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Student Teaching Spring 2010

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Student Teaching Spring 2010 - Page Text Content

S: Student Teaching Spring 2010 Janna Moes

FC: Student Teaching Spring 2010 Janna Moes

1: Student Teaching Spring 2010 Janna Moes Sartell Middle School Cooperating Teacher Gayle Swoboda January 4, 2010 - February 26, 2010 Sartell High School Cooperating Teacher Deb Rollings March 1, 2010 - April 30, 2010 | 1

3: Table of Contents About Me..........................................5 Sartell Middle School............................6 Middle School Lessons.......................7-15 Sartell High School.............................16 High School Lessons........................17-27 Conclusion.......................................28 | 3

5: About Me My name is Janna Moes. Growing up in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, an interest in art was sparked at a young age. At the age of six years old, I had already declared a desire to become an art teacher when I was older. With a Bachelor of Arts from the College of Saint Benedict in Saint Joseph, Minnesota, I have had four years filled with classes that have refined my own personal artistic abilities in addition to my skills as a K-12 art educator. I wish to share the discovery and wonder that I have experienced in art to the students in my classroom. My love for working with children and my passion for art combine to create a perfect opportunity to give back to my community. | 5

6: Under the supervision of Gayle Swoboda, I assumed the regular classroom duties of a middle school art teacher at Sartell Middle School in Sartell, Minnesota. Sartell Middle School has a student body of 1,013 students from 5th grade to 8th grade. During my eight weeks at Sartell Middle School, created a I developed an entire fifth grade curriculum along with contributions to the existing 6th, 7th, and 8th grade curriculum. | 6 | Sartell Middle School

7: Middle School Lessons | Wayne Thiebaud Pop Art Pastries | Watercolor Sunsets | 7

8: Wayne Thiebaud Pop Art Pastries 5th Grade | Learning Objectives Art History: The students will be able to identify the work of Wayne Thiebaud and the Pop Art Movement. The students will be able to compare the style of the Pop Art Movement to previous art movements studied. Art Aesthetics and Criticism: The students will be able to practice employing memory to create connections to art. Art Production: The students will be able to render ordinary objects in a manner reminiscent of Pop Art and the artwork of Wayne Thiebaud. The students will be able to recreate three-dimensional objects on two-dimensional paper using shape and shading of values to show form. The students will be able to develop techniques appropriate for the material. | 8

9: Procedure 1. On a piece of 6" x 9" white paper, draw with a pencil a pastry similar to Wayne Thiebaud's artwork. 2. Trace over all pencil lines with a Sharpie Marker. 3. Choose one side of your pastry to be the dark side and the other to be the light side. Shade with a colored pencil from the dark side to the light side by pushing harder with the colored pencil for the dark side and pressing lighter on the light side. 4. Cut out the pastry leaving a black Sharpie marker border around the outside. 5. Apply the tissue paper technique or "frosting" to your pastry. Selecting two colors of tissue paper; one for the dark side of your pastry and the other for light side. The middle of the frosted area should be half dark and half light. 6. To apply the tissue paper, cut a piece of tissue paper about 1" x 1" square. Center one piece of tissue paper on the end of a pencil creating a twisting motion around the end of the pencil. Put a dot of glue on the middle of the tissue paper. Push the tissue paper onto the pastry. LIft the pencil up leaving the tissue paper behind on the pastry. Repeat until the pastry is completely "frosted". 7. Glue the pastry onto a paper plate. Add a shadow underneath your pastry with a Sharpie Marker. | 9

10: Student Work | 10

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12: Watercolor Sunsets 7th and 8th Grade | Learning Objectives Art History: The students will be able to identify watercolor paintings. Art Aesthetics and Criticism: The students will be able to experience the aesthetic qualities of watercolor painting. Art Production: The students will be able to demonstrate the basic watercolor techniques in a watercolor painting of a sunset. | 12

13: Procedure 1. Begin by reviewing color terms such as primary colors, secondary colors, complementary colors, intermediate colors, intensity, warm colors, cool colors. 2. On a 9" x 6" piece of watercolor paper create a grid with 2" x 2" squares. Within each square practice watercolor techniques: flat wash, horizontal graded wash, vertical graded wash, wet on wet, high intensity, and low intensity. 3. Take a 12" x 9" piece of water color paper. With masking tape, tape the watercolor paper onto a watercolor board. Choose a sunset image to create a watercolor sunset from imitation. Draw in the contour lines of the sunset on the watercolor paper. 4. With watercolor paint, begin creating the watercolor sunset by beginning in the background and working to the foreground of the image. | 13

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16: Sartell High School | Under the supervision of Deb Rollings, I assumed the regular classroom duties of a high school art teacher at Sartell High School located in Sartell, Minnesota. Sartell High School has a school population of 1,009 students ninth grade to twelfth grade. During my eight weeks at Sartell High School, I taught full time for 7 weeks in Design and Drawing I classes. | 16

17: High School Lessons | Radial Balance Designs With Insects | Colored Pencil Accordion Drawing | 17

18: Learning Objectives Art History: The students will be able to identify art classified as mandalas, which are represented in a variety of cultures. Art Aesthetics and Criticism: The students will be able to experience the use of unconventional subjects. Art Production: The students will be able to create designs using radial balance shaded with colored pencil. | Radial Balance Designs With Insects Design Class (9th -12th Grade) | 18

19: Procedure 1. Create a grid for creating radial design start by drawing to diagonal lines from the corners of a 12" x 12" piece of paper. Draw two additional lines from the middle edges of the paper straight through the center of the paper. 2. When you are finished creating the grid, use the worksheet that show one piece of the grid to create a template for your design. Requirements for design: - Must have at least 2-3 different bugs represented on the grid piece. Bugs must be drawn realistically. - Must create a design with radial balance. - Must create a unique background for your design. 3. Trace your design on both sides of your grid piece. 4. Using carbon paper, repeat your grid piece design 8 times on the 12" x 12" white drawing paper. 5. Trace over all your lines with an ultra fine tip black Sharpie Marker. 6. Color your design with colored pencil. Colors do not need to be realistic but must be designed using a pattern of colors. | 19

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22: Colored Pencil Accordion Drawing Drawing I (9th - 12th Grade) | Learning Objectives Art History: The students will be able to discover the relatively new history of colored pencils. Art Aesthetics and Criticism: The students will be able to debate if the work of Mary Engelbreit is art. The students will be able to experience the use of colored pencils as a fine art material. Art Production: The students will be able to determine, from previous experience with the medium, the qualities of colored pencils. The students will be able to create two drawings, one of a musical instrument and the other transforming the instrument into a nature instrument. The students will be able to demonstrate colored pencil techniques on the two drawings they created. | 22

23: Procedure 1. On one sheet of 10" x 9" white drawing paper, divide the paper every 2". Draw a musical instrument from a photograph that takes up space in all five spaces. 2. Trace the instrument onto another piece of 10" x 9". 3. Recreate the traced instrument into a nature instrument. 4. Using a variety of hues, values, and intensities of colored pencils, color the musical instrument and nature instrument. Remember: - You cannot completely erase colored pencil. - Light pressure = less dense color. Heavy pressure = dense color. - When layering colors, apply the darkest value first with lighter values on top. - Let light and dark tones be joined by medium tones. - Allow strokes to follow the contour lines of the object. - Do not press heavy until you are ready for the last layer of colored pencil to be applied. 5. When finished adding colored pencil to both drawings, take one sheet of 22" x 9" white drawing paper to create the accordion fold. Laying your paper the long way horizontally, measure out 1" on each end. Fold on the 1" lines in the same direction. In between the 1" lines, measure every 2". Create an accordion fold by folding back and forth on the 2" lines. 6. On each drawing on the edge of the paper that measures 10", make 5 lines with a ruler every 2". 7. Glue strips onto the accordion folded paper. One piece of the drawing on each side of the rise and fall of the accordion fold so that one drawing can be seen from one angle of the accordion fold and the other drawing from the opposite angle. 8. Mount the drawing on colored construction paper. | 23

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28: Conclusion | 28 | Student teaching, above all other experiences, has reaffirmed my desire to become an art teacher. My sixteen weeks of student teaching only increased my longing to share, grow, and learn with my students. Through student teaching, I not only amplified my passion for teaching but I developed a deeper love for art. In conclusion, I am so thankful for the wonderful blessing to student teach with an encouraging staff and supportive cooperating teachers. Without their guidance and advice, I would not be the teacher that I am today. While it is difficult to leave the students and staff that I adore and admire, I am excited for the future. Currently, I can only image the setting, students, and staff that are in the future, but one thing is certain, I will be fulfilling what I was meant to be.

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