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Ian's Poetry Booklet

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FC: Ian's Poetry Portfolio

1: Poetry Term Examples................................Pg 2-5 Poetry Analysis..................................6-11 My Poems..........................................12-13

2: Tanka: A Japanese poem of five lines, the first and third composed of five syllables and the rest of seven. | Saying Goodbye Carefully I walk Trying so hard to be brave They all see my fear Dark glasses cover their eyes As mine flow over with tears

3: Carpe Diem: A Latin expression that means "seize the day." Carpe diem poems urge the reader (or the person to whom they are addressed) to live for today and enjoy the pleasures of the moment. | Gater Ye Rosebuds Robert Herrick

4: Idyll, or Idyl Either a short poem depicting a peaceful, idealized country scene, or a long poem that tells a story about heroic deeds or extraordinary events set in the distant past. Idylls of the King, by Alfred Lord Tennyson, is about King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table.

5: The Passionate Shepherd to His Love by Christopher Marlowe Come live with me and be my love, And we will all the pleasures prove That valleys, groves, hills, and fields, Woods or steepy mountain yields. And we will sit upon the rocks, Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks, By shallow rivers to whose falls Melodious birds sing madrigals. And I will make thee beds of roses And a thousand fragrant posies, A cap of flowers, and a kirtle Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle; A gown made of the finest wool Which from our pretty lambs we pull; Fair lined slippers for the cold, With buckles of th purest gold; A belt of straw and ivy buds, With coral clasps and amber studs: And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my love. The shepherds' swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May morning: If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my love. An example of an Idyll and Pastoral Poetry. Example of Poetry Poetry is piece of literature written by a poet in meter or verse expressing various emotions which are expressed by the use of variety of techniques including metaphors, similes and onomatopoeia. The emphasis on the aesthetics of language and the use of techniques such as repetition, meter and rhyme are what are commonly used to distinguish poetry from prose. Poems often make heavy use of imagery and word association to quickly convey emotions. A famous example of poetry, the poem The Passionate Shepherd to His Love by Christopher Marlowe, illustrates a poetry type or literary term. An example of Idyll poetry. Example of Structure of Poetry The structure used in poems varies with different types of poetry and can be seen in the above example of The Passionate Shepherd to His Love by Christopher Marlowe. The structural elements might include the line, couplet, strophe and stanza. Poets combine the use of language and a specific structure to create imaginative and expressive work such as The Passionate Shepherd to His Love by Christopher Marlowe. The structure used in some Poetry types are also used when considering the visual effect of a finished poem. The structure of many types of poetry result in groups of lines on the page which enhance the poem's composition. An example of Idyll poetry. An example of an Idyll and Pastoral Poetry. The Passionate Shepherd to His Love * The words of the famous poem The Passionate Shepherd to His Love by the famous poet Christopher Marlowe * An example of Idyll and Pastoral poetry. * Illustrating an example of a Poetry type or Literary term * Free Educational resource and example of this literary term * An example of Idyll poetry. * Structure, example, type, form and term * Example of poetry * Word Association to convey emotion. Example of Poetry Type and literary term * The Passionate Shepherd to His Love by Christopher Marlowe * An example of Idyll and Pastoral poetry. * Example of Structure of Poetry

6: Birches By Robert Frost When I see birches bend to left and right Across the lines of straighter darker trees, I like to think some boy's been swinging them. But swinging doesn't bend them down to stay. Ice-storms do that. Often you must have seen them Loaded with ice a sunny winter morning After a rain. They click upon themselves As the breeze rises, and turn many-colored As the stir cracks and crazes their enamel. Soon the sun's warmth makes them shed crystal shells Shattering and avalanching on the snow-crust-- Such heaps of broken glass to sweep away You'd think the inner dome of heaven had fallen. They are dragged to the withered bracken by the load, And they seem not to break; though once they are bowed So low for long, they never right themselves: You may see their trunks arching in the woods Years afterwards, trailing their leaves on the ground Like girls on hands and knees that throw their hair Before them over their heads to dry in the sun. But I was going to say when Truth broke in With all her matter-of-fact about the ice-storm (Now am I free to be poetical?) I should prefer to have some boy bend them As he went out and in to fetch the cows-- Some boy too far from town to learn baseball, Whose only play was what he found himself, Summer or winter, and could play alone. One by one he subdued his father's trees By riding them down over and over again Until he took the stiffness out of them, .

7: And not one but hung limp, not one was left For him to conquer. He learned all there was To learn about not launching out too soon And so not carrying the tree away Clear to the ground. He always kept his poise To the top branches, climbing carefully With the same pains you use to fill a cup Up to the brim, and even above the brim. Then he flung outward, feet first, with a swish, Kicking his way down through the air to the ground. So was I once myself a swinger of birches. And so I dream of going back to be. It's when I'm weary of considerations, And life is too much like a pathless wood Where your face burns and tickles with the cobwebs Broken across it, and one eye is weeping From a twig's having lashed across it open. I'd like to get away from earth awhile And then come back to it and begin over. May no fate willfully misunderstand me And half grant what I wish and snatch me away Not to return. Earth's the right place for love: I don't know where it's likely to go better. I'd like to go by climbing a birch tree, And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more, But dipped its top and set me down again. That would be good both going and coming back. One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.

8: T: I think the title Birches is about birch trees and their characteristics. P: Kids that are haveing fun on birch trees. Feeling sad for all of the bent birch trees. Changing and feeling happy about the thought of kids swinging in the birch trees. Swinging on all the birch trees until there are no more. Wishing he could go back to being young again and and feel happy wile swinging on birches. Going back and feeling the love of it. C: Repitition of swinging on lines three and four saying that swinging in the birch trees is a lot of fun so he wants to repeat it so you can understand the love of it. Imagry: The whole poem is showing imagry and just like the last line, it is putting an image in your head of how someone could be worse then be a swinger of birches, the whole poem is showing birches and kids haveing fun in them.

9: C Continued: Metaphor: The poem is comparing the damage of birches between kids swinging on it and ice storms. He is telling you that ice storms do a lot more damge and kids swinging in them, it is sad that they are damaged that way. Onomatopoeia: 21 lines from the bottem the word swish is used. Rhyme: In the last two lines, could and would rhyme saying that ist would be nice to be a swinger of birches and one could do worse then be it. A: He is feeling happy for most of the poem and haveing a good feeling about thinking the fun in swinging in birch trees. And then he gets sad when he thinks abount ice storms and how much they damage those trees. But mostly he feels happy.

10: T | S: Robert shifts his mood from being happy to being sad and then back to happy again. He feels happy when he thinks about the fun kids have when they play in birch trees. Then he feels sad when he thinks about ice storms ruining the trees. T: Now, after I read and thought about the poem, I think the title is about how fun a birch tree can be if you think outside the box. T: The poem is saying that a birch tree is a very fun thing to play on. It can also give you hard feelings when you think how much damage an ice storm can do to it. It is also saying that it is not a bad thing to swing in a birch tree, it is saying that that is part of what ist is made for.

12: Ode to my Socks Ian Meyer O to my socks without you, my shoes would smell like the things no one would ever want to smell Without you, wy feet would be cold and be covered in blisters my feet would also be withnought some abiotic thing to be in touch with O without socks there would be no hapiness when wanting to use them good, old, feet

13: The Love of Baseball Ian Meyer When I see baseball, I get a feeling no ordinary feeling, just a good feeling I get this good feeling when i see kids playing this loveable sport I get this feeling when I hear the sound of bats, the cling, the clang, the pop, or even the ping the sounds of teams cheering coaches screaming balls hitting mitts, even when the umpire yells strike three, that all brings the feeling its just the love, the love in baseball that brings this feeling to me

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