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BC: Bibliography 1. "Langston Hughes", poets.org, 25 May 2011, 2. "Life Is Fine by Langston Hughes", The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes, 1994, Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 26 May 2011, 3."Democracy by Langston Hughes", January 2003, 26 May 2011 .4. "Lorraine Hansberry Biographical Information", 27 May 2011,

FC: A Raisin In The Sun

1: Born: May 19, 1930 Died: January 12, 1965 She wsa an African American playwright as well as an author of other literary works. | Lorraine Hansberry

2: Lorraine Hansberry attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison, but didn't enjoy it and left in 1950 to pursue her career as a writer in New York City, where she attended The New School.[She worked on the staff of the Black newspaper Freedom and worked with Paul Robeson and W. E. B. DuBois,

3: After a battle with pancreatic cancer she died on January 12, 1965 at 34.] She left behind an unfinished novel and several other plays, including The Drinking Gourd and What Use Are Flowers?, with a range of content, from slavery to a post apocalyptic future.

4: Langston Hughes

5: James Mercer Langston Hughes was born February 1, 1902 and passed away May 22, 1967 and was an American poet, novelist, playwright, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the new literary art form jazz poetry.

6: Langston Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri. Hughes was named after both his father and his grand-uncle, John Mercer Langston who, in 1888, became the first African American to be elected to the United States Congress from Virginia.

7: Langston Hughes has written many literary works including full length plays, children's works, non-fiction books, novels, poetry, and short story collections. Hughes stressed a racial consciousness and cultural nationalism devoid of self-hate that united people of African descent and Africa across the globe and encouraged pride in their diverse black folk culture and black aesthetic.

8: Democracy by: Langston Hughes | Democracy will not come Today, this year Nor ever Through compromise and fear. I have as much right As the other fellow has To stand On my two feet And own the land. | I tire so of hearing people say, Let things take their course. Tomorrow is another day. I do not need my freedom when I'm dead. I cannot live on tomorrow's bread. Freedom Is a strong seed Planted In a great need. I live here, too. I want freedom Just as you.

9: Title: By the title, Democracy, we think that this poem is about freedom in American and how to gain that freedom. Paraphrase: He is under the impression freedom is never going to come to him. His ideas of freedom differ so greatly from those in power that he is discouraged by their leadership. Connotations: Imagery is used in lines 7 & 8 when Hughes speaks of standing on his two feet. This is a literal statement of standing out that symbolizes standing for what he believes in. Attitude: Hughes attitude is one of longing and hopefulness in a situation that seems hopeless. Shifts: The tones shifts at the beginning of the last paragraph when Hughes begins to demand what he wants instead of complain about what he doesn't have. Title: The title may have a very literal meaning saying that the US government is bad and does not bring freedom. Theme: This poem really about those that live in America and promised all their rights but are neglected and how they can be known of and helped.

10: Life Is Fine by: Langston Hughes | I went down to the river, I set down on the bank. I tried to think but couldn't, So I jumped in and sank. I came up once and hollered! I came up twice and cried! If that water hadn't a-been so cold I might've sunk and died. But it was Cold in that water! It was cold!

11: I took the elevator Sixteen floors above the ground. I thought about my baby And thought I would jump down. I stood there and I hollered! I stood there and I cried! If it hadn't a-been so high I might've jumped and died. But it was High up there! It was high So since I'm still here livin', I guess I will live on. I could've died for love-- But for livin' I was born Though you may hear me holler, And you may see me cry-- I'll be dogged, sweet baby, If you gonna see me die. Life is fine! Fine as wine! Life is fine!

12: Title: The title Life Is Fine makes me think about happiness, hopefulness, and joy. I presume this poem will be about being happy no matter what and everything turning out fine. Paraphrase: No matter what happens in life that seems terrible, there is always a reason to keep on living. Connotations: The references to drowning, and being on top of buildings refer to the emotional highs and lows of life. Attitude: Through out the the poem the author expresses his emotions at different times in his life, both the past and the present. In the past he has been hopeless and miserable, but now he is content and hopeful.

13: Shifts: Whenever the authors attitude changes there is a change in the punctuation of the poem. Lines 9, 18, & 27 The first change is one of deep sorrows but the last is a rejuvination to happiness. Title: The title is blunt and obvious holding no special or secret meaning. Life is always going to have ups and downs and will work out eventually. Theme: This selection is really about having the motivation to push forward when you are in cold waters or high places. It conveys the truth that there is no thing big enough to make one end their life and the realization that life will always go one; no matter what.

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  • By: Cameron B.
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  • Title: Tropical Cruise
  • Raisin In The Sun Multimedia Project Mr. Paul Spring 2011 Megan Parker, Cameron Bolin, Julia Timmons, and T'Keyah Smith
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