Enjoy up to 55% Off! Code: JOLLY Ends: 12/5 Details
Apply
  1. Help

MEAGAN'S BIRTHDAY!! ;D

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

MEAGAN'S BIRTHDAY!! ;D - Page Text Content

FC: Reading Assessment Study Guide By Meagan Hurd

1: Happy Birthday | Context Clues Hints to understand a difficult word. EXAMPLE: Sarah did a very well, exemplary, job decorating for the party! | Summary To identify the main points of a story. EXAMPLE: When someone asked Jenny what they did at the five hour birthday party, she said they watched movies.

2: Figurative Language describes things with exaggerations. | Similes using like or as to explain something. EXAMPLE: Sally did the frosting so well that it looked like glass. | Metaphors A comparison without using like or as. EXAMPLE: The balloons were bubbles in the air. | Analogies Comparing things. EXAMPLE:When we are at the party Jenna is happy, while Eric is rambunctious. | Idiom A saying someone does not literally mean. EXAMPLE: It was a slap in the face when Jenny didn't like the way the cake tasted.

3: Imagery Putting images in your head using words. EXAMPLE: The table cloth was smooth, with red and white checkers about a centimeter wide covering it. | Onomatopoeia Using a word for a sound EXAMPLE: The confetti went POP all over the ground. | Personification Giving living characteristics to a non-living object. EXAMPLE: The sun winked in the sky as i looked up at the balloon dancing away. | Hyperbole Extreme exaggeration. EXAMPLE: Emma's eyes were as wide as plates when she realized she got the present she wanted. | Symbolism Representing things with symbols. EXAMPLE: When I see a present I know that it means there is a party going on. | To Abby From Meg

4: Text Structures The way someone lays out a story. | Sequence The order of events. EXAMPLE: First Amy opened the presents, then she cut the cake and passed it around. | Problem/Solution When a problem in the story happens, the character finds a way to solve it. EXAMPLE: Kara dropped the cake, So Amy made popcorn for the kids. | Compare/Contrast The author shows differences in topics and how they are alike. EXAMPLE: Elizabeth was good at decorating cakes, while Jim was good at eating the cakes. | Text Structures The way someone lays out a story. | Sequence The order of events. EXAMPLE: First Amy opened the presents, then she cut the cake and passed it around. | Problem/Solution When a problem in the story happens, the character finds a way to solve it. EXAMPLE: Kara dropped the cake, So Amy made popcorn for the kids. | Compare/Contrast The author shows differences in topics and how they are alike. EXAMPLE: Elizabeth was good at decorating cakes, while Jim was good at eating the cakes.

5: Cause/Effect When a event in the story leads to another event in the story. EXAMPLE: Ana leaned on the table, so all the drinks went sliding to the other end. | Description The author uses our senses to put us into the story. EXAMPLE: When I looked around the party, kids were laughing, and there was a sweet aroma of sugar in the air.

6: Topic/Main idea What the story is about. | Supporting details These help you identify the main topic using details. EXAMPLE: The balloons and cupcakes help support the fact that this is birthday themed. | Theme What the author wants you to learn. EXAMPLE: Because Abigale did not like her present, her friend didn't talk to her the next day

7: Author's purpose The way an author wants you to react to a written piece. EXAMPLE: If the author were to say that Julia dropped a glass cup and screamed, you would be surprised. | Literary Devices A descriptive that helps explain a situation more throughly. | Foreshadowing Gives the reader a clue on what is about to happen. EXAMPLE: Tim was balancing the cake perfectly so it wouldn't fall. Or will it? | Flashback The author restates something that has already happened to help explain the story. EXAMPLE: Mandy glares at Tom. Earlier, he had tripped her and did not apologize. | Irony The use of words to explain a opposite meaning. EXAMPLE: Allen brought his pet porcupine, and it popped all the balloons. " Great! Just perfect! said Mandy.

8: Persuasive Techniques Tries to encourage the reader to preform a action. | Bandwagon Tells the reader that others are doing it and you should too. EXAMPLE: Everyone at the party got ice cream except Mandy. Exavier said" You should get some ice cream. it's really good and everyone else did. | Statistics Provides the reader with information to prove the action is good. EXAMPLE: 95% of everyone at the party says that lemon frosting is the best on cupcakes.

9: Testimonials A statement of a person who advises you preform an action. EXAMPLE: Jessica Parker said that this was the best place to order a birthday cake. | Glittering Generalities Emotional appealing words to convince a reader to preform an action. EXAMPLE: If your family and you eat enough frosting then you will all be happy for an entire day! | Emotional Appeal Persuades an audience by using emotions. EXAMPLE: The baby lost the cupcake and started crying. So Bell got her a Deluxe Binki and the baby stopped crying.

10: Characters The people or objects that have to live through the story. | Protagonist The "good guy" in the story that helps the characters. EXAMPLE: Tristan told Henry to stop saying that Joeys present looked bad. | Antagonist The "bad guy" in the story that disturbs the characters. EXAMPLE: When Gilly was laughing Mandy tripped him and hel started crying.

11: Setting Where the story takes place. EXAMPLE: The party took place in Mandy's house. | Plot The main idea the author uses in his/her writing. | Problem/Conflict man vs. man, man vs, nature, man vs. self. EXAMPLE: Mandy wanted to tell Bob that his present was rude, but she told herself it would be mean. | Rising Action A series of events that lead up to the main event. EXAMPLE: Mandy walked in, turned on the lights, and was about to think people forgot her birthday, when they all jumped up and yelled, "SUPRISE!!"

12: Subplots A secondary plot as in a novel or play. EXAMPLE: Linda, Abby's mom, had problems setting up for the party. So, Abby was stressed out during school. | Resolution When the problem in the story is corrected. EXAMPLE: Linda finally got the party set up and everyone had fun. | Falling Action Occurs after the climax has been reached and the conflict has been resolved. EXAMPLE: Everyone had a fun time at the party after Mandy finally finished putting up the decorations.

13: Climax The most intense part in the development of the story. EXAMPLE: Mandy rushed to get the dinner plates set down right before the first guest rang the doorbell. | Parallel Episodes Repeated scenes in a plot. EXAMPLE: When Marissa walked in Jackie hugged her and said,"Thanks for coming to the party!" When Abbi walked in Jackie smiled and said, "Thanks for coming to the party!"

14: Fact vs. Opinion What someone thinks compared to what someone has proven. EXAMPLE: Mandy said that the punch was gross and unhealthy, but Bobbie looked at the bottle and it said 100% juice.

15: Bias The author has an opinion and creates favoritism. EXAMPLE: When Mandy yelled at Julia, everyone was mad at her until she said she was having a really bad day because she only got two presents.

Sizes: mini|medium|large|gargantuan
Default User
  • By: mrssmoke
  • Joined: almost 8 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 9
No contributors

About This Mixbook

  • Title: MEAGAN'S BIRTHDAY!! ;D
  • Tags: None
  • Published: almost 7 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order