book, especially in how Wharton describes the social classes, and how she describe Undine's various homes. | Every small detail is recorded in "The Custom of the Country" all throughout the book, especially in how Wharton describes the social classes, and how she describe Undine's various homes.

6: Characterization . . . Undine Spragg- A beautiful young woman who is used to always getting what she wants. | Characterization . . . Undine Spragg- A beautiful young woman who is used to always getting what she wants.

7: Our "anti-heroine" shows how divorce has decreased in significance in America by having three husbands and an affair during the course of this book. | Our "anti-heroine" shows how divorce has decreased in significance in America by having three husbands and an affair during the course of this book.

8: 1. Elmer Moffatt- Undine's first husband whom she elopes with while engaged to another man. | 1. Elmer Moffatt- Undine's first husband whom she elopes with while engaged to another man.

9: Her father forces her to annull the marriage because Moffatt is not very successful, yet . . . | Her father forces her to annull the marriage because Moffatt is not very successful, yet . . .

10: 2. Ralph Marvell- Undine's second husband whom she met through mutual friend, Mr. Popple. They have a son together, Paul, but Ralph can't support Undine's spending needs so she divorces him | $$$$$$$ | 2. Ralph Marvell- Undine's second husband whom she met through mutual friend, Mr. Popple. They have a son together, Paul, but Ralph can't support Undine's spending needs so she divorces him | 2. Ralph Marvell- Undine's second husband whom she met through mutual friend, Mr. Popple. They have a son together, Paul, but Ralph can't support Undine's spending needs so she divorces him

11: Undine tries to take Paul while she is in Paris, so Ralf tries to raise money from his family to then put into the stock market for a quick profit to try to buy Paul from Undine. When he can't raise the funds he commits suicide. | X | Undine tries to take Paul while she is in Paris, so Ralf tries to raise money from his family to then put into the stock market for a quick profit to try to buy Paul from Undine. When he can't raise the funds he commits suicide. | Undine tries to take Paul while she is in Paris, so Ralf tries to raise money from his family to then put into the stock market for a quick profit to try to buy Paul from Undine. When he can't raise the funds he commits suicide.

12: 3. Raymond de Chelles- The attractive French Marquise whom Undine meets in Paris , while married to Ralph , because she is "ill". She has a difficult time marrying Raymond because he is Catholic. | 3. Raymond de Chelles- The attractive French Marquise whom Undine meets in Paris , while married to Ralph , because she is "ill". She has a difficult time marrying Raymond because he is Catholic.

13: When she does marry him, after a while she becomes very depressed because he keeps her at his Saint Desert estate and away from Paris. Also he can't support her spending because all his money is tied to his estate. | When she does marry him, after a while she becomes very depressed because he keeps her at his Saint Desert estate and away from Paris. Also he can't support her spending because all his money is tied to his estate.

14: Plot Summary | Undine Spragg is a spoiled young woman who moves from the small town of Apex to New York city with her parents. Her father wanted her to stay away from Elmer Moffat the man she eloped with, but then divorced.

15: She loves the upper society and is accepted for her beauty. She met Ralf Marvell at the theater and was drawn to the fact that he was from the wealthy Dagonet family. They marry and Undine gets her first taste of Europe, where she loves to be around other American people of status.

16: Undine gets very depressed after the birth of their son, Paul, and she takes a sabbatical to Paris. While in Paris she has an affair with her husband's, cousin's, husband, Peter Van Degen.

17: Undine decides to divorce Ralf and goes to North Dakota, a new state where divorce is legal, for Peter Van Degen. Peter Van Degen decides to stay with his wife.

18: While in Paris on her sabbatical, Undine met Marquise Raymond de Chelles. Once she finagles her annulment from her past husband, Undine marries Raymond. It seems perfect, but Raymond limits Undine's spending because their money is tied to the various de Chelles estates.

19: When Undine's first husband, now a successful stock broker and art collector, comes to France to buy a painting from Undine's home, they fall in love, and marry again. The story ends with Undine's realization that her divorces have kept her from the aspiration of ambassador's wife.

20: Literary Analysis | Extended Metaphor: The extended metaphor used to describe Undine as a "Warrior Queen" is used throughout the book.

21: Just as a "Warrior Queen" successfully gets what she desires through conquering so does Undine through marriage.

22: Situational Irony: The ironic twist that the reader finds at the end of the book pertains to Elmer Moffit. Undine marries Moffit when she is very young, and Moffit is not successful, so the marriage is annulled soon after.

23: The irony is that Undine ends up remarrying him because he becomes a billionaire due to the stock market! | $$$$$$$$$$$

24: Themes, Motifs, & Symbols | The central theme in this book is that Undine always gets what she wants when she wants it, and when she gets it she doesn't want it any more. | x | $$$$$$$ | Ralf Marvell

25: Undine is symbolized as a "Warrior Queen" throughout the book because she conquers (marries), takes all that she can, and moves on. | $$$$$$$ | Raymond de Chelles

26: Theme | The end of the book sums up what the reader has probably already figured out . . .

27: Undine will never be satisfied by what she has and she will keep wanting more and more!

28: American Dream . . . Many Americans see America as a "New Eden" with unlimited resources and new opportunities. They believe that life will keep getting better and better. . . | American Dream . . . Many Americans see America as a "New Eden" with unlimited resources and new opportunities. They believe that life will keep getting better and better. . .

29: Undine is no exception. Every time she gets divorced, she does so because she thinks that there is something better out there for her. She just keeps wanting more and more out of her life and that the only person who can get that something is herself. | Undine is no exception. Every time she gets divorced, she does so because she thinks that there is something better out there for her. She just keeps wanting more and more out of her life and that the only person who can get that something is herself.

30: Vocablulary | compatriot | a native or inhabitant of one's own country; fellow countryman or countrywoman. Used to describe Undine's friends from New York.

31: strange or odd from a conventional viewpoint; unusually different Undine uses this word often especially when she doesn't get her way. | queer

32: Vocabulary (continued) | a nobleman ranking next below a duke and above an earl or count. Undine's 3rd husband is Raymond de Chelles who is a French Marquis. | Marquise

33: an artifice or expedient used to evade a rule, escape a consequence, hide something, etc. Undine married Raymond de Chelles by subterfuging her previous marriage. | subterfuge

34: Bibliography | "Edith Wharton (1862-1937)." SIRS Renaissance. 17 Jun 2003: n.p. SIRS Renaissance. Web. 30 May 2011. Holt, Rinehart, & Winston. Elements of Literature. Austin: A Harcourt Education company, 2007. Print. Litz, A. Walton. "The Custom of the Country." American Writers Retrospective Supplement I. New York: Charles Scribner's Son, 1997. 375-376. Print.

35: Paddock, Lisa . "Realism." Encyclopedia of American Literature The age of Romanticism and Realism 1815-1914. New York: Facts on file, Inc., 2002. 164. Print. Rollyson, Carol. "Edith Wharton." Encyclopedia of American Literature The Modern and Postmodern Period from 1915 volume III. New York: Factos on File, Inc., 2002. 273-274. Print.

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