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Family History - Page Text Content

S: Montgomery-Shurtz Family History

FC: "Learn from yesterday, live for today, hope for tomorrow." | Montgomery-Shurtz Family History

1: Here's the story before two people fell in love- where they came from and who those special people are that make us who we are. | Roger Guy Shurtz, born May 3, 1947, met Dorothy Lynne' Montgomery, born March 30, 1950, at BYU the summer of 1971. That quick summer away from Utah State for Roger turned into a lifetime of blessings for all of us. They were set up on a blind date by Roger's cousin and before long, they were engaged and set to be married on December 10, 1971. But before Roger and Lynne', who we know and love so well, there were others, many others who played a crucial role in making them who they are. While most of them are now gone from us, we knew them once in heaven, they know us now, and we will meet them again when our life is completed. They are special to us and it is important that we learn about their life and legacy as they make us who we are.

2: Table of Contents | page 1 | page 3 | page 15 | page 13 | page 11 | page 17 | Lynn Thomas Montgomery | Robert Arthur Montgomery | Veta Rae Thomas | Dorothy Lynne' Montgomery | Dorothy Jean Bingham | Charles James Bingham | Myrtle Maria Silcock | Alma Montgomery | Elizabeth Chadwick | Albert Augustus Thomas | Ida Alice Elmer | Willard Eugene Bingham | Hannah McFarland | Alma DeMarquis Silcock | Maria Rishton

3: page 9 | page 5 | page 7 | page 23 | page 21 | page 19 | page 25 | Roger Guy Shurtz | Lane Spencer Shurtz | June Memmott | Frelen Shurtz | Stella Isabelle Spencer | Eugene Memmott | Lillie Ingaborg Jensen | Peter Shurtz (Shirts) | Harriet Derinda Moody | Joseph Spencer | Mary Malinda Thompson | James Ammon Memmott | Susan Agnes Ivie | Jens Peter Jensen | Inga Lisa Johannesson | Eugene Losee

4: Lynn Thomas Montgomery | Born January 9, 1928 in Ogden, Utah, at his Grandparents’ home Married Nov 30, 1948 in Salt Lake Temple to Dorothy Jean Bingham Son of Robert Arthur Montgomery and Veta Rae Thomas Had 6 children. Dorothy Lynne' was their first child. Lynn is known for being a hard worker. He built their home and continued to add-on to it over the years, making it considerably larger over time. He moved back to the farm because he felt it was the best place to raise his family. He has a strong testimony of the gospel and always tries to listen to what the Spirit tells him. He served in many church callings, including Bishop and Stake Clerk. | 1 | When Lynn was 2 years old they were living in Ely, Nevada, and he was flying a large celluloid toy airplane around the room, like little boys do, and came too close to the pot-belly stove (which was red hot from the coal fire inside). The plane burst into flames and the fire engulfed his right hand and his hair. Lynn began to run when his dad grabbed a rug, caught him and wrapped it around him and smothered the flames. His mother had a bowl full of eggs and she immediately cracked the eggs and plunged Lynn’s hand into the bowl of egg yolks. Dr. Elmer Hinckley said that if his mom hadn’t done that, he would have probably lost his fingers. When they unwrapped the bandages, his thumb and pointer finger had grown together. One day when he and his brother Bob were fooling around, he hooked his hand on Bob’s bib overalls and the force of it pulled the thumb and finger apart. Although it didn’t completely pull them apart, it did give him enough freedom to have the use of his thumb. | In 1960 Lynn went to work full-time with Green Giant Co. in Buhl. In 1961, he started working for their Container Division (later sold to American Can), manufacturing cans. When the can division closed down in 1986, he took early retirement. He worked for the church as a custodian and as key man for the PM Group until retiring for a second time in 1993 at age 65. He always said that “the only thing better than retiring is working”. | When the family moved to Buhl, they pitched a big white canvas tent on the canal bank to live in. Lynn got scarlet fever that summer and his mother wouldn’t let him out of bed, so his older brother Bob snuck in and stayed with him to play and keep him company. They put their dad’s big fuzzy yellow gloves on their feet and pretended that they were monkeys on the bed.

5: 2 | Art, Dad Bert, Lynn | Lynn and Dorothy holding Pam Lynne' and Greg | Bob (Lynn's brother) and Lynn on the truck their dad hauled milk in | Greg, Lynn, Lynne', Pam | Lynn tells how he met Dorothy "We used to have an hour for lunch. My friend Ivan had a Model A sedan that he drove. We were in his car and went to town on the lunch hour. We were parked at the curb in front of Pennys on Main Street when these two girls walked by. It was Dorothy’s first day of school and she was with Lila Blair. They were on their way back to school and walking on the sidewalk in front of the store when it started to rain. We asked if they wanted a ride to school, and they said yes. So they got in the back seat, and that’s when I first met Dorothy. " | Carolyn: We were taking a drive with Grandpa & Grandma and Grandpa was singing a song and Grandma started singing along and Grandpa said “now you’re remembering” and they laughed. Grandpa said “you wouldn’t know it, but I used to be very romantic.” Then Grandma laughed, smiled, and winked at him. | "We nominated her for Junior class secretary that afternoon, and she was elected. Later, after a fireside, I invited her to drive to Balanced Rock with a group of friends. We had car trouble, and everyone got home late (it was almost daylight). Dorothy’s parents never did give me a bad time about it. We went to all the dances and the Junior Prom and went steady after that. It was something to talk about." | His wife Dorothy suffered from Alzheimers, and he lovingly took care of her for several years until her death in October of 2010. One of their favorite things to do was to drive to Costco and walk around the store tasting the samples so that Dorothy could get her exercise. Later when she could no longer walk, he pushed her around the store in her wheelchair. All of the “sample” ladies knew them by name.

6: Dorothy Jean Bingham Montgomery | Born November 9, 1928, in Burley, Idaho Died October 8, 2010, in Wendell, Idaho Married November 30, 1948, in Salt Lake Temple Daughter of Charles James Bingham and Myrtle Maria Silcock. Had 6 children. Dorothy Lynne' was her first child. Dorothy was known for being a great cook, baking amazing bread, and always sewing, crocheting, quilting or knitting for her family. She also loved to work in her garden. She used her skills to serve her family throughout her life. | Dorothy Jean (Bingham) Montgomery was the 7th of 8 children. Her father farmed for a living, so she was taught how to work. Her mother always told her and her sisters “Callers don’t come before 10 o’clock.”, so the dishes and dusting had to be done, the beds made, and the floor scrubbed (on hands and knees) every day before 10. Meals were prepared at a regular time so the chores could be done on schedule and so her Dad and the boys would have strength to do the heavy farm work. The girls also helped in the fields when needed—pulling potato vines, thinning beets, weeding the garden, hauling hay. There were fun times, too, playing Tag, Kick the Can, Run Sheep Run, baseball, and other children’s games. Later, she worked for a time as a clerk for J.J. Newberry’s and J.C. Penney’s and as a secretary for Green Giant. | She moved a lot over the next few years, including a year in Buhl. During her short stay in Buhl, she met Lynn Thomas Montgomery. In her words: One Sunday as I went to church, I saw Lynn come in and a very special feeling came over me that he was the “one”. They continued to date after she moved from Buhl, and were married November 30, 1948, in the Salt Lake Temple. | 3 | Lynne', Dorothy and Lynn

7: Dorothy loved music. Her mother loved to sing as she worked around the house and in the fields. Dorothy and her sisters would sing and harmonize as they did the dishes. Later she would sing with ward choirs and the “Singing Mothers” in Relief Society. She taught herself to play the piano and served as pianist in Primary and Relief Society. After retirement, Lynn bought an organ, and she and Lynn took organ lessons together for 15 years. | Dorothy learned how to cook, embroider, knit, crochet, sew, and quilt from her mother. She used all of her talents to bless the lives of her children, and each family claims quilts, baby quilts, afghans, and Christmas ornaments that were all made by her. She crocheted at least 48 Christmas stockings for members of the family. We also have fond memories of her cooking and of hot bread coming out of the oven. Later in life, Dorothy started taking painting lessons. The walls of their home are covered with her beautiful paintings, and each of her children has at least one painting in their home. | Lynn and Dorothy had six children: Dorothy Lynne’, Greg, Pamela, Scott, Bart, and Brett. They have lived in Buhl and Twin Falls, Idaho; Layton, Utah; and, from 1958 to the present, on the farm on the Northside near Wendell, Idaho. Dorothy has a strong testimony of the Gospel, and has served in callings in most of the organizations of the church. She died on October 8, 2010, of complications from Alzheimers and diabetes. At the time of her death, she and Lynn had 32 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren. | 4 | Dorothy, on the right, and her sister Marie | Pam, Greg, Lynne', Bart, Scott, Brett

8: Lane Spencer Shurtz | Born July 28, 1922 in Escalante, Utah Died January 6, 1951 in Sugarville, Utah Married June Memmott on June 20, 1946 in the Manti Temple Son of Frelen Shurtz and Stella Isabelle Spencer Had 2 children: Roger Guy and Beverly June Lane was known for being very shy and quiet. He did not like to sing. When he was put into the Sunday School Presidency and had to sit on the stand, shortly after he and June were married, he would mouth the words to the songs rather than sing out loud. He didn't like to be late for anything. He was a very hard worker, very dependable, and he was loved by all who knew him. | When Lane was 12 years old, he and his older brother Guy were out in the field cutting hay. At one point they had to stop and fix the mower. Guy thought that Lane was ready and so he giddyupped the team to start them. Lane was leaning over to grab the reigns of the other team and when the horses started moving, he was knocked off. He fell right in front of the blades on the mower, which rolled him along. He was cut badly on his back, the backs of his legs and his toes on his left foot were cut completely off. He was rushed to Salt Lake City, where he had surgery and had to stay in the hospital for six weeks. His mother stayed with him. | Lane was accident prone. He fell off a pile of rocks as a young child and cut his head. He was nearly swept away by a flash flood while fishing in the mountains. He was nearly shot in the stomach when his friend's gun went off while he was cleaning it. Lane moved out of the way right before the gun went off. | 5 | Lane 3rd from right

9: Lane served in the Merchant Marines during WWII from 1944-1946. He had wanted to join the Navy, but was unable to because he was missing toes on his left foot. His brothers Guy and Cecil were also serving in the war. The Merchant Marine's job was to transport ammunition and supplies for the troops in the Pacific. Lane's ship followed the regular Navy ships and so at each port, he would inquire whether his brother Cecil's ship was there. Finally in Tseinsen, China, Cecil heard his name called to report to the deck, and there was Lane! His ship had finally caught up with Cecil's. After hugs, greetings and a tour of the ship, Lane had to leave. It was exciting for them to meet up during the war. While serving in the Merchant Marines, when they were out at sea and knew that they were safe, the sailors would put cargo nets over the side and let the crew swim. One time, a sailor got into trouble in the water and was about to drown. Lane jumped in, rescued him and helped him get back aboard. The man was so appreciative that he gave Lane a knife as a gift. | Guy, Lane and Cecil were very close in age and were good friends while growing up. They were often called the Three Musketeers. They had fun taking chickens up to the top of a water tower (20-30 feet high), throwing them off and watching them flap their wings all the way to the ground. One time they stole some honey from someone and Lane ate so much that he got sick. After that he could never eat honey very much. When the three brothers were 13, 14 and 15, they all came down with Scarlet Fever. Their mother quarantined them to a building behind the house until they recovered. They thought it was great fun to live out there. They had a bed and their mother brought them their meals every day. After they were well, she learned that they hadn't been by themselves out there. Every night they would invite a bunch of the neighborhood kids in. Luckily, no one else ended up with Scarlet Fever. | Lane was killed in 1951 at age 28, when his tractor tipped over on him, leaving behind his wife June and their two children, Roger and Beverly. | At one point, the boys' dad decided to farm sugar beets. When the boys had had enough of hoeing the beets, Lane and Cecil decided to run away to Nevada to work on a cattle ranch for the rest of their lives. They took their bikes and were doing well until Cecil dropped their water bottle and it broke. Soon their thirst kicked in and they decided they had better wait to run away until they were a little better prepared. They arrived home that night and were a little disappointed that no one seemed very concerned about where they had been. Their mother later said that she had so many kids running away all the time that it was “an old thing” to her. | 6

10: June Memmott Losee | Born June 11, 1927 in Oasis, Utah Married and sealed to Lane Shurtz in the Manti Temple on June 20, 1946. Married for time to Eugene Losee in the St George Temple on July 1, 1952. Daughter of Eugene Memmott and Lillie Ingaborg Jensen Had 8 children. Roger was her first child. June is known for her great sense of humor, her positive attitude, and her joy for life. She is extremely friendly and outgoing and can make friends with anybody. She has used this talent to become a great member missionary. | 7 | June Memmott (named after the month she was born) was the third of 10 children: Alice, Harold Eugene, June, Berdell “J”, Melvin Cleone, Cleathan Grant, Inga Mae, Veola, Lawrence Devon, and Glenda Joyce. Harold Eugene died of pneumonia and whooping cough nine months before June was born. | June remembers: Playing “Hide & Seek, Kick the Can, Sitting Pretty, Here Comes an Old Woman With a Stick & Staff, and Run, Sheepy, Run”. Running – and winning – foot races on the 4th of July. With her 25 cents prize she could buy a pop, crackerjack, popcorn, ice cream cone, and candy bar because they only cost 5 cents each. Winning the spelling bee in second grade. Learning to play “Old Black Joe, Auld Lang Syne, & Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes” on the harmonica in 3rd & 4th grade. Being baptized in a canal southeast of Scipio and confirmed right after as she sat on the running board of a car. Memorizing a poem in 6th grade titled “Little Blossom” about the evils of drinking – which she can still quote to this day. Riding in a wagon pulled by a team of horses to the ranch where her dad would cook dinner out in the open over a bonfire. Being in musicals, plays, & pep club and dancing and dating in high school. | In 1931, the family moved to Scipio, where they lived until her 9th grade year. At that time they moved to Sugarville, Utah, until her senior year of high school (during World War II), when she moved to Manti, Utah, and lived with her sister Alice. She worked at the Parachute Plant a few hours before school each day. She also worked at a grocery store and a hardware/furniture store in Manti.

11: 8 | Her parents taught her how to work hard. She helped raise a garden and bottle food for the family. She learned how to make a home cozy, clean, and comfortable and prepare good meals for the family. She worked with Gene on the farm, but, eventually, also worked for a few years as a teacher’s aide at the elementary school. | June and Lane had two children together, Roger and Beverly. For about a year they pioneered it at their home in Sugarville without any electricity, using gas lights, coal and oil stoves, and an outdoor canvas cooler, throwing water over it 2 or 3 times a day to keep the contents cool. A tragic farm accident crushed Lane under his tractor in a canal east of their home on 1/6/1951, leaving her a widow with two small children. | June married Eugene Douglas Losee on 7/1/1952. He had a 4 year old daughter Barbara. They later were blessed with two more sons--David & Steven, and three more daughters--Sheila, Marsha, & Cindy. (David died at age 24 in a car wreck.) They combined the two 80-acre farms and bought another 40 acres, farming 200 acres in all. They lived in the basement home, eventually building a home above it when they could afford it. They were married just short of 60 years when Gene passed away in 2012. June has a strong testimony of the Gospel and continues to make her home on the farm in Sugarville.

12: Eugene Losee | Born Aug. 14, 1921 in Sugarville, Utah Died April 2, 2012 in Sugarville, Utah Married Beatrice Moulton in the Salt Lake Temple on Aug 12, 1946. Married for time to June Memmott Shurtz in the St. George Temple on July 1, 1952 Son of Isaac Huff Losee and Roxie Ann Young Had 8 children. When he married June, he had a daughter Barbara and raised Roger & Bev as his own children. They had 5 more children together. Gene was known for his love for farming. Up until the day he died he wanted to be out working on his farm. He was an extremely hard worker and could fix any machinery that needed it. He built a barn 200 ft. long when he was nearly 80! Gene loved to tell jokes, sing songs, and loved to dance, especially with June. He loved to listen to the accordion and banjo and would get up and dance even when he was really frail. He could also whistle 7 ways! Gene was always faithful in the gospel. | 9 | Gene: “I farmed 200 acres most of my life. We would spray for dotter in the alfalfa with me and Roger sitting on tractor seats on opposite sides of the truck riding on big booms that stuck out about eight feet from the center of the truck. Beverly sat in the middle on her little bench helping us spot dotter. As we spotted the dotter we would stop and spray it to keep it from spreading and taking over the alfalfa. We were jabbering the whole time and it was kind of pleasant. Barbara was driving the truck and since her legs weren’t long enough to touch the clutch to push it in, I had to put a wooden block on the clutch so she could reach it to stop when we couldn’t spray the dotter on the go.” | Gene: “When I was young and Dad was out working, a fierce wind came through that was stronger than our little home. Since it was washday Mom had a big tub of water with the clothes in it that she was washing. She had the tub on the stove over a hot fire. When the house turned over, the furniture and everything tumbled around in there and the hot coals from the stove set the house on fire. Mom took the wet clothes and pounded the fire out. Then they put a chair to the upside down window and crawled out, since they couldn’t get the door open. When Dad was coming home he thought things didn’t look just right. When he got closer he could see what happened. His little family was out sitting on the ditch bank waiting for him to come home.”

13: 10 | When World War II broke out in 1941, Gene had passed a test to train and work as a machinist at Hill Field. By the end of 1942, he decided to enlist in the service choosing the Army Air Corp over the Navy. He was in the service just a little over three years – two of which he was overseas in Europe. He serviced the planes and the guns on the fighter planes during the war, often within 10 miles of the front. He remembers sailing to England on a ship that zig-zagged across the ocean to avoid submarines and being in England when the Germans were bombing London. He was in England, France, Belgium, and Germany during the war. His brothers Glen and Cecil were also in Europe. His best friend Guy Shurtz (Lane’s older brother) was killed when the bomber he co-piloted crashed after bombing Germany. | Gene: “I went to work at Dugway as a fireman when the older kids were going to college and going on missions. Once out to Dugway an F16 made an emergency landing. I had my fire fighting suit and gear on. The firemen had to put blocks in front of the jet wheels to keep it from rolling and while I was doing that the pilot mistakenly shut down the emergency power, which turned off the brake. That caused the heavy plane to lunge into my path. My co-worker jerked me out of the way just in time to save me from being crushed. The wheel did run over my steel-toed boot and broke my big toe. When I thanked my friend for saving me, he said he hadn’t touched me, he didn’t have time. It must have been my guardian angel. I’m grateful to my Heavenly Father for His protection of my life many times.” | “My advice for my posterity is to take advice earlier in your life that some oldsters have to offer and thrash it over in your mind and see if you can use it to your advantage. Also life is good – enjoy it.”

14: Robert Arthur Montgomery | Born October 30, 1900 in North Ogden, Utah Died July 18, 1998 in Wendell, Idaho Married April 25, 1924 in Salt Lake City, Utah Sealed May 25, 1932 in Salt Lake Temple Son of Alma Montgomery and Elizabeth Chadwick Had 6 children, Lynn Thomas was his second child. Robert was known around town as a child for being "The little boy who always rode the big black horse". As a young college student he was known for being the best student in ancient history his professor had ever had. As a man he was known for being a hard worker, inventing the boiler at Green Giant, being a machinist, and his love for his wife. As a great-grandfather he was known for giving the kids ice cream cones every time they came to visit and loving to read old western novels. | When Robert was young he had a couple of near-death experiences. One time when he was bringing a car home to Ogden from Idaho Falls with his brother-in-law (who was driving because he didn't trust Robert to do it) and just outside of Logan he drove right in front of a train. The car was cut in half and he woke up three days later in Logan hospital. His nurse brought his clothes in and the backs were completely gone. Another time when he was a young boy a horse rolled over him and neither him or the horse had any broken bones. He always felt someone above had intervened. There was also time his horse was hit by lightning while he was on it and while the horse died, he only had a little burn on the top of his head from a brass button. He said once "I firmly believe I was sent back to get this family, and to me they are the celestial world." | 11 | Robert loved Vetie more than anything. He wrote expressing his love for her in his personal history more times than can be counted and said that the day they met he heard a clear voice that said "That is she". Then he said of the day she promised to be his "I was the most lucky guy in this whole universe and I haven't changed my thinking in any way right up to this moment. Later he said "She is my whole life and without her there will be nothing, here or anywhere else."

15: 12 | The Montgomery Family picture: L to R (Back Row): Parla Montgomery, Ron & Devera Alvey, Bert & Jennie Montgomery, Karen & John Vecera, Dorothy Montgomery. L to R (Seated): Max Montgomery, Robert and Veta, Lynn Montgomery | The closest Robert ever came to death was when he was 17. He was trying to catch one of their more wild ponies and ended up being drug all over wrapped up in barbed wire. In his own words: "I got some kind of poison from that rusty wire that had hung there for years and my fever kept getting higher and higher and I went into a coma...they said I could not possibly live and I didn't. There was absolutely no pain of any kind when I left my body. I went over to the dresser and pulled the drawer open and picked up my shirt and for the first time I noticed something different. The dresser drawer was still shut but its exact duplicate was open before me and also my shirt. I turned then and saw my body on the bed... Where the wall of my room should have been there was just a thin gray mist. I...stepped through the mist into the most beautiful world anyone could not have conceived of....it was the most beautiful grounds with a large white stone building in the center of it... | There were People, men and women, going and coming up the walk leading up to the big white building and so I ...went up there too... There was no lock on the door, but when I pushed...it would not open." at this time people were going in and out but Robert couldn't get in. He continues "A man standing there spoke to me and said it is not possible to enter, unless you have permission. If you have permission go on in. I tried again with the same result. The man smiled and said, 'It is apparent that you have other things to do. I am afraid you will have to go back'. It came to me right forcibly at that moment that I was in that element that Christ spoke of , when He said to the man nailed to the cross beside Him, "This day you will be with me in paradise". Robert then went back through the mist and into his body. At that time he woke up and got well again. | Chad holding Khalina, Lynne', Lynn, and Robert (in chair-almost 97 yrs old) | Robert was an extremely hard worker. He spent years working at a mines where he was told in a letter of recommendation that he was one of the four best mining engineers in the world. He also spent 20 years at Green Giant where he was their head mechanic. They used his ideas to improve production and after he retired they continued to come to him for help.

16: Veta Rae Thomas | Born October 6, 1902, in Ogden (Slaterville), Utah Died April 26, 1987, in Wendell, Idaho Married to Robert Arthur Montgomery on April 25, 1924 Sealed May 25, 1932 in Salt Lake Temple Daughter of Albert Augustus Thomas and Ida Alice Elmer (She was the second child of four children.) Veta Rae was known for her short stature, her wonderful cooking, and her cleanliness and tidiness in her home. She was also known for her smiley and bubbly personality. Veta loved to collect lamps & little toy dishes. | 13 | Veta Rae’s dad was very proud of the Thomas name. He told his sons that he would pay them $1,000 to have a boy, but neither did. | Robert’s cousin introduced them, who was Veta’s best friend. When Robert saw her, she had a halo around her and he knew that she was the reason why he had to come back (to life after dying). | Veta had a very happy and cheerful personality. The only time her son Lynn ever saw her sad was when he had to deliver the telegrams to her about Bob being injured and then dying (Okinawa, Japan- May, 12, 1945). It took her a lot of years to get over that. When Scott (her grandson) got his mission call to Japan, she told him he couldn’t go- that the Japanese already took one of her boys. He went, and while he was there, a member’s father told his teenage son that he could come to the United States if he could find a family to sponsor him. So Scott asked his parents, and they said they would do it. Brett and Bart picked the boy up from the airport, and when they brought him home, they took him in to meet grandma (Veta). She threw her arms around him and said “Why, you’re just like one of the boys.” That was the moment that she finally got over her grief and forgave the Japanese.

17: 14 | Veta & Robert were always very active in the church. Veta served a lot in Sunday School & Primary. | Veta never learned to drive. She always had her husband to drive her around, and when the boys got older, they took on that responsibility. | Veta had morning sickness the whole nine months with her oldest son, Bob, and lost so much weight that she weighed only sixty pounds. The doctor told her he would have to take the baby to save her life and she told him that he would have to bury them both because he wasn't going to touch her baby. Her husband took her back to her parents’ farm in Ogden on 28th street to give birth to all of her children. When she had Lynn, Robert was working in Ely, NV at the copper pit because all the farmers had to get winter jobs. She was living out there with him, and when it was time to have the baby, he took her back to her parents’ house. After Lynn was born, Veta went back to Ely and left the baby with her parents for three or four months. | Veta & Robert moved to Idaho in 1930 and lived in a tent for the summer. Lynn had a cousin that wanted to go on a mission, but he had a milk truck (condensed milk) that he ran so Robert took over the milk truck and made payments on it, and the payments paid for the cousin’s mission. In 1935 they moved to “the farm” in Wendell, Idaho. It is the same farm that Lynn farmed with his brother Bert and that they live on today. With the four boys, Bob, Lynn, Max, and Bert, they thought that they had their family, but 2 little girls, Karen and Devera, were both surprises. Veta had Karen when she was 44 and Devera when she was 46, completing their family.

18: In 1913, when Charles was 21, he was introduced to his future wife, Myrtle Maria Silcock. They hooked their horse, Bell, to the old surrey (a carriage) and drove to the Ogden, UT Court House to get married. The first winter after they were married they lived with Charles’ parents and he made 15 cents an hour working 12-hour shifts at the sugar factory. Charles and Myrtle lived in several homes, often with family during their early years, working long hard days farming. | Charles James Bingham | Born February 5, 1892 in Wilson (Ogden), Utah Died January 31, 1976 in Twin Falls, Idaho Married Myrtle Maria Silcock on November 20, 1913 in Ogden, Utah Sealed January 12, 1921 in the Salt Lake Temple Son of Willard Eugene Bingham and Hannah McFarland Had 8 children. Dorothy Jean was the 7th child Charles was known for being a really hard worker, farming for years. He was a quiet man but was a great father and loved the gospel. | 15 | In 1918, World War I ended, and the flu hit. The 1918 flu pandemic killed between 50 and 130 million people. Charles’ sister-in-law and her twin babies died of the flu, and they were buried together, with one baby under each of her arms. Charles’ father was in the hospital after an operation at the time, and was sent home early so that the hospital could deal with the flu patients. After 3 weeks of suffering at home, he was sent back to the hospital, where he died. On January 12th, 1921, Charles and Myrtle were sealed in the Salt Lake Temple by Joseph Fielding Smith.

19: During World War I Charles and his family were living in Twin Falls and renting 80 acres to farm. Because of the war they could not get anyone to help, and Charles and Myrtle pulled, topped, and loaded 150 tons of beets on their own. The next year Charles came down with the Shingles during the time they were planting their corn. Myrtle did not think he would make it, and she had to do all the work with help from her sons. She shoveled a trench across 40 acres during that time in order to get water to the beets and beans. Charles lived though, and continued his hard work farming until he developed severe arthritis and could no longer use his hands for that kind of work. | 16 | Memories of Grandpa from Lynne’: "Charles was a hard worker that farmed his whole life. I have a nice, warm feeling when I think of him. When he retired I remember he and Grandma worked at the Bishop's storehouse, where people went to get food when they needed help. There were shopping carts and someone would hand Grandpa or Grandma a list and they would go get things off the shelf. I remember them cleaning the sugar factory business offices in Twin Falls. I would go with them to the offices at night, helping them clean. They lived in a little house on Quincy in Twin Falls. He had a nice garden in the back and I remember it had rutabaga in it and that some part of it was poisonous. Grandma would make rutabaga pie but I never tried it – it didn't sound nice to me. Then they had a flower garden, so there were always flowers around the house. Towards the end I remember his hands were somewhat crippled because of his rheumatoid arthritis. I remember when Grandma passed away, he was alone with her, and the phone was a rotary dial phone that he couldn't dial because of his hands. They said he went out front yelling for the neighbors to come help him." | Charles and Myrtle with Chad Shurtz

20: Born Aug. 28, 1895 in Riverton, Utah Died March 6, 1975 in Twin Falls, Idaho Married Nov. 20, 1913, in Ogden, Utah Sealed January 12, 1921 by Joseph Fielding Smith. Daughter of Alma Demarquis Silcock and Mariah Rishton Had 8 children, 6 lived to maturity. Dorothy Jean was their 7th child. Myrtle was known for her great talents in sewing, quilting, crocheting, and making dolls and pillows. She was known as being an extremely hard worker, working out in the fields with her husband and family, and a great singer, singing with the Singing Mothers. | Myrtle Maria Silcock Bingham | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | Memories from Roger and Lynne': They lived in a cute little house in Twin Falls, Idaho where Grandma always had a big Christmas Eve dinner every year with the family. She had big, beautiful eyes and was tall and stately. She had a beautiful singing voice and was such a hard worker. Whenever they went to see her she had a quilt up that she was working on. | 17 | Myrtle's grandfather, Alma Sr., was out looking for land to settle near Kamas, Utah when his friend's son accidentally set off his dad's pistol he was cleaning. Alma Sr. was holding his son in his arms, and had just transferred the baby, our great-great grandfather, over to his other arm before the pistol was shot. The bullet killed Alma Sr., but the baby was safe by mere moments. Whether it was luck, a prompting, or angels' intervention, hundreds of people were affected by that act, including us.

21: Myrtle and her husband, Charles, were hard workers and lived through hard times as he was trying to find work and they moved place to place. One time they stayed with Charles'’ brother in Weston, Idaho where they worked hard to make a living farming. All they could grow was hay for the horses which made for a hard life there. Myrtle and Charles and their baby, and Charles'’ brother and his wife and son slept in the same bed. “The six of them slept crossways in a bed, with their feet on chairs.” For something sweet they would boil sugar and water and eat that on bread or make a little pudding with rice. Grandma didn’'t like it there. | The summer of 1928 they planted grain, clover, and potatoes. Grandma helped in the fields stacking hay, chopping grain, topping beets, and picking potatoes. She would also sew the sacks to put the potatoes in. Just as they were about to cut the grain that fall, it started to rain so they went home. It turned into hail and hailed so hard it ruined most of their crops. They had to sell their turkeys to get a little money. Our Grandma Dorothy came that November and was a blessing to help during that hard time. | "I was going to Relief Society and had to take a chicken, so I asked my husband to get it for me. He forgot, and went over to John Simmons, our neighbors. It was getting late, so I went out, saw a chicken there, picked up a piece of shovel handle and thot I would kill it, so I did, but the shovel handle came back and hit me in the mouth and broke my front tooth off. It sure did hurt. So I had to have the rest of my tooth out. I was mad at my husband for not getting the chicken, but I cleaned and cooked it, went to Relief Society to quilt, and made it on time." | 18 | Marie, Myrtle, Charles, Cloteal, Dorothy, Woodrow, Charles, Deloy | Elma Bingham, Myrtle's 4th child, died tragically after drinking lye while they were at her parent's house. They rushed her to the doctor who was 8 miles away but the lye had harmed her brain and she died the next day. The next year, their 5th baby, Moriene Bingham died a week after birth, weighing only 2 lbs.

22: Frelen Shurtz | 19 | Born Aug. 13, 1896 in Escalante, Utah Died November 7, 1976 in Delta, Utah Married Stella Spencer on June 20, 1920, in Escalante, Utah Sealed Sept. 8, 1920 in Manti Temple Son of Peter Shurtz and Harriet Derinda Moody Had 9 children, including two sets of twins. 2 of their sons died as young adults, including Lane Shurtz who was their 2nd child. Frelen was known by his children for being a hard worker. He worked from sunup to sundown. He ate peanut butter and honey on biscuits every morning for breakfast. He was known by his grandchildren for his farm management skills. He was a great teacher, always teaching in the church and was a conversationalist. He and Grandma were rock hunters and loved to do lapidary and collect geodes that they cut in half for display. | Frelen grew up in Byron and Primrose Wyoming. When his family first moved there, there were no houses. They lived in a tent for a year while they built their home. Later, they decided to build across the river and lived in a tent for another year and a half while they built another home. The school that Frelen attended was across a river and his father would take him and his sister Blanche across the river on the back of his horse in the morning, and in the afternoons their dad would meet them and they'd go back over the river on horseback again. During the winter Frelen and his brothers would ice skate across the river to go to school. Frelen remembered a time when it was so cold that they had to wrap gunny sacks over their feet to keep them from freezing while they walked. | Frelen loved to read, especially his Western Magazine. In the wintertime, when Frelen's children were young they spent their evenings playing games. A favorite was Button Button (whose got the button). They played with a black button and loved to hide the button in his black hair or on his shoulder while he sat in his chair. He never even winced when the children were hiding or finding the button. He was so intent on his magazine. | Frelen and his brothers made stilts to walk around on. Eventually they got good enough that they didn't need any handles. One time, they walked through a man's field on their stilts. He began yelling at them and soon a lady came running after them. Frelen fell off his stilts and had a hard time getting them off, but did it in time to get away from the angry woman. | On his honeymoon

23: When Frelen was in his 50's, he was called to be in the bishopric of the Sugarville Ward. Frelen told the stake president that he couldn't be in the bishopric because he was not living the Word of Wisdom. The stake president told him, "That was yesterday." Frelen accepted the call, changed his life and was a blessing to many members of his ward, including his grandson, Roger. He was later called as the Bishop for much of Roger's childhood. | Back Row: Roger, Lillie Memmott, Frelen Front Row: Roxie and Isaac Losee (Eugene's parents), Stella Shurtz | Frelen's father was the president of the canal company in Wyoming. He had a barrel filled with dynamite that had gotten hard and asked Frelen to take it to a wash where nobody would bother it. Instead, Frelen dug a hole out of the middle of it and lit a match. He ran and got out of the way just in time to avoid the blast. | Frelen and Stella enjoyed having friends over to play games in the evenings. At 9 pm sharp, Frelen would stand up and go wind his alarm clock for the next day. That was the clue for everyone to go home. | 20 | Alden and Inga Mae Shurtz's wedding. To the right of Alden: Elden Shurtz, Stella and Frelen Shurtz, Lillie and Eugene Memmott | Digital image copyright 2004, Beckwith Family. All rights reserved.

24: Grandma only grew to be 5 feet 2 inches and 100 pounds, and even as a child, she was always really little. She grew up in Escalante as the only daughter with eight brothers. She learned to be a part of anything that went on “as long as it wasn’t bad”. She told her children stories of stealing chickens and having a chicken fry. Or of a time when the girls decided to wear pants. The boys saw them and chased them to try and take the pants off of them. They ran like crazy and ended up running into Old Man Barker’s house, a justice of the peace, and “scared him to death.” Grandma enjoyed school and went through the 8th grade. She even got an award for never missing a day of school. | Stella Isabelle Spencer Shurtz | Grandma and Grandpa first lived on a ranch in Cedar City where Grandma cooked 2 meals a day for 8-10 hired men plus their children. They moved to Sugarville where they added another set of twins to their family. Elden and Alden brought the total to 8 boys and one daughter, the same as she had had in her family growing up. | In the words of Alden Shurtz, “Mother was a workhorse.” Her lifetime of hard work had prepared her to be able to take care of her large family and the daily needs of nine children and a farm. She was an outstanding cook and baked a lot. She made 6 loaves of bread, two times a week, and homemade cheese twice a year. Every meal was a big meal. Breakfast consisted of fried ham, sausage or bacon and eggs, toast or hotcakes and oatmeal. She baked bread, pies, and cakes and after each meal she’d mop the floor. She raised a garden and canned hundreds of bottles of fruit and vegetables. She used to say how good it felt in the Fall when the cellar was full of the fruits and canned veggies. The family also raised 400 chickens and sold the eggs to Utah Poultry, who said that they were the best they had. | Born Feb. 19, 1898 in Escalante, Utah Died Sept. 18, 1983 in Delta, Utah Married Frelen Shurtz on June 20, 1920 Sealed Sept. 8, 1920 in Manti Temple Daughter of: Joseph Spencer and Mary Malinda Thompson Stella was known for the great meals she cooked, her beautiful rose garden and vegetable garden. She was a hard worker and her home was always very clean and tidy. She also crocheted beautiful doilies of all sizes. | 21

25: When her sons were overseas in the war, she made them each an angel food cake with strawberry drizzled on top. She put each cake in a box surrounded by popcorn and shipped it to them. Alden was much younger but asked if she would do it for him someday when he was in the army. When he grew up he did join the army and while he was deployed he got a big box from home. When he opened it, it was cake, surrounded by popcorn. He was so surprised! Although he had forgotten about it, she had not. His bunkmates said it was the best cake they had ever eaten. It was so delicious that Alden only got one piece. | Grandma had her share of heartache. During World War II, her three oldest sons, Guy, Lane and Cecil all served in the military overseas. It was hard for everyone when they received word that Guy was missing. When they learned that he had been killed, it was a really sad time in their home. Grandma later told that the day before they received word that Guy had been killed, she went to the front door and when she opened it, Guy was standing there. She said that his spirit looked just the same. A few years after the war, Cecil’s wife, Marie, died. Grandma's second son, Lane, died in a farming accident a few years after that. It was very hard on Grandma to have Guy, Marie and Lane all die so close together. They understood the gospel plan, so they had some comfort during those hard times, but it was still a hard time for Grandma and Grandpa. They had other children to take care of and they proved their resiliency in the way that they carried on for their family, even through their sorrow. | 22 | Roger's homecoming | On her honeymoon

26: Mother | Eugene Memmott | Born July 10, 1889, in Scipio, Utah Died July 20, 1964, in Salt Lake City, Utah Married to Lillie Ingaborg Jensen on December 5, 1923 in Manti Temple Son of James Ammon Memmott and Susan Agnes Ivie Had 10 children. June Losee was their 3rd child. Eugene was known for his garden and his kindness and his faithfulness in the Gospel. | Eugene grew up on a ranch not far from Scipio Lake. He was taught while very young to work – doing many odd jobs that could be done by a boy of his age. In 1916, Gene received a call to go on a mission to Texas and Missouri, which he had longed for for many years. | Memories of Dad (Eugene Memmott) by June M. Losee: As I recall the memories implanted in my mind. I think of Dad as loving and also very kind. As each new baby came along he'd love and care for us. Working hard from sun till sun, without any fuss. After work, outside again to do his gardening. Then we'd gather round the organ, to have home evening. We were a singing family, that didn't cost much money. We'd always joke and laugh a lot, we thought we were pretty funny. Sometimes to the ranch we'd go with the horses and the wagon, picking flowers along the way. Dad cooked then, and we did the braggin. Family prayers were a must every night and day. When anyone was hurt or sick, then we would fast and pray. Dad gave us special blessings so about the priesthood we did know. These miraculous healings helped our testimonies grow. We didn't have an excess of money, but together we learned to share. Learning the true meaning of life on earth and for others to always care. We were taught to pay our tithing with Mom's encouragement. And to the House of the Lord, when married, all nine of us children went. Yes, I'm thankful for the gospel and a father kind and true, who has given me so much in life, I say a special "Thank you". | 23

27: The memories of Eugene Memmott by his grandson, Roger Guy Shurtz: We went often to grandpa and grandma Memmott's home in Sugarville, Utah from the time I was young until I was an early teenager. They then moved to Salt Lake City. Grandpa grew a great and big garden, and in his old age spent most of his time tending it. Just past the garden was the 2 seater outhouse, which was in use much of my youth until the great day they put in an indoor bathroom with toilet, sink and tub. How wonderful it must have been for them! The outhouse was interesting though, with Sears and other similar sales catalogues used for toilet paper. I considered grandpa kind of quiet, but it may be because grandma was quite the talker. He was in the Sunday school presidency in the Sugarville ward and was always to church. He sometimes bore his testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel, and he always had a hug or hand shake for me before or after the meetings. He had some serious health issues, with sugar diabetes as thy used to call it, and it made him awfully sick. Grandpa died in 1964, the year between my junior and senior years in high school. | Lillie: “July 4th 1923, around 9 am a car drove into our yard. Gene had bought him a car. He hadn’t yet learned to drive, so he hired a young man from Scipio to drive for him. Up until this time he had come to see me on saddle horse or buggy. He brought the man into the house and also a bucket of fresh green peas he had picked out of his garden. He asked Lillie and her mother to go with him into Holden to the parade. When they got back, her mother cooked a delicious dinner including the green peas.” | “In the afternoon we all drove back to the races and ball games. Mother went with us by invitation of Gene. Mother and I were alone at that time because my dad had died. It came time to go to the dance at night. I really worried for fear Gene wouldn’t ask Mother to go along again. I knew she didn’t dare stay there in the Cedars at night. It was 11 miles from anyone. I had made up my mind for an excuse to stay home, but here came Gene and the driver volunteering to do our outside chores while we prepared supper. At the supper table, Gene said, ‘Sister Jensen, I hope you are not too tired to go watch us dance.’ Mother said, ‘not at all, if that is what you want.’ So we all went back to the dance. But I really admired Gene that evening for the way he treated my mother. He acted like the gentleman he truly is. He never once throughout the day or evening made her feel out of place. After the dance, he treated me to a banana split and then we drove home and they left for Scipio. Now my mother liked Gene as well as my father had.” | Lillie Ingaborg Jensen lived in Holden, Utah and first became interested in Gene in 1923 when she saw him out in the yard talking to her brothers, and he asked her out. He came to Holden a few weeks later and invited Lillie to go to stake conference with him in Scipio, Utah. She was very embarrassed when he came wearing his striped overalls under his suit coat. Her dad liked the guy and told her there were lots of things worse in a man, than dirty overalls under a suit. He said there were guys who had dirty souls under their skin that you couldn’t see, that was worse. So she believed him and continued to be seen with him at dances, shows, etc. But of course he never looked as bad as he did that one day. Boy! Did he ever need a wife to help him dress, and how. | 24 | Back Row: James Ammon Memmott, Eugene, Calvin, Susan Agnes Ivie Memmott Front Row: Agnes, Redick, Betty | Eugene and Lillie's children. June Losee is at the top left. | Eugene on the far left

28: Lillie Ingaborg Jensen | 25 | Born May 12, 1899 in Christianberg, Utah Died Jan 7, 1986 in Salt Lake City, Utah Married Eugene Memmott Dec 5, 1923 in Manti Temple Daughter of Jens Peter Jensen and Inga Lisa Johnanesson Lillie was known for being a great letter writer, and she loved to write poetry. She fulfilled all her callings in the church and faithfully attended the temple throughout the years. | Her brother William went down to the San Pitch river which ran back of their yard, and picked a large bouquet of water lilies and brought them to her mother, stating he wanted the new baby named Lillie after those water lilies and that is how she got her first name. Her mother took care of three Swedish girls on the ship to America. One was named Ingaborg. She was very good to mother and her mother told her if she ever got another girl, she would name her after her. That is how she got her middle name. | When she was five years old they moved to a small farm east of Gunnison, which she really liked. In the evening her mother would take the kids for a hike after the evening meal and as they walked along the flower lined road, she would sing about the Golden Rod. | In those days they held Danish meetings in the homes of the Danish people. Many Sunday mornings they met at their house for the Danish meetings, which she really enjoyed. She was able to understand what they said as her father and mother talked Danish in their home and taught it to the children. Mother would clean the children and dress them in their Sunday best to attend the Danish sacrament meeting. | In 1916 they moved to Holden, Utah and lived on a dry farm in the cedars, eleven miles north of Holden, called Church Springs. It was lonely there but she passed her time crocheting and reading. | Lillie and her brother Kimball

29: 26 | Lillie went to the Centerfield School, which was on the same lot as the church house. She went to religion class after school once a week and learned a lot. It was something like primary. They had one teacher to teach all the children, but she was really good and a very faithful teacher. Lillie and her mother joined the Centerfield choir. When she was 12 years old she attended Sunday school and sacrament meeting every Sunday and would bear her testimony many times. She always had a job in the church, whatever she was asked to do. Her mother taught her to be obedient. She wanted to go to the Celestial glory and thought by listening to our prophet’s voice and obeying what the Lord told us to do, as well as our parents, we may have a chance. | Lillie married Eugene Memmott of Scipio. After they were married, Eugene built a nice home for her in Oasis, Utah and they moved into it in March 1924. Over the years they lived in Oasis, Scipio and Sugarville, Utah. They had ten fine and faithful children together. Their names were Alice, Harold Eugene, June, Berdell “J”, Melvin Cleone, Cleathen Grant, Inga Mae, Veola, Lawrence Devon and Glenda Joyce. | Lillie gave a wonderful example of Gospel living and spent many years faithfully attending the temple. She kept a record of the number of names she had done, and before she died she did almost 100,000 names. She must have had quite the reception on the other side of the veil. She gave her grandchildren some wonderful advice: "Anyone who is faithful and prayerful will have God close to them and will receive divine help in all they do. Until we have prayed, we cannot do more than pray. After we have prayed, we can do more. Work as if everything depended upon you, and pray as if everything depended upon God. He only is exempt from failures who makes no efforts. There is only one real failure in life, that is possible, and that is to not be true to the best one knows. Be yourself and keep a laugh in your heart. Be as good as your friends think you are. Find joy in work. Win friends by being one. Be captain rather than victim of your moods. Waste neither time nor energy in worrying over troubles which may never come. Give your strength to the weak, sustain the poor. Give sympathy to the suffering and your heart to God." | Lillie back row, 2nd from right | Lillie bottom right

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Nicole Cragun
  • By: Nicole C.
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  • Title: Family History
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