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Poetry Portfolio

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BC: It will never go away No matter how much you pray That thing with the must irritating noise Many weeks and many months have past That thing has survived, until......... at last That thing that sat alsways by your bed Is no more, finally its batteries are dead Too bad that school is done And that thing you hate most will be back for more fun

FC: Tony's Poetry Portfolio

1: Table of Contents | Poetry Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Birches Poem . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Birches Analysis . . . . . . . . . 7 Ode To Baseball . . . . . . . . . . 10 Another Morning Narrative . . . . . . . . . . 11

2: Conceit A fanciful poetic image or metaphor that likens one thing to something else that is seemingly very different. EX: "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" By William Shakespeare | Haiku A Japanese poem composed of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. Haiku often reflect on some aspect of nature. EX: "The sun shines warmly The dragonfly watches me planting my basil " -Anonymous

3: Couplet In a poem, a pair of lines that are the same length and usually rhyme and form a complete thought EX: Football Game By Chelsey Hanawahine When I go to the the football game people yell like their insane The football Coach is my dad, for this fact I'm very glad.

4: WHEN I see birches bend to left and right Across the line of straighter darker trees, I like to think some boy's been swinging them. But swinging doesn't bend them down to stay. Ice-storms do that. Often you must have seen them 5 Loaded with ice a sunny winter morning After a rain. They click upon themselves As the breeze rises, and turn many-colored As the stir cracks and crazes their enamel. Soon the sun's warmth makes them shed crystal shells 10 Shattering and avalanching on the snow-crust— Such heaps of broken glass to sweep away You'd think the inner dome of heaven had fallen. They are dragged to the withered bracken by the load, And they seem not to break; though once they are bowed 15 So low for long, they never right themselves: You may see their trunks arching in the woods Years afterwards, trailing their leaves on the ground Like girls on hands and knees that throw their hair Before them over their heads to dry in the sun. 20 But I was going to say when Truth broke in With all her matter-of-fact about the ice-storm | Birches by Robert Frost

5: WHEN I see birches bend to left and right Across the line of straighter darker trees, I like to think some boy's been swinging them. But swinging doesn't bend them down to stay. Ice-storms do that. Often you must have seen them 5 Loaded with ice a sunny winter morning After a rain. They click upon themselves As the breeze rises, and turn many-colored As the stir cracks and crazes their enamel. Soon the sun's warmth makes them shed crystal shells 10 Shattering and avalanching on the snow-crust— Such heaps of broken glass to sweep away You'd think the inner dome of heaven had fallen. They are dragged to the withered bracken by the load, And they seem not to break; though once they are bowed 15 So low for long, they never right themselves: You may see their trunks arching in the woods Years afterwards, trailing their leaves on the ground Like girls on hands and knees that throw their hair Before them over their heads to dry in the sun. 20 But I was going to say when Truth broke in With all her matter-of-fact about the ice-storm (Now am I free to be poetical?) I should prefer to have some boy bend them As he went out and in to fetch the cows— 25 Some boy too far from town to learn baseball, Whose only play was what he found himself, Summer or winter, and could play alone. One by one he subdued his father's trees By riding them down over and over again 30 Until he took the stiffness out of them, And not one but hung limp, not one was left For him to conquer. He learned all there was To learn about not launching out too soon And so not carrying the tree away 35 Clear to the ground. He always kept his poise To the top branches, climbing carefully With the same pains you use to fill a cup Up to the brim, and even above the brim. Then he flung outward, feet first, with a swish, 40 Kicking his way down through the air to the ground. So was I once myself a swinger of birches; And so I dream of going back to be. It's when I'm weary of considerations, And life is too much like a pathless wood 45

6: And so I dream of going back to be. It's when I'm weary of considerations, Where your face burns and tickles with the cobwebs Broken across it, and one eye is weeping From a twig's having lashed across it open. I'd like to get away from earth awhile And then come back to it and begin over. 50 May no fate wilfully misunderstand me And half grant what I wish and snatch me away Not to return. Earth's the right place for love: I don't know where it's likely to go better. I'd like to go by climbing a birch tree, 55 And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more, But dipped its top and set me down again. That would be good both going and coming back. One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.

7: Birches Analysis By Tony | T= I think that the title says that the poem is probably going to be about birch trees and how they undergo life P= Robert Frost is saying that ice-storms bend birch trees and how later in the year, the sun's warmth melts the icicles and they fall into the snow. He also says that some times their trunks arch the older they become. A boy who is too far away from town to hang with friends, finds his own fun and decides to play in his father's trees until they are bent. He would climd to the top of the branches then bend the branches until he could touch the ground and then he would let go and would soar through the sky. Later in the poem, he says that life is a pathless wood, where your face touchs cobwebs maybe because no one has gone there before. | C= Robert Frost uses a lot of similes and imagery. "Years afterwards, trailing their leaves on the ground, like girls on hands and knees that throw their hair before them over their heads to dry in the sun" is a simile comparing birch tree leaves to girls' hair. I think he is saying that eventually people, like birch trees, get old and hunch a little. "Soon the sun's warmth makes them shed crystal shells" is a form of imagery because it shows us how the sun melts icicles like how parents might melt the fun out of our lives as kids in order to become serious adults.

8: C (continued)= "And life is too much like a pathless wood" I believe that Mr. Frost is saying that when going into adulthood, it is always the hardest way to go and that it is like a pathless wood because it is not easy to get around all those trees without a path guiding you. You have to accomplish this journey on your own without help. One way he uses symbolism is in line 21 when he uses the word Truth. Truth is symbolising reality and that he should stop dreaming about childhood and fun times he would have. Also, that Truth can come in all of a sudden without youe xpecting it. In this poem, he uses symbolism. "One by one he subdued his father's trees" This is just one of many times when he uses trees for symbolism. I think that the trees represent in some way, childhood characteristics and adulthood characteristics. In the beggining of the poem he talks about boys jumping on the trees and girls drying their hair | out in the sun and both times he compares it to birch trees. Later he says how a bot subdues his father's trees, in other words, he took over his father's ways of adulthood and followed his ways of life. A= Robert Frost is sad because being a child is over and now he has to become an adult which is not fun but more seriuos S= Between lines 41 and 42 because in all of the poem before line 41, he is actually dreaming of what childhood was like and then all of a sudden at line 42, he comes back to reality and starts to talk about adulthood and th path to adulthood. T= The title makes me now think that the meaning of the poem is being hidden by using trees as symbolism and that the poem is still about the way of life and growing up.

9: T= Robert Frost is saying that we should enjoy childhood now because if we do not, than when we grow up and become adults, we eill miss it and than we will be sad because we cannot go back.

10: Ode to Baseball | By Tony | O baseball, you are played in the most extreme of weather From pouring rain to 104 degrees heat You're made with the beat quality of leather With red laces and a hard inner core The way you fly through the air as my aluminum bat comes in contact with you Going right by the center fielder's mit The yell of the other team's coach as I run past third And you still in the outfield As the game ends the coaches asks me to take you home O baseball, you are the best friend

11: Another Morning A Narrative by Tony | The sun's rays blind my eyes As the first site of morning seeps through the skies The birds awake and chirping with joy But their songs do not compare to that thing with the most irritating noise It beeps and it rings, It shakes and it dings, That thing with the most irritating noise No matter how many pillows you may stuff on your head It will always e there, by your ears and near your head You will come up with schemes and plans, though you may look like a fool But you must get rid of that thing which you may hate more than school Continued ----

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  • By: Tony F.
  • Joined: over 7 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 2
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  • Title: Poetry Portfolio
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  • Published: over 7 years ago

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