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Kansas-Nebraska Act Timeline

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Kansas-Nebraska Act Timeline - Page Text Content

S: Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854

BC: In 1847, Kansas & Nebraska were certainly not heaven. But by 1861, the Union had won. A new state was born, & a great promise was sworn.

FC: Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854

1: Time Line of the Kansas-Nebraska Act | 1847-1861

2: From 1847... | Stephen Douglas was elected Senator of Illinois.

3: 1848 | The Free Soil Party vowed that there would be no more slave states. This vow was broke when most of the debates and arguments were won by people who were "pro-slavery."

4: Stephen Douglas revised the legislation that later became the Kansas-Nebraska Act. | 1851

5: Kansas & Nebraska became territories.

6: January - Stephen Douglas introduced what was soon to be the Kansas-Nebraska Act. It was printed for the first time. | 1854... | March - The Republican Party was formed.

7: May - President Franklin Pierce signed the bill and it became a law. | September & October - Stephen Douglas and Abraham Lincoln participated in many speeches regarding their disagreement on the Kansas-Nebraska Act.

8: 1856 | & 1857 | A mini civil war in Kansas broke out. It is known as "Bleeding Kansas" | A pro-slavery document was written. People against slavery boycotted the ratification vote because there was nothing in the document giving them the right to vote against slavery.

9: Lincoln & Douglas ran against each other in the 1858 election for senator. Douglas won the election. | Kansas entered the Union as a free state! | 1858 | ...'Til 1861

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  • Title: Kansas-Nebraska Act Timeline
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