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TKaM

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TKaM - Page Text Content

S: Yoooo To Kill A Mocking Bird

FC: To | Kill | A Mockingbird | A Literary Analysis By Rhiannon Kiker

1: LIVE FOR THE MOMENT YOU'RE IN | EXPLORE | Table of Contents | Pages 2 and 3............................................................................Setting and History Pages 4 and 5......................................................................................Point of View Pages 6 and 7..............................................................................................Conflicts Pages 8 and 9................................................................................Characterization Pages 10 and 11......................................................................Symbols and Themes

2: "Atticus's office in the courthouse contained little more than a hat rack, a spittoon, a checkerboard and an unsullied Code of Alabama" (Lee 5). | Setting | This book is set in Maycomb, Alabama at around 1933 to 1935. | Tiny town | Racism

3: Historical Context: The Scottsboro Trial | In 1931, two white girls from Tennessee hoboed all the way to Chattanooga. They claimed to have been raped by a gang of 9 black men. | No truth has ever been uncovered from this trial.

4: Point of View | This book is written in first person from the view of Scout- a little girl that is growing up in the town. This helps show the town from an innocent, unbiased view. | "Our mother died when I was 2, so I never felt her absence" (Lee 7).

5: Beheading the Camellias | “What are you doing in those overalls? You should be in a dress and camisole, young lady! You’ll grow up waiting on tables if somebody doesn’t change your ways-a Finch waiting on tables at the O.K. Café-hah!” I listened to Mrs. Dubose berate my sister. I heard Atticus’s voice in my head telling me to be a gentleman, so I didn’t interfere. Scout probably didn’t understand what she was saying anyway. I figured she only understood the tone by the way she grabbed my hand tightly. I shook her loose. “Come on Scout,” I whispered to her. “Don’t pay any attention to her, just hold your head high and be a gentleman.” At this point, I was quoting Atticus. I knew what he would want us to do in this situation. I tried to pull her away, but the old lady held us with a final remark: “Yes indeed, what has this world come to when a Finch goes against his raising? I’ll tell you!” She put her hand to her mouth and trailed a line of saliva away as she pulled it down. “Your father’s no better than the niggers and trash he works for!” My face burned from anger and shock. I fought a flinch from the racist comment and allowed myself to be pulled away by Scout. As we walked down the sidewalk, she continued to barrage us with trashy remarks about our family's-apparent-degeneration, an underhanded comment about our family's history with asylums, and how if our mother had been alive, she might have made us keep some of our dignity. All of it overloaded my mind. I knew that kids at school were plain fools, and I had grown accustomed to listening to them run their mouths. But this time, it was an adult that attacked Atticus. I thought the adults had some sort of dignity about them—at least most of them kept their comments in their own households. This time, we were assaulted by someone else’s rage at our father. I had brought my steam engine to play with and Scout was getting her baton from Elmore’s. I had no interest in this, as I was still in deep thought about Mrs. Dubose. My anger was still boiling under my skin. Scout and I walked towards home; Scout was throwing her baton around, nearly hitting Mr. Link at one point. He shouted something of a warning sort at her that I barely heard, and the moment came when we approached Mrs. Dubose’s house. She wasn’t on her porch for once. I lost control. I snatched the dirty baton from Scout’s hand and frantically ran up Mrs. Dubose’s sidewalk, not caring about what Atticus would say or the fact that Mrs. Dubose usually kept a pistol under her shawl. I hacked away at her camellias, and I did not stop until every camellia bush was devoid of flowers. They littered the ground under my feet and the leaves didn’t crunch as I stepped back, snapped the baton in half, and threw it on the ground. Scout was screeching at me to stop, but I turned and grabbed her hair. “Shut up. I don’t care and I’d do it again if I got the chance!” She continued to scream, and I threatened to pull her hair out if she didn’t stop it. She didn’t. I kicked her, and she fell on her face. I grabbed her and yanked her up, already regretting kicking her.

6: One of the conflicts that takes place in this book is between Atticus and the mob. The mob came to kill Tom Robinson in the jail house, and the only reason they didn't kill Atticus and Tom was because Scout, Jem, and Dill showed up and reminded them of their humanity. | Conflict | There are many conflicts that take place in To Kill A Mockingbird, most of which are external.

7: Another conflict is Aunt Alexandria vs. Calpurnia. Aunt Alexandria. Alexandria believed that Cal had too much freedom with the children, being their black maid. Cal was never anything but respectful to Alexandria despite her rudeness. THis effected Scout worst of all, because it confused her when Cal was suddenly not allowed to have much to do with her and Jem. | A third conflict is one between Scout and he Cousin at the beginning of the book. He called Atticus vulgar names and Scout beat him for it. This was a conflict not only between Scout and her cousin, but between Scout and herself. After this, she keeps quiet about what he said about Atticus, even though she was beat for it. This is when she begins to understand the severity of Atticus's decision to defend Tom Robinson.

8: Characterization | Aunt Alexandra is a static character. She doesn't change throughout the book. She stays a stodgy woman who is concerned with what everyone else thinks. | Atticus is also a static character. Though, you get the impression that he's been through a lot and has changed a lot prior to the beginning of the story. He started an upright, stubborn lawyer type and remained that way throughout the book.

9: Jem is also an example of a dynamic character. At the beginning of the book, he's just another kid, being innocent and playing with his sister. Closer to the end, you can see that he is starting to think for himself and ask questions, especially during the court process. | Scout is an example of a dynamic character. Throughout the book, she grows up, changes and begins to understand more. At the beginning of the book, she didn't understand what the other kids were calling her daddy. She just fought them because it SOUNDED insulting. By the end, she realized what they were saying and realized that it wasn't worth fighting over.

10: "KILL ALL THE BLUEJAYS YOU WANT, BUT IT IS A SIN TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD." -HARPER LEE | SYMBOLS | "What does the title To Kill a Mockingbird even mean? Nobody ever killed one in the book!" | A mockingbird represents innocence and individuality. Children are unique, and precious. This innocence prevails throughout the book--mainly because it is told through Scout's point of view,

11: Themes | 1. Never judge someone until you put on their shoes and walk a mile in them. 2. Childlike innocence should be protected at all costs. 3. Good and evil coexist in this world, whether we like it or not.

12: LIFE ISN'T ABOUT BEING YOURSELF, BUT CREATING YOURSELF

13: EXPLORE YOUR WORLD

14: LIFE IS NOT GOING TO LIVE ITSELF

15: DO WHAT YOU LOVE

16: LIVE & LOVE

17: "A JOURNEY OF 1,000 MILES BEGINS WITH A SINGLE STEP" - LAO-TZU

19: HAPPINESS IS NOT A DESTINATION. IT IS A METHOD OF LIFE. | ADVENTURE

20: LIFE CAN BE FUN IF YOU LIVE IT WELL

21: "DO NOT GO WHERE THE PATH MAY LEAD, GO INSTEAD WHERE THERE IS NO PATH AND LEAVE A TRAIL." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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  • By: Rhiannon K.
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