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HELP Summer 2010

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S: HELP International Summer 2010

BC: "How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world." -Anne Frank | HELP International empowers people to fight global poverty through life-changing, sustainable development programs.

FC: HELP International Summer 2010 | Summer 2010

1: Thank you This summer, HELP was able to make a difference in the lives of thousands of people in Belize, El Salvador, Fiji, India, Thailand, and Uganda. Our volunteers have had their eyes opened and their hearts touched. They have learned substantive ways to provide meaningful service for the rest of their lives. Your support has made all of this possible. Thank you for your generous grant. We have prepared this book for you so that you might have a glimpse into the lives that have been touched and share in the magnitude of positive growth for both our volunteers and those we serve in-country.

4: HELP International empowers people to fight global poverty through life-changing, sustainable development programs.

5: This summer HELP sent volunteers to partner with communities in... Belize El Salvador Fiji India Thailand Uganda

6: Belize | B E L I Z E | Health Projects Worldwide HELP 2010: 5167 people taught Nutrition, Hygiene, and general Community Health lessons 465 school children Drug Education taught in community affecting 5,000 citizens involved with HELP initiated Crime Reduction Campaign 4 schools taught Safety and Natural Disaster guidelines 60 Youth AIDS Community Leaders given taught basic marketing, English, . and Art therapy 10 Pediatric Ward Children . taught English

7: "A group of volunteers started on Monday and went into it with an open mind. The classes are every day from 9 am -11am and 1pm -2pm with two different age groups attending each session. The camp is running for two weeks and each day they teach a new subject. They are focusing on Math, Music, Reading, Crafts and Sports. We were amazed at how many children showed up, because the advertising for it was merely a piece of paper filled with information on the corner store's wall. The first day was kind of ruff with some confusion on age groups and placing the kids in their level of learning, but as the week went on the children settled and they came to grow to love the volunteers and the subjects we taught. " - Belize Country Directors 2010 8/14/2010 | Soccotz Summer School

8: "HELP International’s leadership seminars received national attention this week! Belize National Television interviewed volunteers, recorded segments of the seminars, and created a five-minute news segment on HELP International’s creation and involvement in the leadership classes. The classes have received very strong attendance through out the week in both San Ignacio and Belmopan (combined attendance has been around 25-30). Volunteers taught classes on how to develop important leadership characteristics, how to sculpt healthy perceptions within a person or organization, and public speaking training. We also had the opportunity to hear from a very special guest speaker by the name of Kaila who was Belize’s entrepreneur of the year award winner in 2009. The speech was both inspirational and motivational to all participants and volunteers involved. Participants of the seminar have been very involved and excited about the skills they are learning. Volunteers have been very pleased with the eagerness of the participants and each meeting has been both very educational and motivating." - Belize Country Directors 2010 7/29/2010 | George Price Leadership Camp

9: San Ignacio, Belize | "My experience as a HELP volunteer has given me a great appreciation for the world and the many people in it. I have definitely broadened my perspective on life." Belize Volunteer | "It broadened my horizons. I now feel like I'm capable of accomplishing so much more in life. It taught me so much about development. It gave me confidence in myself as a leader and a communicator." Belize Volunteer

10: Construction Projects Worldwide HELP 2010 | 3000-5000 people helped through the Construction of: 1 Dialysis Center 1 Mobile Clinic 1 Hospital Waiting Room 2 Primary School Classrooms 1 Cooperative land management Observation Post 1 Mushroom House 82 Color-coded and illiterate friendly Hospital Signs 3 Soilet Sanitation Units

11: CIPI | "CIPI is a place with so many needs, that our volunteers have found many ways to utilize their interests and talents to give the residents at CIPI opportunities for a better future. We've painted murals, taught workshops, had mini olympics/field days, coordinated year-round volunteers, and more! Associated slightly with our weekly workshops, we had a month-long Girl's Empowerment Workshop focusing on preparing girls to become young women and professionals.Included as a portion of this empowerment workshop was a two-sided "Sales" project. Once a month CIPI organizes a sale of any donated clothes that can't be used for the kids there, as well as anything that the girls have made in their sewing workshops throughout the month. The team this year decided to work on this project a little more putting together an organized receipt system for the items being sold, as well as an inventory system. The girls were trained on using these basic business tools to make a more effective and efficient running sales program. This way the girls are learning great skills for the future, are being empowered through a well running program that they can confidently manage, and at the same time CIPI is getting more money through the sales! It was a fun project and something we feel will make a huge difference at the orphanage." - El Salvador Country Directors 2010 8/16/2010

12: "We've began our large-scale intervention for under-nutrition through a coordinated family garden project. The goal is to implement square-foot gardens in the home with trainings on well-balanced meals, incorporating fruits and vegetables, and cooking methods in cases where this hasn't been a usual thing. Most families we visited average one meal a week that has any vegetables, and one meal a month including meat (almost always chicken). A regular day will usually consist of beans and tortillas for all three meals, with rice at lunchtime. The current status of the project is looking very promising. We've surveyed a large percentage of the population and now have a running list of the types of fruits and vegetables they commonly grow and eat there, as well as their understanding of a balanced diet, a healthy lifestyle, and clean water. With this information we plan to organize all the foods that they have and customizing a food pyramid to fit their resources, that way they can learn to vary the foods that they eat, and incorporate the fruits and vegetables that have been lacking, by growing them in their own yard. With river rocks, local soil, sand, and dried plant products, community members are being taught to create a small family garden in a way that can produce great quantities of healthy food year-round." - El Salvador Country Director 20106/21/2010 | San Salvador, El Salvador | BALSAMO

13: "It helped to remind me that every little bit helps. Sometimes it was easy to get caught up in thinking that there is so much need and you can only do so little, but when we did a successful project it helped me to see things in a more individualized perspective. When you look at impact on an individual level it is easier to see the difference you are making." El Salvador Volunteer | "I saw people who had nothing, yet wanted to give me everything. My experience has helped me to reflect on my life and see that I truly have so much to give. I realized that I take so much for granted and I need to give more. This experience has helped me gain a greater happiness and peace in life." El Salvador Volunteer

14: Special Needs Projects Worldwide HELP 2010: 17 Wall Murals Painted in Orphanages depicting empowering themes 27 Special Needs Teachers given training on how to better work with disabled children 42 Disabled Children engaged in therapy and learning-activities including outreach program for parents

15: FIJI | Adobe Stoves | "Stoves are really exciting to do because they whole village or community will generally get involved while you are making it. The experiences are never the same and they are always great. They love to help you out and make things better while we are teaching them at the same time. The last stove I did in Lautoka took us and hour and a half because we had so many people helping us build it. It was fantastic to see the community come together and build something that will improve their health and save them money. They were so grateful for the stove we built." Country Director Fiji 2010 7/8/2010

16: Through HELP International's Communication Class in Fiji, 89 people were reached. Some people were in groups of 2 or 3 women, whereas others came for the day to get assistance from HELP. "During that day I taught positive communication/anger management classes to around 35 people. Irene from Gold Foundation (in Tavua) was fabulous in emailing and sending letters to women of different villages. I taught 2 day classes twice with her assistance and reached over 30+ people that way. I believe these communications classes should be implemented into all the areas HELP provides services for. The people were hungry for this type of knowledge...which is usable on a daily basis. " Janis Rowverry, Fiji volunteer Summer 2010 9/10/2010 | Communication Class | Fighting Poverty. Empowering People.

17: "I understand my strengths and even more so my weaknesses. I look at things differently. I understand my blessings better. It has made me stronger and I understand my capabilities. I really love service." Fiji Volunteer | "How I view the world has been completely changed. I never knew how much a single dollar could accomplish." Fiji Volunteer

18: Health Projects Worldwide HELP 2010: 23 Vision and dental outreach campaigns serving both rural and urban populations 7532 Visual acuity screenings and eye related exams performed 159 Cataract Surgeries performed 719 pairs of Eyeglasses distributed 300 Hygiene Kits donated to schools 2 Health Improvement Instructional Videos put together for local hospital 5,000+ First-Aid packages assembled for dialysis patients 175 individuals screened for HIV Virus and 172 ARV prescriptions filled 1414 people were sensitized through Public Health Outreach to dangers of AIDS 257 adolescent girls, boys, and their parents Sex-Education and basic health hygiene 500 “beggar bars” or health bars donated with hotline number for help 1000’s of hours given in Hospital Care 100’s of young children and students given education and attention in response to the victims of and in the fight against Human and Sex Trafficking Over 1000 people screened, 136 Dental cleanings performed and 370 teeth pulled for high-risk school children | SKS Village Profiles

19: India | The HELP India 2010 volunteer group conducted surveys to help SKS with analyzing their members, and gathering information to better assist the people in need in India. Surveys included information about drug usage, school attendance, knowledge of causes of diseases, dietary intake, importance of equality, and many more questions to better understand the group of people SKS works with. The volunteers' research was complied, graphed, and presented to SKS personel to better focus their attention with their members. Some interesting information was recorded about the participants: - 88% of participants bathe daily - 60% that knew about malaria were aware that it came from miskitoes - 48% didn't know how to prevent diseases in general - 52% use borewells to obtain drinking water - 100% brush their teeth daily, but only 60% use a toothbrush | SKS Village Profiles

20: Since its inception in 1994, Rescue Foundation has rescued over 1,300 trafficked girls from brothels in Mumbai, India. Most of these girls had been tricked, coerced, or forced into prostitution in order to pay back a debt that they theoretically incurred onto their “owner.” Once they have confirmed a lead that there are trafficked underage girls inside, Rescue Foundation raids the brothel. Rescue Foundation’s executive director Triveni Archura goes on each raid, individually talking to the girls and offering each girl a chance at a new life through rescue, rehabilitation, and reintigration. Cultivating Flowers, Cultivating Freedom emerged from Triveni’s desire to launch a floriculture business at Rescue Foundation's largest rehabilitation compound, where they house over 100 girls. The majority of the girls come from villages where agriculture is the major source of livelihood. Not only will growing and selling champa flowers contribute to the foundation's existing programs, but more importantly, the business offers the rescued girls relevant agribusiness skills, a revenue-generating job, and a growing sense of confidence. This business may prove to be one of the most essential parts of their reintegration. Ultimately, girls at Rescue Foundation will cultivate freedom as they cultivate flowers. The India team consists of 12 college students and recent graduates who have chosen to spend their summer doing development work in India. They wrote the Cultivating Flowers, Cultivating Freedom proposal and are acting as intermediaries in this project. | Since its inception in 1994, Rescue Foundation has rescued over 1,300 trafficked girls from brothels in Mumbai, India. Most of these girls had been tricked, coerced, or forced into prostitution in order to pay back a debt that they theoretically incurred onto their “owner.” Once they have confirmed a lead that there are trafficked underage girls inside, Rescue Foundation raids the brothel. Rescue Foundation’s executive director Triveni Archura goes on each raid, individually talking to the girls and offering each girl a chance at a new life through rescue, rehabilitation, and reintigration. Cultivating Flowers, Cultivating Freedom emerged from Triveni’s desire to launch a floriculture business at Rescue Foundation's largest rehabilitation compound, where they house over 100 girls. The majority of the girls come from villages where agriculture is the major source of livelihood. Not only will growing and selling champa flowers contribute to the foundation's existing programs, but more importantly, the business offers the rescued girls relevant agribusiness skills, a revenue-generating job, and a growing sense of confidence. This business may prove to be one of the most essential parts of their reintegration. Ultimately, girls at Rescue Foundation will cultivate freedom as they cultivate flowers. The India team consists of 12 college students and recent graduates who have chosen to spend their summer doing development work in India. They wrote the Cultivating Flowers, Cultivating Freedom proposal and are acting as intermediaries in this project. | Rescue Foundation | Hyderabad, India

21: "My eyes were opened..... It was wonderful. I feel like I better understand the hardships of others. I feel like I realized more deeply how important it is to serve other people and that you can help others lives to be better." India Volunteer

22: Student Empowerment Projects Worldwide HELP 2010 408 students taught Music, Drama and Art classes promoting self-awareness and confidence building 428 students including many orphan children engaged in Soccer Camps improving social skills and general wellbeing, partly in conjunction with the Andrew Lovell Soccer Academy started through HELP International 40 children taught in the Conflict Resolution camp 2032 enrolled students and many drop-outs helped through curricula writing, teacher training, life skill building, and youth mentorship programs

23: T H A I L A N D | "With their motivation to work and volunteer here in Thailand, we have been able to find new partner organizations working in remote hill tribe villages. A week ago, some of the volunteers visited some of these villages with the AFECT organization. They traveled up to an Akha village, where AFECT is building a medical clinic, medicinal sauna, bathroom, and shower that Akha people and those in surrounding villages will be able to visit when they need medical assistance. This clinic is the project of a local Akha member, Doctor Tum, who lived deep in the forest as a little boy. There were no roads that led to his village, which required him to travel about 12+ hours to seek medical attention. When we met with him and the village elders, Doctor Tum was generous enough to share some of his personal experiences of becoming a doctor and building this clinic. As a young boy, his father was the village medicine man, but at times the local remedies were not enough to alleviate the symptoms that his mother experienced. Last week, we traveled to the Akha village four days out of the week to help get this medical clinic built. Hauling 30 foot bamboo chutes from the jungle, and heavy bags of stones and sand from the river isn't easy work; we gained much appreciation for the kind of work these hill tribe village members do every day. The hard work also helped us get to know the Akha people better and gain their trust, something essential to the success of future projects we want to do there." - Thailand Country Director 2010 7/6/2010 | Traditional Medical Clinic

24: Chiang Rai, Thailand | Blue Economics | "In the past month, Garrett, Nate, Pim, and Matt have taught five economics classes to about 475 rural cattle farmers in the Mae Lao area of Thailand. They taught the importance of basic bookkeeping, target marketing, supply and demand, critical business analysis, and keeping sales records. For the most part, these farmers weren't doing any of those things because they didn't understand how it would benefit their businesses, so these were important ideas for them to learn. The governor of the Mae Lao area came to one of the classes to acknowledge this program for the Thai government, which is running these classes. When the classes were finished, the government split the farmers up into groups according to their community area and the group that best implements all the training given receives 50,000 baht from the government." - Thailand Country Director 2010 7/6/2010

25: "I will never be the same. It changed me for the better." Thailand Volunteer | "I have come to appreciate different cultures and am more grateful for what I have." Thailand Volunteer

26: English and Literacy Projects Worldwide HELP 2010: 345 Students involved in 2 Literacy Campaigns and after school reading clubs 100’s of books donated 5 adults tutored in 21 English classes 512 people taught English and Literacy classes 31 high school and college age students alongside 45 adults taught Leadership Classes

27: U G A N D A - L U G A Z I | "Ok so imagine a swarm of Ugandan men and women lining up to wash their hands, crazy huh? But true, this past week we had a major hand washing event in the local market. We are putting in 5 new hand washing stations and to help get the people excited about and using it we had a free mini hand washing course. Hillary and I taught a short 10 minute lesson about why, when, and how to washing your hands, if they completed the "course" then they received a little certificate saying they are now Hand Washing certified and got a free gift of a hygiene kit. It was really amazing to see all the market vendors excited to use the new hand washing station and to receive their certificates, especially since they love that kind of stuff here. We were able to give out over a 100 hygiene kits!! Hand washing is great. Also this week we are having our big eye clinic. Sight Savers, an NGO (non-governmental organizations) that helps people get diagnosis and treatment for different eye ailments that donated nearly $4000, and the local hospital ophthalmologists are working with us to help people get the eye treatment they need. Yesterday (day 1) we saw over 250 people! I got to help give the eye exam, the one where people have to read the letters, it was so much fun and we were able to help a lot of people. There were some really cute old men and women that were getting their eyes checked. You don't see many really old people around town so it was a treat to help the cute grandmas and grandpas." Uganda-Lugazi Country Directors 2010 8/15/2010

28: HELP International 2010 | Sanyu School Ssanyu Nursery and Primary School is located within the lush rolling hills of Lugazi, Uganda. It functions as a private school that closely follows the national curriculum and is home to 187 African children between the ages of 2-15. The School stands proudly in the community as a constant reminder to all that dreams do come true. “What sets this school apart” says Francis, a local Ugandan, “is the focus of the holistic development of the person. Many schools focus on academic excellence and that is very good, but the focus here is the child. This mentality is not a big or popular industry, but we believe that holistic development instills moral value within the child, gains the trust of the community and deeply roots within the child social principles that will allow them to contribute positively to our community in the future. We earn that trust because of our good reputation of child development and that is why Ssanyu School is different”.

29: "It has humbled me and helped me understand the urgency and the complexity of many of the problems faced in Uganda" Uganda volunteer "I have seen the way that life is outside of my little American bubble and I don't think that I will be able to continue living the same way that I did before I left. I have loved-ones in Uganda now who are living in a war zone and I am safe and sound in California...I can't keep living my life without remembering them and without trying to continue to help them." Uganda Volunteer

30: Uganda- Mukono | Uganda | Adobe Stoves and Square-Foot Garden Projects Worldwide HELP 2010: 58 adobe stoves were constructed with training provided for another 160 158 Square-Foot Gardens built with an additional 293 people trained on square-foot gardening and vermicomposting techniques with the publication of one manual and many how-to posters

31: "As a team we researched the needs of the Mukono Education District and organized this festival with the help of Mr. Lubega at the District Education office. The nature of the festivals is that the primary school allots us 3 hours of their time where we have five centers that interactively teach the children about important life lessons. These are entitled life skills, life planning, environmental awareness, education is important, and health (HIV/AIDS or sanitation). The coolest part about the lessons in these festivals is that we have progressed this summer from teaching them ourselves as a team, then coaching and assisting the two different volunteer’s clubs as they teach them, and finally watching the volunteer’s clubs complete a festival without any of our assistance. There are two different clubs that call themselves the Volunteer’s Club: One at Mukono Town Academy and the other at Mukono High School- both secondary schools in the Mukono District. These clubs were originally started as a way to continue and sustain the festivals that we had put together and has grown into something much bigger. Not only are these students enthusiastic about teaching the curriculum to these primary children, they are eager to expand and serve more people." - Ugands-Mukono Country Directors 2010 8/9/2010 | School Festival

32: Income Generating Chicken Coops | "The chicken coops were a unique opportunity to stretch our team. We received a $3100 grant from BYU's Students for International Development specifically earmarked to do income-generating projects that would benefit orphans. After canvasing the area for several months, we determined several schools that had large orphan attendance rates and set to work. Most of our job involved assessing, monitoring, and distributing funds. We worked through a reimbursement system where the schools would purchase supplies, provide receipts, and we would distribute funds. Each school required a unique approach. One school agreed to purchase more materials in exchange for us rerouting funds to chickens. Another school provided all of the labor and sought out only local breed chickens who were fully grown. An orphanage provided an unused and unfinished building. In all, the best experience was seeing how willing Tom and Margaret's School, a school started to serve orphans, was to compromise and provide as much as possible in order to make the project a reality. We knew that they wanted our help because of how much they put in to the chicken house, and that helps us to know that their chicken house will continue long after we've left." Uganda Country Director 2010 9/15/2010

33: "I have learned so much about service during my 5 weeks in country. There are days or weeks when you can be so exhausted from working all day for others, but you are so happy because you really feel like you are making a difference." Uganda volunteer | Income Generating Chicken Coops | "I hear the word "poverty," and I almost cry, remembering the neighbors who went meals without food. I realize that the world is so much larger than we can sometimes imagine, and that each person in this world has problems and issues they deal with, but those issues and problems are so diverse, depending on where you are. I can't always go back to Uganda, but I CAN make a difference where I am." Uganda Volunteer

34: Wrap-Up of this Summer: This Year has been one of the most exciting and successful year’s in HELP’s history. We expanded into three new countries, increased our volunteers by 50%, and raised significantly more money than ever before to help those people in country that need us most. As our volunteers return home, they tell friends and family about the incredible work in which they were engaged. People pass their stories from one friend to another friend, which gets the word out about HELP International. This word of mouth has always been the process which enables the great and noble work that we are engaged in, to continue. The summer of 2011 is shaping up to be yet another successful and memorable year which we will have plenty to report on come October 2011. Thank you to all of our donors, volunteers, and partners around the world that have made the organization so successful.

35: Other Summer Accomplishments: 558 People taught Leadership, Computer, Career, Business, Professional, Communication, and Finance Skills 29 teachers trained to becoming Self-Sustaining Entrepreneurs with Bee-Keeping Business to generate income for tuition and teacher salaries 4036 people helped through various AIDS advocacy activities including gardening, group discussions, interviewing, and fundraising in conjunction with local government, and non-profit groups. 148 people trained for improved Micro-Finance and Micro-Credit loaning institutional arrangements 1 Children’s Broadcasting program developed for at risk abused children, especially Refugees 1 Recycling Program started implemented 38 Lepers given care and attention helped

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