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Design of Elements

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Design of Elements - Page Text Content

S: DESIGN OF ELEMENTS

FC: DESIGN OF ELEMENTS BY LAURA QUINLAN

1: TABLE OF CONTENTS LINE: 1-4 PAGES VALUE: 6-9 PAGES SPACE:10-13 PAGES FORM:14-17 PAGES TEXTURE: 18-21 PAGES COLOUR: 22-25 PAGES SHAPES: 26-29 PAGES

2: LINE

4: What's in a line? The lines are an indefinite part of our world. Encompassed with diverse characteristics and purposes, Like an onion, each essential part of lines reveals itself at a layer at a time. The first thing we will notice is how the artists intuitively mold lines into certain shapes, sizes, movements and directions. The following few examples of physical characteristics of lines are modulated; contour and cross- hatching. Resembling in sizes and shapes, the contour line can be only applied with a singular line. It also has a tendency to go in the same direction. | When applying value and space of their object, the artists do not only assess the accessibility of light but the form of "implied lines". Cross-hatching, a shading technique which of repeated line strokes will evoke a movement of an object. Another traditional characteristic we might notice regarding this element is implied lines. With implied lines, they usually come and go as we look at the object. However, some lines, though difficult to see, will be still present around the object.

6: VALUE

8: Ranging from light to dark, value appears everywhere. For instance, the sunlight will reflect against positioned objects which results leaving shadows behind. This is called cast shadow. In paintings and drawings, we can see how value adds more depth to the objects. Shown in different aspects, value has profound meanings. Decorative value is based less on any type of lighting source and instead, concentrates more on pictorial creations. Meanwhile, the value of a still life object is formally known as plastic value. Shallow space value is limited in areas and thus, is very small in the motion. For an example, the drawing (8.1) clarifies darkness and lightness of its main object, the sphere. As the cast shadow directs the eye right to the sphere, the motion starts to slow down. The foreground, dull and dark, appears lifeless with none of any significance. | Setting an emotional tone is undoubtedly important when it comes to applying value. Decorative value's child-like tone evokes quite an energetic, youthful mood. With this type of value, we usually see a range of bright colours and organic shapes. If applied, the lighting would appear in non-directive places. With shallow value space, certain details of the layout have to be reduced. The most emphasized areas have more details and therefore feel closer. Yet because shallow space is second dimensional in forms, the works appear distant and flat.

10: FORM

12: Form is the “glue” that hold many other elements together, both physically and internally. As a result, the connection between them is inseparable. Fundamentally, the arrangement of objects play an important role of the relationship between elements, especially form. The closer the objects are, the more whole they become in our minds. As this proceeds, the rhythmic beats are evoked through the continuity of an object's movement. Depending on the artist's intentions, the movement can mean many things. For instance, a composition of repetitive colours, sizes, and shapes is be more likely to appear harmonious. In symmetry, the form of objects often maintain a sense of balance and beauty. In asymmetry, the main focus is on offering different possibilities to approach the concept. | Symmetry follows the traditional way for the arrangement of objects, which of space is created equally. Asymmetry, on the other hand, has less of boundaries. Negative space is less passive with asymmetry. It emphasizes the juxtaposition of elements withing the pictorial creation. This can create tension, disorganization and even excitement. Not always physically visible in the real world, the form is usually implied through a still life object's reflection of light. Three dimensional sculptures are of various examples of what we see as form in real life.

14: SPACE

16: The relationship between elements is based on space. With space, we can distinguish the distance between points or images. Space itself does not always have to be actual. In the fact, it can be illusionary. The following few types of space are plastic, shallow, deep and infinite space. Deep and infinite space simulates an everlasting effect in the composition, usually with continuous patterns and objects. The pace of rhythm beats moves narrowly in one direction, which adds more depth to the perspective. This is an excellent example of illusionary space. Secondly, shallow space, though limited, gives an illusion of perception to the mind. The space challenges the reality of perception further. (16.1) | Lastly, plastic space is based on an actual space of still life objects. The distance between objects converts into space, which also applies to negative and positive areas. In space, the highly emphasized areas are known as positive areas. Meanwhile, the less noted areas are known as negative areas.

18: TEXTURE

20: When we think of textures, our five senses come to the mind. Many for us, our memory is triggered by how things felt to us when we touched them. For example, the softness of a cat's fur may remind people of their childhood pets. On the other side, wrinkled tissues may be a reflection of the insufferable flu to some of us. The whole point of texture is to capture that feeling. How the artist exactly plans to accomplish this goal depends on the type of texture present in the work. | The following examples of techniques for texture are real, trompe l'oeli and simulated textures. With real textures, the artists may embed varied objects onto their work. In Pollock's Fathom Five, his personal items such as cigarette butts, nails, and keys were used to enhance his signature drip painting. Unless the viewers look at the painting closely, they will not notice Pollock's placed items. (20.2) Secondly, trompe l'oeli, deprived from the French word, "deceive the eye" plays a great part in creating an imitation of real life objects. Anne's Jacket, made out of clay, Levine was able to imitate the texture of leather which of scratches and wear marks looked quite realistic. (20.1) Lastly, unlike other two previous techniques, simulated texture is second dimensional. On second dimensional works such as paintings, texture is simulated through line strokes, shapes and colours.

22: COLOUR

24: Ranged from primary, secondary and tertiary triads, colours are everywhere. Depending on how the pigment or colour quality absorbs delour waves, each colour is reflected in a different hue. No colour can be labeled as one, thus every colour we see is unique. It does not matter if there happen to be two colours in a similar hue. Meanwhile, black, grey and white are known as neutral due to their original state. Colours play an important role in expressing emotions. For instance, the colour yellow generally means happiness while red may mean passion. Primary colours usually create an energetic and youthful vibe. Secondary colours usually feel cool and naturalistic.

26: SHAPES

28: Almost every object, either illusionary or real, is depicted of three most basic shapes- triangles, circles, and squares. Shapes essentially start out as a form of an object and end as a whole set of elements. Setting a proportion to measure divided parts of an object keeps the composition balanced. For instance, an adult body is usually drawn eight heads high. The shapes also help to convey negative and positive space. Another purpose is to interact with the three dimensional world through the second dimensions. There are times when shapes speak louder than the words. Universally accessed, they bring a revelation to our feelings, experiences and thoughts. When we see geometric shapes, our left brain is simulated with a conceptual illusion. Traditional rules evoke a harmonious unit between objects. | Meanwhile, organic shapes are more literal in the form of expression.

30: CONTRIBUTIONS TO ART FUNDAMENTALS THEORY AND PRACTICE BY OCVIRK, STINSON, WIGG, BONE AND CAYTON GRAPHIC DESIGN SCHOOL: THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF GRAPHIC DESIGN FOURTH EDITION BY DAVID DABNER, SHEENA CALVERT AND ANOKI CASEY MANY AWESOME WEBSITES MY PERSONAL WORK (CLASSES INCLUDING VISUAL IMAGING AND DESIGN)

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  • By: Laura Q.
  • Joined: about 5 years ago
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  • Title: Design of Elements
  • A whole outlook on each unique element that defines the meaning of design. With their physical and emotional characteristics, many revelations will be made to what makes "art"!
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  • Published: almost 5 years ago

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