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BC: Philosophers of Greek By Victor D.

FC: Philosophers of Greece By:Victor D.

1: GREEK PHILOSOPHERS E E K P I L O S O P H E R S | Thales of Miletus | Heraclitus | Epicurus | Parmenides of Elea | Zeno of Citium | Chrysippus

2: Thales of Miletus | Thales of Miletus, also known as Thales, was born in Miletus in Greek Ionia in the mid 620s BCE and died around 546 BCE. Thales is known for being the first person to investigate the basic geometrical principles and as the founder of the school of natural philosophy. He was the type of person who was interested in almost everything around him. Being interested in investigating almost all the areas of knowledge, philosophy, history, science, mathematics, engineering, geography, and politics. In other words, everything that is involved with the world around us and makings a living for us. Thales had came up with theories to explain the importance of many events that took part of nature, the support of the earth, the primary substance, and the causes of change. He was mostly involved in taking part of the problems of astronomy and coming up with conclusions in how to solve the different types of problems. His questioning on topics approached the understanding of phenomena and was the beginning of Greek Astronomy. Tales had a creative mind and came up with new, bold hypotheses and it helped him find his way into scientific Endeavour. He developed the scientific method and began the first western enlightenment.

3: almost all the areas of knowledge, philosophy, history, science, mathematics, engineering, geography, and politics. In other words, everything that is involved with the world around us and makings a living for us. Thales had came up with theories to explain the importance of many events that took part of nature, the support of the earth, the primary substance, and the causes of change. He was mostly involved in taking part of the problems of astronomy and coming up with conclusions in how to solve the different types of problems. His questioning on topics approached the understanding of phenomena and was the beginning of Greek Astronomy. Tales had a creative mind and came up with new, bold hypotheses and it helped him find his way into scientific Endeavour. He developed the scientific method and began the first western enlightenment.

4: Heraclitus Heraclitus, from Ephesus, was born around 535 B.C. and died around 475 B.C. He was a pre-Socratic Greek | philosopher who disagreed with Thales about the nature of the ultimate substance. He believed that everything is is derived from the Greek | Classical element fire, rather than from air, water, or earth. This disagreement led to the belief that change is real. Heraclitus is known for his

5: famous saying: "No man can cross the same river twice, because neither the man nor the river are the same." He believed that everything is in flux, which means that he believed that everything goes through changes. Heraclitus' view on the explanation of change is foundational to any theory of nature was strongly opposed by Parmenides, who argues that change is an illusion and that everything is fundamentally static.

6: Epicurus One of the major philosophers in the Hellenistic period is known to the be Epicurus. The Hellenistic period was the three centuries that followed the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE. Epicurus developed an unsparingly materialistic metaphysics, empiricist epistemology, and hedonistic ethics. He also taught the people around him that the basic constituents of the world are atoms, uncuttable bits of matter, and flying through empty spaces. He also tried to explain that all natural phenomena in atomic terms.

7: He also taught the people around him that the basic constituents of the world are atoms, uncuttable bits of matter, and flying through empty spaces. He also tried to explain that all natural phenomena in atomic terms. Epicurus believed that the gods had no influence on our lives and that we could gain knowledge for the world by relying upon our senses. He taught that the point of everyone's actions was to achieve pleasure for themselves and that it can be done by limiting their desires and casting out their fear of the gods and of death. His way of getting rid of fears proved to be popular and had been practiced in the communities of Epicurean for centuries after his death.

8: Parmenides of Elea Parmenides was an ancient Greek philosopher born in Elea, a Greek city on the southern coast of Italy. He was the founder of the Eleatic school of philosophy. He was descended from a wealthy and illustrious family. Parmenides was the founder of the School of Elea which also included Zeno of Elea and Melissus of Samos. Of his life in Elea, it was said that he had written the laws of the city.

9: illustrious family. Parmenides was the founder of the School of Elea which also included Zeno of Elea and Melissus of Samos. Of his life in Elea, it was said that he had written the laws of the city. Parmenides is one of the most significant pre-Socratic philosophers. His only known work, "On Nature" is a poem which is only in fragmentary form. Approximately 150 lines of the poem remain today. It is said that the original text had 3,000 lines. In the poem the narrator travels "beyond the beaten paths of mortal men" to receive a revelation from an unnamed goddess on the nature of reality. Parmenides felt that either something existed, or it didn't (the Principle of Non-Contradiction). He also believed that creation and destruction were impossible. This view was the cornerstone of the Eleatic school. Parmenides studied the implications of the statement "it is" in The Way of Truth and The Way of Seeming, and believed that anything that changes cannot be real.

10: Zeno of Citium Zeno of Citium was a greek philosopher. Born 334 BC, in Citium in Cyprus. Zeno was the son of a merchant and was a merchant himself. He | came to Athens to learn philosophy at the age of 22. After a shipwreck, Zeno wandered into a bookshop in Athens and was attracted to some writings about Socrates. Zeno asked the librarian how to find a man as like a socrate. The librarian pointed to Crates of Thebes, the most famous Cynic living at that time in Greece. Zeno is described as a haggard tanned person, living a spare ascetic life. This goes with the influences of Cynic teaching. Apart from Crates, Zeno studied under the philosophers of the Megarian school. Zeno began teaching in the colonnade in the Agora of Athens known as the Stoa Poikile in 301 BC. Among the admirers of Zeno was King Antigonus II Gonatas of Macedonia,whenever he came to Athens, would visit Zeno.

11: under the philosophers of the Megarian school. Zeno began teaching in the colonnade in the Agora of Athens known as the Stoa Poikile in 301 BC. Among the admirers of Zeno was King Antigonus II Gonatas of Macedonia,whenever he came to Athens, would visit Zeno. Zeno died around 262 BC. It is said that as he left the school he tripped, fell and broke a toe. Hitting the ground with his hand, he cited words of Niobe: "I am coming, why do you call me thus?" Since the Stoic sage was expected to always do what was appropriate (kathekon) and Zeno was very old at the time, he felt it appropriate to die and consequently strangled himself. While living Zeno received appreciation for his philosophical and pedagogical teachings. Amongst other things, Zeno was honored with the golden crown, and a tomb was built in honor of his moral influence on the youth of his era. The crater Zeno on the Moon is named in his honor.

12: Chrysippus Chrysippus was known for being a philosopher and also a writer. He wrote over seven hundred pieces of writing, but not many are found. He was born in 279 BCE and died sometime in 206 BCE, in a place called Soli. His way of contributing to the development of philosophy can be found in the fields of logic. The fields of logic is where he studied paradoxes and the correct and appropriate for constructing an argument.

13: the correct and appropriate for constructing an argument. Chrysippus' writings were reflected on the use of allegoresis, which is a way to read a text in a metaphorical way and finding the hidden meanings to words and phrases. He was the man who concluded that if the rational principle of the universe (the logos) was devine, then the world could be defined as a manifestation of God.

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