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Vol.2

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S: JKHC Songbook Volume 2: Eagle Clan Songs

FC: Jilkaat Kwaan Heritage Dancers Songbook Volume 2: Eagle Clan Songs | Compiled by Lani Hotch for the Klukwan Community and School Library with support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services

3: Jilkaat Kwaan Heritage Dancers Songbook Volume 2: Eagle Clan Songs Compiled by Lani Hotch for the Klukwan Community and School Library with support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services

4: This project is made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services. All songs in this volume are the property of the clans and should not be used without proper permission. 2011

5: Table of Contents Volume 2: Eagle Clan Songs | Anchors Aweigh- Yanwaa Shaa Sont......8 Ayax Asgi- Shangukedi Love Song.....9 Brown Bear Clan Song.....10 Dei Yin Da Taan/ Taaw Yaat Song.....11 Goosu Wa.ei Kaagwaantaan Yat'xi.....12 Kaagwaantaan Mourning Song.....13 Killerwhale Dive Song.....14 Shaawat Gidaan.....15 Tsu Waa Saa.....16

7: Eagle Clan Songs

8: Anchors Aweigh/Tlingit Translation | Song Text: Sha---- Yei naa kei---- y sa yeik, Bring up your anchors now Yanwaa Shaa Dei----Yanwaashaa, Yee----- yaa dei yoow to tsee geet, We are saying goodbye to you. Kei xeix daak ha goox tla sei-eis We shall sail at dawn. Ya hoochi--- taat ee yax, Since this is the last night together, lets us have a little drink. Naaw nax too noot Tlei wooch wootooos te ni tsa Until we see each other again, Kooxdi neil dei haa yaa kux gwa.oo when we sail back home. English Interpretation: In italics above. Song History/Use: This song was translated by Jack and Ruthe Lokke in May of 1986 for Jennie Thlunaut who was the “Commodore” or leader of the Yanwaashaa, Chilkat Eagle women. The Yanwashaa took the Navy crest after an incident involving sailors who caused the death of some Tlingit people in Klukwan. The sailors were pursued in war canoes by the Kaagwaantaan to Ground Hog Bay—Kax’ Noowu near Hoonah. The sailors were captured and their uniforms and hats were taken according to Tlingit protocol. Rosita Worl wrote that the sailors are “remembered as being Dutch” but the Dauenhaurs in their book Tlingit Life Stories wrote that it was a dispute between the US Navy and the Chilkat Kaagwaantaans. Neither Worl nor the Dauenhauers indicate why only the Kaagwaantaan women—the Yanwaashaa--- claim the navy crest and not the men. George Vancouver, who explored Southeast Alaska in 1793 and 1794 may have shed some light on this issue when he wrote: When Lt. Whidbey and his men visited the Chikats at the head of Lynn Canal they were met with some hostility. The whole of this party which had been collected at a very short notice, seemed to be fighting men, or persons of the description there being neither striplings nor women amongst them, excepting five principal ladies, each of whom. . . steered and conducted one of the five large canoes, the station allotted to them in all warlike enterprises. . . . Other written accounts seem to indicate that Tlingit women, as a matter of course, took a principal part in trade and war. Another oral account indicates that two old Tlingit women led the assault on the first Russian settlement at Old Sitka when they set fire to the Russian’s barracks kitchen.

9: Aayax Asgi-Shangookeidi Love Song | Vocables: Yei hoo ayaanaa--- hei ee yaaw aa naa, Yei hoo ayaanaa--- hei ee yaaw aa naa, Yei hoo ayaanaa--- hei ee yaaw aa naa, Yei hoo ayaanaa--- hei ee yaaw aa naa, Yei hoo ayaaw, hoo ayaaw hanee aaya 1st Verse: Aayax asgee---, shkaa dal neek nooch, (It’'s true what they say) Ya Lingit aanee----, Yaa na gwadl’ee (that the world is turning around) Kaa teeyee xat, xaan kei yaaw ligaas’ (even me, the world has moved with me) Yei hoo ayaanaa--- hei ee yaaw aa naa, Yei hoo ayaaw, hoo ayaaw hanee aaya 2nd Verse: Yoo aan ka.a yax xaan eeyatee, (You are like an earthquake with me) Sha--n goo—kei-- di yat’ki, (child of the Shangookeidi) Ya Haines, Alaska xaan keiseeneit (You shake up Haines Alaska with me) Yei hoo ayaanaa--- hei ee yaaw aa naa, Yei hoo ayaaw, hoo ayaaw hanee aaya 3rd Verse: Chal daa—kat aa—k, sshh yeet ( I used to be shy about everything) Wux daa wook nooch, Sha—n goo— (child of the Shangookeidi) Kei---dee yat’xi (You are the one that broke/cured me of that). Chaa cha wa.eich tsas, xaan kaay li waal Yei hoo ayaanaa--- hei ee yaaw aa naa, Yei hoo ayaaw, hoo ayaaw hanee aaya English Interpretation: In italics above Song History/Use: This song was taught to me by Agnes Bellinger, a Kaagwaantaan elder. She said the song was composed by Tom Jimmie’s younger brother Kulnaalxa (English name unknown) for a woman named Nellie Willard. Kulnaaxa was a very shy and quiet man when he fell in love with this lady. This is a Shangookeidi (Thunderbird) Clan song and can only be used by permission of the Shangookeidi people. It is appropriate for use in a koo.eex or public performance, with permission, when the meaning of the song fits the occasion. It is always appropriate to acknowledge the clan owners when using their songs.

10: Brown Bear Song | 'Song Leader only: ^Yaa aanei-------, Yaa aanei, aanei— All join in: Yaa aanei`aanei, `aanei, hei^ei yaa aanei----, Yaa aanei---- Hei ei yaa aanei, aanei, aanei Repeat as desired with song leader only at beginning of each round. English Interpretation: Yaa aanei. (Here’'s the land.) Song History/Use: This song comes from the Brown Bear House in Klukwan and can only be used with their permission. The song is performed with three main dancers: the brown bear, an eagle and a raven. A carved or stuffed salmon is also used as a prop. The remaining dancers are turned away from the audience and are spaced apart to allow for the bear to move among them. The dancer dressed in a brown bear skin and mask moves like a bear, bent over at the waist, lumbering among the “trees.” After moving among the trees for awhile the bear comes out onto the river bank and he sees a fish. Just then the eagle and raven move in and all three compete for the salmon. The bear chases after the eagle and raven but they persist. The eagle and raven dancers, or someone from the dance group should be making the sounds that eagles and ravens make during this part of the performance. Finally the bear will pick up and carry the salmon back into the woods with him and the eagle and raven give up. The song ends at that point. This song/dance is entertaining and I always like to tell a personal bear story when this dance is performed. It adds interest for the audience.

11: Dei Yindataan Taaw Yaat Song | Vocables: Yei Hoo ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa Yei Hoo ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa Yei Hoo ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa /Yei Hoo/ ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa (/ =hard beat on drum) /Yei Hoo ayaaw, hoo ayaaw, hani aaya 1st Verse: Dei yindataa---n xaan wugixeenaa (Things have turned upside down. . . Yaa ax lee---kw has aanee, . . .spilled over). Daagu yeilch sa kugax sanéix (What Raven could come help us, save us?) /Yei hoo/ ayaanaa hei iyaaw aanaa /Yei hoo aayaaw, hoo ayaaw hanee aaya 2nd Verse: Yee at kahee--- ni—tin xaan (With your belief, faith, Chaa ax eet ch’aa gayee deeshee you help strengthen me inside, Kaa-agwaa—ntaani yat’xi.ee children of the Kaagwaantaan.) /Yei hoo/ ayaanaa hei iyaaw aanaa /Yei hoo aayaaw, hoo ayaaw hanee aaya English Interpretation: In italics above Song History/Use: This Kaagwaantaan Clan song was composed by Charlie Moses, T’aawyaat, (Helen Thomas’' grandfather). Charlie Moses joined the Salvation Army and moved to Sitka to follow his faith. Some years afterward a man from Chilkat came to Sitka only to find Charlie Moses beating a Salvation Army drum on the street corner. “What are you doing here?” the Chilkat man challenged him, “You should be building your grandfather’'s Wolf House.” (The Wolf House was in Ground Hog Bay and it was being rebuilt. This house was later moved to Hoonah.) T’aawyaat wrote this song because he was torn between two cultures---he loved his newly found Christian faith but he also loved his Tlingit heritage too.

12: Goosu Wa.e Kaagwaantaan Yat’xi | Vocables: Yei Hoo ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa Yei Hoo ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa Yei Hoo ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa /Yei Hoo/ ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa (/ =hard beat on drum) /Yei Hoo aya, hoo ayaaw, hani aayaa 1st verse: Goosu wa.e, aa Hei eeyaaw aa naa (Where are you. . .) Kaagwaantaan Yat’xi, ku.aa xaawei (. . .children of the Kaagwaantaan?) Ax káak has eeteex I yaa xaawei (I hold you dear, I value you as much as /Keit toox/ da taancha, hei iyaaw aa naa my maternal uncle). /Yei hoo aya, hoo ayaaw hanee aaya (can repeat 1st verse before going on to vocables and 2nd verse if time and strength allow). Repeat vocables: 2nd verse: Haandei ee jin, aa hei eeyaaw aa naa, (give me your hand. . .) Kaagwaantaan Yat’xi, ku.aa xaawei (. . . children of the Kaagwaantaan,). Hoocheen nis Kaa kalaa shaat aa (so I can hold it, for the last time.) /Yei Hoo/ ayaanaa hei ee yaaw aanaa (/ =hard beat on drum) /Yei Hoo aya, hoo ayaaw, hani aayaa (Can repeat 2nd verse if time and strength allow). English Interpretation: In italics above. Song History/Use: This song belongs to the Kaagwaantaan clan. It was taught to me by Agnes Bellinger, a Kaagwaantaan elder from the Wolf House. I do not know the name of the composer. This song is considered a love song and should be performed as a response, or in conjunction with a Raven clan song to keep a cultural balance. It is especially good for performing at a koo.eex (memorial feast) or for some educational performance as it is a good representation of an Eagle clan song.

13: Hei Naa Ts’oots’ee Yaa | Song Text: Hei naa ts’oots’ee yaa---- Hei naa ts’oots’ee yaa Hei naa ts’oots’ee Hei naa ts’oots’ee Hei naa ts’oots’ee yaa---aa Repeat from the beginning as many times as desired (usually about 6 rounds) English Interpretation: unknown Song History/Use: This Shangukeidi favorite was evidently learned from the interior (Gunanaa) people. It is often used in the Thunderbird dance group performances at the “Celebrations” in Juneau. The song is lively and fun and would be appropriate to use during a koo.eex or other public performance when you want to bring more excitement to a gathering. I am not sure that it is considered part of the Shangookeidi’s at.oow but to be on the safe side it would be better to get their permission to use it in a public performance.

14: Kaagwaantaan Mourning Song | Vocables: Aa—haa—haa—hu, hu, wei-- yaa ^Aahaa—haa aa haa hu, hu, wei—ya Ee—hee-hee yaa-- hu hu wei ya, Aa Haa----, haa aa haa, aa haa haa hei----- Hei hu wei yaa, Ee----hee hee yaa hu wei, yaa hu wei----, hoo waa aa---- Verse 1: Tsu daat yeesis saa---gei, ch’a yei--- kuwaa---noo—oo-ook xaa, ch’a yoo-oo—oon xaa-a jeech. a, ax _(kaak, tlaa, tlaakw, or other maternal relative) ei-ei-ei, aa haa aa ei----,Hei hu wei yaa, Dei---- ax nak yaa- gaa goot aa hu wei---- hoo waa aa--- Repeat 1st verse and then vocables before moving on to 2nd verse Verse 2: Yei ax jeek see—ee yei---ka, Ax kaa---k doo---oo naa—aa.a nei—yee, A------saa-----goo—oo shei---, cha-aa ku---gax sa nei---xei Ei hei hoo wei yaa, Oo--x oo—oo nax li---xaach aa hu wei, hoo waa aa English Interpretation: Verse 1: I don’t know why, I thought he was just teasing me, (He died and the man didn’t believe it,) He’s walking away from me. Verse 2: His arms are going out of sight, as in a drowning man, I feel like I am drowning. I wonder who could save me. I’ve given up. I believe he is dead now. Song Use/History: This song was composed for Kei atxucha/Keitutchk’, a Kaagwaantaan from the Wolf House. The song can only be used by the Kaagwaantaans from the Wolf House during memorial ceremonies. It would not be appropriate to use this song for any other public performance. No exceptions, as this song highly protected clan at.oow and it deals with very heavy emotions.

15: Killer Whale Dive Song Wei--- Ya Haa---Ya Haa Haa | Drummer: starts alone with 8 hard double beats of the drum (heartbeat rhythm) 1st Verse: Wei----ya haa----, ya haa---- haa----- A wei-----------------------------------------(long pause w/o drum and Killerwhale dancers “dive”) Ya haa ---ya haa----- haa, A wei---- ya haa----, wei---- ya haa 2nd Verse: Men: Aa---- Hei, Ladies echo but faster: aa hei, Aa-----Hei, aa hei, Aa-----Hei, aa hei. Return to 1st verse and repeat sequence as often as desired: Ending: aa hei, aa hei, aa hei, aa hei English Interpretation: Vocables only Song History/Use: This song comes from the Daklaweidi (Killerwhale) Clan. The caretaker (Hít Saatí) John Katzeek, of the Kéet Gooshi Hít (Killerwhale Fin House) in Klukwan gave the Jilkaat Kwaan Heritage Dancers permission to use this song as the Daklaweidi Clan are part of the Chilkat people (Jilkaat Kwaan). The song was taught to me by Tim Ackerman and Albert Morgan (Albert Morgan is also a member of the Daklaweidi Clan) in the Spring of 2010. When we were performing this song at the Marine Park during Celebration 2010 I got the inspiration to perform the dance in a moving circle that tightens in at the end, like a pod of killerwhales who herd fish into a tight circle then move in for the kill. We have performed the song that way ever since.

16: Shaawat Gidaan Kaagwaantaan children’s song | Verse 1: Shaawat gidaan, ee seek gidaan, Lady, stand up with your daughter/doll and dance(implied) Ee see-ee-ee-ee-eek, your daughter ee see-ee-ee-ee-eek. your daughter Sing 1st verse three times before moving on to the second verse Verse 2: Shaawat ka teelki, Lady and cute little moccasins/shoes. Goosu wei teelki? Where are your little moccasins? Ee see-ee-ee-ee-eek, your daughter/doll ee see-ee-ee-ee-eek. your daughter/doll English Interpretation: as written in italics above Song History/Use: This is a song that was sung to my sister and I by my great grandmother and grandmother when we were very small. My mother said I used to dance enthusiastically for my great grandmother and it brought her a lot of joy. I think the song must have been passed down through the Kaagwaantaan women because I have heard other Kaagwaantaan women singing it to their grandbabies. When we performed this dance for the public it should be danced by little pre-school or primary age girls. They should start off sitting on the floor playing with their dolls. The grandmother sings to them and they get up and begin dancing with their dolls. They sit down again on the third verse and when the grandmother begins singing they look for their moccasins and put them on to dance again.

17: Tsu Waa Saa-Kaagwaantaan Love Song Composed by Daaxkoodein (or Daakwtank’) for his wife (to be) Gaakaltin | Vocables: Yeiw hoo hei----Yaa hoo waa ei yaa Yeiw hoo hei----Yaa hoo waa ei yaa Yeiw hoo hei----Yaa hoo waa ei yaa ^ Yeiw hoo hei----Yaa hoo waa ei yaa Yeiw hoo hei----Yaaw hanee aa-- ya 1st Verse: Tsu waa saa---- naa.a kas gee deet (What else Xat see hei nooch Neisadee yatxi do you want me to do, child of the Neisadee people?) Dei ee yax xa--- Ya xas gaax ja (I am crying/pleading for your love.) Cha chush kax.aa ---Yaa hoo waa ei ya Yei hoo hei---- Yaaw hanee aa--- ya Repeat 1st Verse and then vocables before going on to second verse. 2nd Verse: Ax Kaak has aa—ee—tee.eex’ (I am honoring/loving you just like my uncles.) Ee yax xaa wei--- kei tux da taanch.aa(s) (You don’t acknowledge my plea) Kaagwaantaan ee.ee yat’xi.ee (child of the Kaagwaantaan) Tleil kwaan dei , chas ee ya kaay yee (Don’t let my words disappear) Tleil kwaa ax jeek Yei haaw ei-----, Yaaw, hanee aa ya Repeat second verse before ending the song Ending: (Hooch a) Yei hoo hei----, Yaa ho waa EE. English Interpretation: in italics above Song History/Use I first heard this song from a recording done by Dan Katzeek, caretaker of the Killerwhale Fin House in Klukwan in the 1950-1960’s. My Uncle Albert Paddy, who was renown for his sharp memory, helped me with the English interpretation and song history in the late 1990’s. Albert said the love song was composed by a Kaagwaantaan man from Klukwan named Daaxkoodein. He composed it while he was cutting firewood. He was thinking about Gaakaltin (Mary) his wife-to-be. The first verse is about his proposal of marriage that Gaakaltin had not yet acknowledged. It expresses his worry: “What else do you want me to do?” The second verse he is reminiscing about his uncles: children of the Kaagwaantaan who are Gaanaxteidi. This is an indirect reference to Gaakaltin. “They don'’t acknowledge my plea. It is like my words have dissipated into the air.” Agnes Bellinger disagreed with the notion that the song was composed by Daaxkoodein and said that it was composed by Daakwtank’ and I note that here as I had no way of verifying that it was composed by either. There is no dispute, however, that this is a Kaagwaantaan love song and that it was composed for Gaakaltin, a Gaanaxteidi woman whose father was Kaagwaantaan. This song can be used by Kaagwaantaans in a koo.eex setting or other public performance where it is deemed appropriate given the meaning of the words. If used by any other clans or dance group permission must be granted by Kaagwaantaans.

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