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Compton Family Album

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Compton Family Album - Page Text Content

S: STAPP AND COMPTON FAMILY ALBUM

BC: Compton | Cousins

1: Remember the days of old and consider the generations long past. Deuteronomy 32:7

2: C O M P T O N | Edward L. Compton was born in 1802 in North Carolina to William Compton and Mary Raines. He married Susan Carelock of Morgan County Illinois, and they had six children: John C., Samuel, Cynthia, Elizabeth, Margaret, and William. They moved to Arkansas then settled in Burleson, TX. He served the Republic of Texas against the Mexican raids. No date of death is known, but he was last identified in the Census of 1870 in Corn Hill, Williamson Co, TX. | John Calhoun Compton with sons Charlie, Henry, and Tom | Son John Calhoun Compton (also identified as John Berry Compton) was born in 1825 in Morgan Co, Illinois. In 1850 he married Polly Berry, and together they had 10 children. They divorced and he married Margaret L. White Clanton, a widow with 3 children, and together they had 3 sons: Charlie,Tom,and Henry. The family moved from Bell County and settled in Shackelford Co, Texas in 1882, where they operated a commissary near the railroad and also ran a dairy. John bought land from the state in 1886 along Sandy Creek in Stephens County, where they made their home in 1892. A private in Captain Ross' Company with the Texas Mounted Volunteers, John fought in the Mexican War. John and Margaret are buried at Battle Creek Cemetery, a few miles from where they lived in Stephens County. The inscription on their headstone reads, "Our bodies will return to dust, but our names will always stand."

3: Charles Richard Compton was the oldest son of John C. Compton and second wife Margaret Clanton. He courted and married Mary Pearl Loven, daughter of Mrs. and Mrs.John Wesley Loven of Ibex.Together they had 9 children: Ernest, who drowned at age 8; Clarence; Charles Henry; CB, who was killed in an auto accident at age 22; RH; twins Tom and Bob; Maggie; and Frankie. They acquired the Loven property in Shackelford County and part of his parents' land in Stephens County but later lost parts of it during the Depression. They built their home with materials hauled from Cisco by wagon, with a trip beginning before daylight one day and ending after nightfall the next day. | Charles Richard "Charlie" Compton and wife Mary Pearl Loven | Charlie was a hard working man who believed in starting early, and staying late. One time during a drought, while driving cattle from Ibex to pasture near Ft.Griffin, they passed a place that had water. He said if the place was for sale, he would buy it. It was, and he did.

4: Charles was born prematurely on June 22, 1911 in Stephens County on the banks of Sandy Creek, the third child of Charlie and Pearl Compton.His aunt Rubye Compton nursed him and kept him in a shoe box on the wood burning stove to keep him alive. She said she could hold him in the palm of her hand and could fit a tea cup on his head and her wedding ring over his hand. *As a boy, Charles and his brothers rode their horses to school in Eolian, where the teacher would thaw their frozen hands in warm water, and later to Center Hill School, and finally to Ibex School. *When Charles was five and brother Clarence was eight, their father took them by wagon to the train depot in Moran, where he boarded them and sent them on their way to the Ft. Worth Fat Stock Show. Mrs.Kinnison, who ran the train depot, said, "My lands, Mr. Charlie, you'll never see those boys alive again." They had strict instructions to only talk to policemen, and they managed to get to a hotel, to see a performance of the rodeo, and to get safely home, much to the surprise of Mrs. Kinnison. | Charles Henry Compton

5: Father | Grand Mother | Grand Father | Great Grand Father | Great Grand Father | Great Grand Mother | Charles Henry Compton | Charles Richard Compton | Mary Pearl Loven | John Wesley Loven | Margaret White Clanton | John C. Compton | Susan Carelock b. 1806 S. Carolina | Edward L. Compton | b. 6-22-11 Stephens Co d. 7-3-88 Ft. Worth TX m. 9-9-31 Stephens Co | b. 2-18-83 Callahan Co. m. 9-10-05 Albany TX d. 7-13-56 Eolian TX | b. 9-3-1876 Albany TX m. 9-10-05 Albany TX d. 12-18-1934 Eolian TX | b. 11-25-1825 Morgan IL m. 10-12-1877 d. 1-5-1907 Eolian TX | b. 1802 in NC m. 5-21-1820 Jefferson Co IL d. | b.10-8-1852 Mississippi d. 2-2-16 Eolian TX | Edward L. Compton "A prosperous farmer and native of North Carolina" | Parents of Edward: f. William Compton b. about 1780 in Carolinas m.Mary Raines- Carolina Cherokee Indian | Ibex TX | Susan Carelock was thought to be of American Indian ancestry | Frankie | R.H. | Tom | Charles, Tom, Clarence, R.H.

6: Stapp | John Thomas Stapp and Anna Josephine Lindley | John Thomas Stapp was born in Georgia in 1854. He married Anna Josephine Lindley, daughter of Joseph Walker Lindley, in 1893 and had 10 children, with several of them born in Indian Territory: Tisha, Ida Bell, Katy, Milton, Virgil, Artie, William, Eugenia, and twins BE and DC.

7: Gene | Eugenia Marie Stapp was born in Oklahoma July 25, 1912 to Tom and Josephine Stapp. She loved clothes and during her marriage was able to have many modern conveniences due to the natural gas on their property. She contracted tuberculosis around 1940 and spent 9 months in a sanitorium in San Angelo.She was a gifted writer. Gene died of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 51.

8: & | Established | September 9, 1931 | Family | Eugenia Marie Stapp | Mother | b. 7-25-12 Shackelford Co. TX m. 9-9-31 Stephens Co d. 10-27-63 Eolian, TX | Anna Josephine Lindley | John Thomas Stapp | Saphonia Riddle | John Lindley | Harriet A. Johns | Milton Cook Stapp | Grandfather | Great Grandfather | Great Grandmother | Grandmother | Great Grandfather | Great Grandmother | b. 7-18-1872 Pinemills Wood, TX m. 2-14-1893 d. 2-11-61 Breckenridge, TX | b. Mississippi | b. 12-18-1854 Alabama m. 2-14-1893 d. 6-28-39 Breckenridge, TX | b. 1826 Tennessee | b. 12-25-1812 Georgia m. 7-8-1880 Wood, TX d. 11-21-17 LaCasa, TX | John M. Riddle 1835 | Jane Stephens | Georgia | Georgia | Louisiana | Georgia | Georgia | Compton

9: The Story of Charles and Gene | Charles' older brother Clarence and his wife O.B. arranged the first date between Gene and Charles. They married after 3 years of courtship on September 9, 1931. Charles was 20 and Gene was 19. They lived in Ibex in a small house that Charles bought for $50 on 149 acres of land purchased for $2500. In 1939 they built their home in southwest Stephens County near Sandy Creek, on land patented to Charles' grandfather. They resided there until their deaths in 1963 and 1988.

10: The Comptons Eolian, Texas

11: Friends come and go, but sisters are FOREVER!

12: Colene | Born in Breckenridge on November 22, 1933

13: Gwenda | Born at the home place near Ibex on February 2, 1937 with the help of a midwife, Mrs. Boyett

14: Sue | School Birthday August 24 | Born at the home place near Ibex on September 24, 1938 with the help of a midwife, Mrs. Boyett

15: Donna Jean | Born at the home place near Eolian on June 5, 1945

16: Donna Jean "Tincer"

17: "Tincer" Donna Jean Compton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas H. Compton. Sister of Colene, Sue, and Gwenda. She was born June 5, 1945. She had blond hair, and grey, greenish, blue eyes. She was fairly dark skinned. She loved horses and loved to ride. She was one of the best children riders. On her sixth birthday,, she got a red saddle. She was very proud of it and everybody that came had to see. She would either pack it from the lot or drag it out there. She also liked to ride backward. She learned to ride on "Old Tony". When he died she took over "Zebra". She would ride him very good. She also liked rodeos. Every time she went to one she would come back with ideas about training Zebra to be a barrel horse, a cutting horse, and a trick horse. Starting on tricks, she'd stand in the saddle and ride side saddle. Once in the field she went one way and he went the other. That was when she was about five years, four months old. When she was about four she was drugged off and was throwed several other times. She liked to ride "Black Beauty." Jerry Clay Woods, her cousin, very good friend, and almost constant playmate. Jerry had a saddle like Tincers except it was black. They loved to play together and was playing at a rig when Tincer was killed by a pipe. Tincer also liked to swim and had no fear of water. She could swim some at five and the summer before she was killed she could swim about 10-15 feet underwater, could float, could swim on her back and a little on her stomach. Like all kids she had stunts she would do or try to do. Once I took her and Jerry swimming in a tank near our house. They really had a good time. Tincer was never sick much. She had the measles followed by pneumonia at the age of about 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 years. She had occasional colds, ear aches, etc. She liked me to hold her and dance with her especially to fast tunes. She liked bubble gum and to blow bubbles. She liked to ride her tricycle. She liked chocolate ice cream. She like to put on earbobs. She like to go to Eureka on Tuesday nights for church and Sunday School. She liked to go see Virgil (Uncle Virgil). He was her boyfriend. She liked Glenn Compton best of all boys. She liked Teddy Joe Coffman, hers and Colene's partnership boyfriend. She like Grapettes (a soda pop). She liked chewing gum of all kinds. She like flowers, orchids especially. She liked dogs. Shortly before she went away, Ot (Ottis) or Uncle Henry, I remember not which, gave her a solid black puppy. She named him Rocket. They were good friends and she was fussy about who could hold him. She liked wheels (made of leftover pie crust with cinnamon and sugar.) She liked long hair and always wished hers was long and naturally curly. She liked music and liked to listen to the radio. Favorite songs were "Tiny Jane", anything by Lefty Frizell especially "If You Got the Money I Got the Time", "Chocolate Ice Cream Cone", and "Shotgun Boogie". She did not like to sleep in the daytime. She liked to play and swing. She liked to go to school. She always looked forward to going to school for a long time. She went to school four days. She learned "Five Little Pigs", "Jack Be Nimble Jack Be Quick", "Baa Baa Black Sheep," and a kind of like poem acted out about putting your right foot in, taking it out, give it a shake and turn myself about, etc. She liked to read, especially funny papers. She liked dolls and paper dolls.

18: I took her to the show and swimming a lot. I took her to see "Red Pony", a show about a little boy and his horse and she cried and cried when the horse died. She had an imaginary friend named Penana. She talked about her friend for about three or four years. She had a new imaginary boyfriend named Len. The Christesson girls were good friends of hers. They were Judy, Dee, Ethel (especially was her friend. They were about the same age), Debby, and Libby Kay. Katy Lou, Jerry Lee and Barbara Dee always played with her a lot. She could get along and play with just about any kids. She, in my opinion, was very smart for her age. She knew quite a lot about cattle, horses, etc. She could unsaddle and unbridle her horse. She could sew on buttons, dry dishes, etc. She liked to try and play the piano and a little toy clarinet. She had two registered cows and a black Angu (1/2 Angus 1/2 Hereford) cow that Don gave her because she was named after him. Her brand was DC. She had a yearling heifer also. She had her own bank account. She and I got a corduroy shirt (different colors) alike at Stephenville. She and Jerry Clay would cry to go and see one another, cry and fuss and fight when together, and cry when they had to leave. Uncle Henry gave her and Jerry Clay their pick of a bunch of his baby calves. Tincer took the littlest one of the group. Jerry, the biggest. Tincer, the sweetest, most darling little girl I've ever or I'll ever know, was killed Sunday, September 9, 1951 and put to rest September 11, 1951. Almost one hundred sent flowers, almost two hundred cars came for the funeral, and no count on how many came. The funeral was at the home. The casket was white with blue. She was dressed in a beautiful yellow dress, yellow slip, white panties, and yellow anklets. The pall bearers were Virgil Morris, Don Compton, Ot Compton, and Clayton Whitfield. Burial in the Battle Creek Cemetery. It was a beautiful funeral and darling Donna looked like a great big doll, so still and quiet. It didn't seem liked her, she was always so gay and active. But she was indeed lovely. The preachers were Brother Cole Jackson and Brother Corky. The choir sang "Precious Memories" and "Safe in the Arms of Jesus." I loved her and I am sure she is happy up in Heaven with God and I hope to go see her someday. Gwenda Compton 10/6/51 | Things I gave or bought her that I remember: a red corduroy skirt, a red sweater, a green corduroy suit, a grey sweater (Christmas), a yellow bathing suit (5th b. day), an aqua sundress (for Mama), a yellow eyelet dress (4th birthday), a little pinafore for her first birthday, a thin yellow dress (Easter), a pair of natural moccasins (6th birthday) | I took her to the show and swimming a lot. I took her to see "Red Pony", a show about a little boy and his horse and she cried and cried when the horse died. She had an imaginary friend named Penana. She talked about her friend for about three or four years. She had a new imaginary boyfriend named Len. The Christesson girls were good friends of hers. They were Judy, Dee, Ethel (especially was her friend. They were about the same age), Debby, and Libby Kay. Katy Lou, Jerry Lee and Barbara Dee always played with her a lot. She could get along and play with just about any kids. She, in my opinion, was very smart for her age. She knew quite a lot about cattle, horses, etc. She could unsaddle and unbridle her horse. She could sew on buttons, dry dishes, etc. She liked to try and play the piano and a little toy clarinet. She had two registered cows and a black Angu (1/2 Angus 1/2 Hereford) cow that Don gave her because she was named after him. Her brand was DC. She had a yearling heifer also. She had her own bank account. She and I got a corduroy shirt (different colors) alike at Stephenville. She and Jerry Clay would cry to go and see one another, cry and fuss and fight when together, and cry when they had to leave. Uncle Henry gave her and Jerry Clay their pick of a bunch of his baby calves. Tincer took the littlest one of the group. Jerry, the biggest. Tincer, the sweetest, most darling little girl I've ever or I'll ever know, was killed Sunday, September 9, 1951 and put to rest September 11, 1951. Almost one hundred sent flowers, almost two hundred cars came for the funeral, and no count on how many came. The funeral was at the home. The casket was white with blue. She was dressed in a beautiful yellow dress, yellow slip, white panties, and yellow anklets. The pall bearers were Virgil Morris, Don Compton, Ot Compton, and Clayton Whitfield. Burial in the Battle Creek Cemetery. It was a beautiful funeral and darling Donna looked like a great big doll, so still and quiet. It didn't seem liked her, she was always so gay and active. But she was indeed lovely. The preachers were Brother Cole Jackson and Brother Corky. The choir sang "Precious Memories" and "Safe in the Arms of Jesus." I loved her and I am sure she is happy up in Heaven with God and I hope to go see her someday. Gwenda Compton 10/6/51 | Things I gave or bought her that I remember: a red corduroy skirt, a red sweater, a green corduroy suit, a grey sweater (Christmas), a yellow bathing suit (5th b. day), an aqua sundress (for Mama), a yellow eyelet dress (4th birthday), a little pinafore for her first birthday, a thin yellow dress (Easter), a pair of natural moccasins (6th birthday)

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  • Title: Compton Family Album
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