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The Question Mark

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The Question Mark - Page Text Content

FC: The Question Mark by Darcy Horn

1: Correct usages of the question mark: - Direct questions - After tag questions Incorrect usages of the question mark: - Indirect questions - Requests or instructions (to sound polite)

2: This "question" is posed on the New York Times website asking the reader if they are a home delivery subscriber. The question mark is placed incorrectly because it is not a direct question. | This question from the New York Times website is a direct question. The question mark is used properly.

3: This article title from www.Commondreams.org should not have a question mark because it is not asking a question. It is not saying, "Who was the Worst President in History?

4: " | The question mark in the movie title, "Dude, Where's my car?" is placed appropriately. It is asking a direct question.

5: The movie title, "Who framed Roger Rabbit" is a direct question and needs a question mark at the end of it.

6: The question that is on the homepage of Facebook, "What's on your mind?" is in fact a direct question, and the question mark is placed appropriately. | The question asked on the homepage of Twitter is, "What's happening?" This is a direct question and has an appropriate question mark at the end of it.

7: Not only does the question mark not fit in this sentence, but it is also placed in the wrong spot (inside of the apostrophes). This storyline from the Huffington Post is not asking a question. | This is an indirect question, which means the question mark is misused. This also came from the Huffington Post.

8: This is a valid, direct question on the iTunes website and the question mark is placed appropriately.

9: This is a direct question to the reader and the question mark is used correctly.

10: The movie title, "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner" needs a question mark at the end of it because it is asking a direct question.

11: This incorrect usage of the question mark appeared on NBC's Chris Matthews Show. It is an indirect question and therefore cannot have a question mark.

12: What will Christian Bale do after Batman? | Who could scare the Phillies? | Both of these questions come from AOL News. They are both valid and direct questions where the question mark is placed appropriately.

13: ESPN used the question mark correctly by putting it at the end of both of these direct questions.

14: This is an incorrect usage of the question mark because it is not a direct question. This "question" came from Expedia.com.

15: CNN posted this question on their website to take a toll of their readers' experiences. It is a direct question and the question mark is used correctly.

16: "What's on Your Hands?" is a direct question which means that the question mark is used correctly. This public service advertisements comes from the PA Department of Education.

17: "Got Milk?" is an indirect question and therefore should not have a question mark at the end of it. If it were to be, "Do you have milk?" then it would be a direct question and the question mark would be appropriate.

18: This is supposed to be asking the question, "Who cares?" but without a question mark it seems like "Who" is the person that is caring. www.surveymagnet.com

19: This is a direct question and it uses the question mark correctly. www.People.com | Yes, the first letter of the question should be capitalized, but this is a direct question from Amway and the question mark is used the right way. www.time.com

20: Both of these questions posed on www.time.com are sufficient and direct questions with the question mark used appropriately.

21: These two questions are both direct questions and are correct usages of the question mark. They come from the University of Pennsylvania's website.

22: "I never understood why mom's do that" is not a question, but merely a statement. This was taken from the article "Primetime in No Time" by Yahoo! TV.

23: THE END | This Lucky Strike cigarette advertisement poses a direct question and therefore uses the question mark correctly. www.lumang-tao-moments.blogspot.com

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  • By: Darcy H.
  • Joined: over 5 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 1
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About This Mixbook

  • Title: The Question Mark
  • Correct and incorrect usages of the question mark.
  • Tags: darcy, question mark
  • Published: over 5 years ago

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