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Mixbook Poetry Part II

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Mixbook Poetry Part II - Page Text Content

FC: Mixbook Poetry Part II By Sonny Hammoud

1: Table of Contents "It's All I Have To Bring Today" by Emily Dickinson Page 2-3 "This is Just to Say" by William Carlos Williams Page 4-5 "Trees" by Joyce Kilmer Page 6-7 "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson Page 8-9 "We Real Cool" by Gwendolyn Brooks Page 10-11

2: It's All I Have To Bring Today It's all I have to bring today— This, and my heart beside— This, and my heart, and all the fields— And all the meadows wide— Be sure you count—should I forget Some one the sum could tell— This, and my heart, and all the Bees Which in the Clover dwell.

3: By looking at the poem's title, I thought it would be about something be brought and I think the poet chose that title to make a reader get curious on what is brought when the reader reads the poem. The poem goes: it's all I have to bring today, this beside my heart, all the fields, all the meadows wide, make sure to count if I forget, someone with the sum could tell, this with my heart and all the bees which dwell in the clover. The poet's imagery is pretty good to imagine in your mind like all the fields, all the mellows wide, and all the bees that the poet used in the poem. The poet expresses a sort of love feeling toward the reader because in the poem, the poet writes about bringing something beside the speaker's heart and that would give the poem a type of love feel to it. The poem is in only one stanza with eight lines and goes and there are around five to eight words in the lines, that is how the poem shifts. Again, the poem's title is "It's All I Have To Bring Today", and I think the poet chose that title to have a reader feel a bit curious to what is brought in the poem. The poet wrote about bringing something and with the speaker's heart and the poet is probably trying to teach us that bringing something could have love with it.

4: This is Just to Say I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox and which you were probably saving for breakfast Forgive me they were delicious so sweet and so cold

5: The title of this poem is "This is Just to Say", so I think this poem could involve a secret for the reader when reading the poem. The poem goes: I have eaten the plums in the icebox that you probably was saving for breakfast and please forgive me, they were delicious and so sweet and cold. For connotation, this poem is free verse and seems pretty good at being that.The poet seems to write in a calm mood because the words in the poem are said in a calm and happy way. There are three stanzas with four lines in each. There are two to three words in the lines. That is how the poem shifts. The title is "This is Just to Say", I think the reason the poet chose this title because it admits a secret for the poem and it can get readers curious on what it is about. The theme is that you can admit something and it can be alright because the poem is about the speaker admitting to eating the plums and that is what he is trying to teach us.

6: Trees I Think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree. A tree whose hungry mouth is prest Against the sweet earth's flowing breast; A tree that looks at God all day, And lifts her leafy arms to pray; A tree that may in summer wear A nest of robins in her hair; Upon whose bosom snow has lain; Who intimately lives with rain. Poems are made by fools like me, But only God can make a tree.

7: The poem's title is "Trees", and I think it could obviously be about trees. The poem goes: I think I'll never see a poem as lovely as a tree, a tree with a hungry mouth that is prest against sweet earth's flowing breast, a tree that looks at God all day and her leafy arms to pray, a tree that may in the wear of summer with a nest of robins in her hair and upon whose bosom snow has who lives with rain; poems are made by fools like me, but only God can make a tree. The poem has a rhyme pattern of A and B and is like lyric poetry, and the poet used imagery and symbolism pretty good in the poem. The attitude of the poet feels nice and calm because the poet writes the poem with words to really express nature in a good way. The poems has six stanzas with two lines in each and there are five to eight words in the lines so it shifts well. Again, the title is "Trees", and I think the author chose that title to tell that a poem should be like a tree and be beautiful. The theme is that a poem should be as beautiful and great as a tree and that is what I think the poet is trying to teach us.

8: Because I Could Not Stop for Death Because I could not stop for Death-- He kindly stopped for me-- The Carriage held but just Ourselves-- And Immortality. We slowly drove--He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility-- We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess--in the Ring-- We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain-- We passed the Setting Sun-- Or rather--He passed us-- The Dews drew quivering and chill-- For only Gossamer, my Gown-- My Tippet--only Tulle-- We paused before a House that seemed A Swelling of the Ground-- The Roof was scarcely visible-- The Cornice--in the Ground-- Since then--'tis Centuries--and yet Feels shorter than the Day I first surmised the Horses' Heads Were toward Eternity--

9: The title for this poem is "Because I Could Not Stop for Death", and from the name, I think it could involve death in some way. The poem paraphrased is like this: because I couldn't stop for death, he stopped for me, the Carriage held but just ourselves and immortality; we slowly drove and he knew no hassle, I had to put away my labor and leisure for his civility; we passed the school where children strove at recess in the Ring, we passed the Fields of Gazing Grain and the Setting Sun or rather he passed us; the Dews drew quivering and chill for only Gossamer, my gown, tippet, and only Tulle; we paused before a house that seems to have a Swelling of the Ground, the roof was scarcely visible with the cornice in the ground; since then, these centuries and yet feel shorter than the day I first surmised the Horses' Heads were toward eternity. The poem has good imagery and symbolism well and I see no problems with the words the poet used. The poet seems to have a more dark and a kind of scared feeling because the poem has some dark details on things and its talks about death like someone is after the speaker. There are six stanzas with four lines in each stanza and the sentences seem sort of short at times and overall, the shift is good. The title of the poem seems to fit the story of the poem and I think the poet chose this title because it has a dark feel like the poem and seems to fit with the story. I think the poet is teaching us that we should not stop for death and keep going while death stops for you.

10: We Real Cool The Pool Players. Seven at the Golden Shovel. We real cool. We Left school. We Lurk late. We Strike straight. We Sing sin. We Thin gin. We Jazz June. We Die soon.

11: The title of the poem is "We Real Cool", I think the poem will be about friends trying to be cool because the title sounds like that kind of story. The poem paraphrased goes: The seven pool players at the Golden Shovel; we real cool, we left school, lurk late, strike straight, sing sin, thin gin, Jazz June, and die soon. There are some good imagery in the poem and the words seem pretty simple. The poet's seems to have a cool, nice feeling when writing this because it sounds nice and the words make it seem like the speaker is trying to act cool. There are five stanzas with two lines in each stanza, the sentences seem pretty short, and has some good rhyming so I think the shifting is simple. The title seems to fit with the poem and I think the poet chose this title because there are people in the real world that think these things are actually cool. The theme is that doing these things are actually cool and could get you killed and I think that is what the poet is trying to teach us.

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  • By: Sonny H.
  • Joined: almost 5 years ago
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About This Mixbook

  • Title: Mixbook Poetry Part II
  • Mixbook Poetry Part II by Sonny Hammoud.
  • Tags: Mixbook Poetry Part II Sonny Hammoud GMS
  • Started: over 4 years ago
  • Updated: over 4 years ago

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