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Letter to a Soldier

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Letter to a Soldier - Page Text Content

S: Letter to a Soldier - The Story of Floyd Schatz and Marlene Pope

BC: Given in Love and Gratitude for you both. Your strength and wisdom guided me and your love anchored me. Marcia

FC: Letter to a Soldier The Story of Floyd Schatz and Marlene Pope

1: A desire to share memories with his children, grandchildren, and their future children was the motivation behind this book. Tape recording began in January 2009. Papa loved every minute sharing stories of days gone by. The dimple we loved so much easily formed in his left cheek as he flipped through old photographs. When he saw one he wanted to use for this publication, he'd smile, raise an eyebrow and say, "Gee, I remember this picture." I turned on the recorder and the stories began. My parents were born during the great depression--an era of sacrifice and honor. Their parents taught them hard work by their own example--the value of a dollar, and the importance of buying only the things necessary to survive. They sacrificed personal satisfaction of pursuing an advanced education. There was no "find myself" time in their life. Instead, their focus was on family, oftentimes leaving school at an early age to provide financial support to their parents and younger siblings. This is the story of Floyd and Marlene Schatz--of their parents, and of those who came before them. It is for me, my sisters and our children, and the children yet to come. To enter a time gone by--the life of strangers to us, yet are very much a part of who we are. Family photographs dating back to the early 1800's will give you a glimpse of our heritage. The stories of Floyd Schatz as he bravely fought in Korea will warm your heart and bring a smile to your face. This book would not be complete without the beautiful story of a love destined to be. You will read how Marlene and Floyd met, fell in love, and started the generation you know today. | In Loving Memory | Marlene and Floyd Schatz

2: Mother - Ethel Lorena Willis Born 8/19/1891 Died 4/28/1984

3: Father - Charles Arthur Pope Born 11/11/1885 Died 10/7/1958

4: Descendants of Eli Kader Willis Marlene's Maternal Grandfather Generation 1 Eli Kader Willis was born June 27, 1855 in South Carolina, and died January 14, 1942 in Tennessee. He married Nancy Ann Witherington on December 24, 1885 in Tennessee. Children of Eli Willis and Nancy Witherington are: Ethel Lorena Willis, b. August 19, 1891, Tennessee; d. April 28, 1984, St. Charles, MO. Stephen Willis, b. September 23, 1888, Tennessee; d. October 28, 1909, Tennessee. Grace Willis, b. September 16, 1887, Rutherford, Tennessee; d. December 22, 1982, St. Charles, MO. Byron Willis, b. 1893, d. 1957 Generation 2 Ethel Lorena Willis married Charles Arthur Pope October 9, 1926 in Gibson County, Tennessee, son of James Pope and Mary Skelton. Children of Ethel Willis and Charles Pope are: Nannie Marlene Pope, b. April 5, 1934, St. Louis, MO Ruth Marie Pope, b. October 19, 1927, St. Louis, Mo. Grace Willis married Thomas Pope May 10, 1910 in Tennessee. Children of Grace Willis and Thomas Pope are: George Franklin Pope, b. August 12, 1912, Tennessee Willis Allen Pope, b. August 11, 1916 Avanell Pope, b. July 27, 1920, Tennessee Glen Thomas Pope, b. February 17, 1925

5: Generation 3 Nannie Marlene Pope married Floyd Ray Schatz June 19, 1954 in Northside Baptist Church in St. Louis, Mo, son of William Schatz and Alma Lett. Children of Nannie Pope and Floyd Schatz are: Karen Marie Schatz, b. March 29, 1957, St. Louis, Mo. Vicki Lynn Schatz, b. January 12, 1960, St. Louis, Mo. Marcia Gail Schatz, b. September 8, 1962, St. Louis, Mo. Ruth Marie Pope married Finis Earl Luttrell November 25, 1949 in Northside Baptist Church in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Ruth Pope and Finis Luttrell are: Nancy Jean Luttrell, b. November 28, 1950, St. Louis, Mo. Kenneth Ray Luttrell, b. January 4, 1953, St. Louis, Mo. Katheryn Sue Luttrell, b. January 4, 1953, St. Louis, Mo. Patricia Jo Luttrell, b. December 2, 1957, St. Louis, Mo. John Charles Luttrell, b. November 4, 1965, St. Louis, Mo. George Franklin Pope married Inez Lane December 5, 1931. Child of George Pope and Inez Lane is: Billy Thomas Pope, b. August 16, 1935. Nell Pope married Horace Ward march 11, 1935 in Tennessee. Child of Nell Pope and Horace Ward is: Shirley Ward, b. January 12, 1937.

6: Generation 4 of Descendants of Eli Willis Karen Marie Schatz married Donald Oreon Hilgert May 22, 1982 in Holy Cross Lutheran Church in St. Charles, Mo, son of Oreon Hilgert and Helen Luebbert. Notes for Donald Oreon Hilgert: Don was married to Linda Cooper on August 4, 1973. To this union was born Amy Alicia Hilgert on August 12, 1975. Children of Karen Schatz and Donald Hilgert are: Steven Ryan Hilgert, b. January 18, 1984 Shari Renee Hilgert, b. November 21, 1985 Vicki Lynn Schatz married Less Leslie Estes November 4, 1978 in First Baptist Church of St. Peters, Mo. Child of Vicki Schatz and James Estes is: Jennifer Lynn Estes, b. February 16, 1979. Marcia Gail Schatz married (1) Richard Allen Moore April 18, 1981 in First Baptist Church of St. Peters, Mo. She married (2) James Kevin Putnam December 29, 1990 in St. Louis Cathedral in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Marcia Schatz and Richard Moore are: Mark Allen Moore, b. January 15, 1983 Kyle Anthony Moore, b. January 8, 1988 Child of Marcia Schatz and James Kevin Putnam is: Kevin Joseph Putnam, b. April 23, 1996 Nancy Jean Luttrell married Orville Halcomb May 13, 1978 in Wright City Baptist Church in Wright City, Mo.

7: Kenneth Ray Luttrell married Carrol Anne Carl October 7, 1978 in Lexington, Mo. Children of Kenneth Ray Luttrell and Carrol Carl are: Dianne Michelle Luttrell, b. November 26, 1983 James Michael Luttrell, b. May 22, 1986 Katheryn Sue Luttrell married Hans Johann "Henry John Moore" Ratij September 14, 1974 in Wright City Baptist Church in Wright City, Mo. Child of Katheryn Sue Luttrell and Hanry Moore is: Jessica Ann Moore, b. November 4, 1977 Patricia Jo Luttrell married Glen Dixon October 12, 1992 in First Baptist Church of Kimberling City, Mo. Notes for Glen Dixon: Glen was married previously. To this union was born Jessica Dixon. DECENDANTS OF ARCHIBLE POPE Paternal Great Grandfather of Marlene Archibal Pope b. 11/30/1832; d. 5/17/1893. He was the son of Reddin and Nancy Pope from Johnston NC. He married Dorcas Porter (b.4/5/1838, d. 12/31/1912) in Gibson County Tennessee, March 20, 1856. In 1869 Archibal, Dorcas, and sons moved to Scott County Arkansas where in 1877 they acquired 80 acres of land apparently from the Homestead Act. He is listed in the 1870 Scott County Arkansas and 1880 Logan County Arkansas census records. Archibal is buried in Gibson County Tennessee. Child of Archibal Pope and Dorcas Porter is: James Marshal Pope, b. 1857, Tennessee; d. 1944, Rutherford, Tennessee.

8: Generation 2 of Descendants of Archible Pope James Marshal Pope married Mary J. Skelton in Tennessee, daughter of Sullivan Skelton. Mary J. Skelton died of Cerebral Hemorage and High Blood Pressure. Children of James Pope and Mary Skelton are: Charles Arthur Pope, b. November 11, 1885, Rutherford, Tennessee; d. October 7, 1958, St. Louis, Mo. Nannie Dee Pope, (date unknown). She married Alvin Brown Kerr. They had one child, Glenn Kerr. Generation 3 Charles Arthur Pope married (1) Flora Belle Patterson 1915 in Tennessee. He married (2) Ethel Lorena Willis October 9, 1926 in Gibson County, Tennessee, daughter of Eli Willis and Nancy Witherington. Children of Charles Pope and Flora Patterson are: Dorothy Lucille Pope, b. June 24, 1916, St. Louis, Mo., d. St. Louis, Mo James Thomas Pope, b. November 24, 1920., d. August 30, 2004 in Kimberling City, Mo. Children of Charles Pope and Ethel Willis are: Nannie Marlene Pope, b. April 5, 1934, St. Louis, Mo Ruth Marie Pope, b. October 19, 1927, St. Louis, Mo Generation 4 Nannie Marlene Pope married Floyd Ray Schatz June 19, 1954 in Northside Baptist Church in St. Louis, Mo, son of William Schatz and Alma Lett.

9: Children of Nannie Pope and Floyd Schatz are: Karen Marie Schatz, b. March 29, 1957, St. Charles, Mo. Vicki Lynn Schatz, b. January 12, 1960, St. Louis, Mo Marcia Gail Schatz, b. September 8, 1962, St. Louis, Mo Karen Marie Schatz married Donald Oreon Hilgert May 22, 1982 in Holy Cross Lutheran Church in St. Charles, Mo, son of Oreon Hilgert and Helen Luebbert. Notes for Donald Oreon Hilgert: Don was married to Linda Cooper on August 4, 1973. To this union was born Amy Alicia Hilgert on August 12, 1975. Children of Karen Schatz and Donald Hilgert are: Steven Ryan Hilgert, b. January 18, 1984 Shari Renee Hilgert, b. November 21, 1985 Vicki Lynn Schatz married Less Leslie Estes November 4, 1978 in First Baptist Church of St. Peters, Mo. Child of Vicki Schatz and James Estes is: Jennifer Lynn Estes, b. February 16, 1979. Marcia Gail Schatz married (1) Richard Allen Moore April 18, 1981 in First Baptist Church of St. Peters, MO. She married (2) James Kevin Putnam December 29, 1990 in St. Louis Cathedral in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Marcia Schatz and Richard Moore are: Mark Allen Moore, b. January 15, 1983 Kyle Anthony Moore, b. January 8, 1988 Child of Marcia Schatz and James Kevin Putnam is: Kevin Joseph Putnam, b. April 26, 1996

10: Generation 4 of Descendants of Archible Pope Ruth Marie Pope married Finis Earl Luttrell November 25, 1949 in Northside Baptist Church in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Ruth Pope and Finis Luttrell are: Nancy Jean Luttrell, b. November 28, 1950, St. Louis, Mo Kenneth Ray Luttrell, b. January 4, 1953, St. Louis, Mo Katheryn Sue Luttrell, b. January 4, 1953, St. Louis, Mo Patricia Jo Luttrell, b. December 2, 1957, St. Louis, Mo John Charles Luttrell, b. November 4, 1965, St. Louis, Mo. Nancy Jean Luttrell married Orville Halcomb May 13, 1978 in Wright City Baptist Church in Wright City, Mo. Kenneth Ray Luttrell married Carrol Anne Carl October 7, 1978 in Lexington, Mo. Children of Kenneth Ray Luttrell and Carrol Carl are: Dianne Michelle Luttrell, b. November 26, 1983 James Michael Luttrell, b. May 22, 1986 Katheryn Sue Luttrell married Hans Johann "Henry John Moore" Ratij September 14, 1974 in Wright City Baptist Church in Wright City, Mo. Child of Katheryn Sue Luttrell and Hanry Moore is: Jessica Ann Moore, b. November 4, 1977 Patricia Jo Luttrell married Glen Dixon October 12, 1992 in First Baptist Church of Kimberling City, Mo.

11: Above picture taken over 120 years ago. Marlene's Great-Grandparents (Archibal and Dorcas Pope) are seated. Marlene's grandparents (James Marshal and Mollie Pope) are standing in center top.

12: Marlene Pope Born - April 5, 1934 St. Louis, Missouri | Below is a picture Ethel's family. Ethel (Marlene's mom) is farthest left sitting on her dad's lap. Parents are Eli Willis and Nancy Witherington.

13: "I was born on April 5, 1934 in St. Louis. My parents are Ethel and Charles Pope. Mom was forty-two and Dad was forty-seven when I was born. I have one full sister, Ruth, born October 17, 1927, and two half-siblings, James and Dorthy. James was born November 24, 1920, and Dorothy was born on June 24, 1916. We were a close family although I didn't spend much time with Dorothy or James. Dorothy was already married when I was born and James was fourteen years older than me. Ruth was seven years old when I was born. "My parents were loving. We spent holidays with the Ward's--Aunt Nell, Uncle Horace, their daughter Shirley, and Aunt Nell's mom and dad, Grace and Tom Pope. Aunt Grace and Uncle Tom lived downstairs from us. Grace was my mom's only sister. Dad worked for WPA making 50 cents an hour. The WPA was a work program where people cleaned out ditch banks with a cycle. He used to do all kinds of work like that or anything else he could find. He later worked for the Mayfair Hotel in St. Louis. When I was in grade school I would sometimes walk to the streetcar with him then went back home when he got on. He then worked as a valet, pressing people's clothes. It was so hot in there on the top floor where he worked. I used to go up to visit him. I took the elevator to the top floor. There were African American women who ran the elevators and I always thought they were so pretty and they were so nice. Mom was a homemaker, but also worked at the cleaners when we lived on Bartmer. Dad's brother John L., and his wife, Dolly, owned a dry cleaner and we'd often visit them there. Mom was within walking distance of the cleaners so she didn't take the streetcar. I always walked to school. Since Ruth was so much older than me, Mom made her walk me home from school. One day I told mom, "I don't want Ruth to walk me to school. I can find my way home by myself." Well, I got lost. Thankfully Ruth wasn't far behind me and found me. Since Dorothy was already married, I didn't have much childhood with her. I remember when WW2 broke out in 1942, and James enlisted in the Army. I was six years old--he was twenty. As a kid, he rode his bicycle delivering telegrams. He wore this "telegram hat" while he worked. I remember one time while he was still in the service, Mom got a telegram and was so afraid something had happened to James. In those days people got telegrams when a loved one was killed in the war. She was so afraid to open the letter, but it turned out not to be bad news. I went to Dozier Elementary School in St. Louis, and graduated from Wellston High School also in the city of St. Louis. I had many girlfriends in high school. We'd go to basketball and football games, and often went to Forest Park. We took the streetcar. We'd go swimming at Heman Park since we could walk there. In those days you could get into the movie theater for a dime. I worked for Kreskie's Five and Dime and used the money I made to go to the movies. We'd go to Forest Park Highlands for picnics and take the double-decker bus. James moved to California after the war ended and I didn't see him much after that. He wasn't home when Dad got sick. Dad was diagnosed with throat cancer and died in 1958. I remember seeing him one time sitting on the side of the bed crying--this was right after he was diagnosed. It made me so sad and I will always remember his face. I always liked bookkeeping so I took a job as a clerk at Prudential Insurance after high school and stayed there until I retired."

14: (Top Left:) Marlene's 1/2 brother, James and father, Charles Pope (Top Right) Marlene's parents, Charles and Ethel Pope) Charles, Ethel, Ruth and Marlene (Bottom Left) Charles and Ethel (Bottom Right) Charles' parents and siblings. Far right is Nannie Dee--(Aunt) the woman Marlene was named after.

15: Pope family records in America date back to the early colonial period in the Virginia migration and continued into the Carolinas into Tennessee. In 1839, it appears that Barnabus Pope and family settled in Gibson County on the edge of the Obian River just outside Dyer, Tennessee. Archiblal Pope and family acquired 80 acres of land in 1877 under the Homestead Act. Ancestors served in Revolutionary and Civil War. They were captured and released at end of war.

16: Charles & Ethel Pope with Charles' Family | (Above) Charles Pope is seated second from left with father, James, and Mother, Mollie. Nannie D Pope (Kerr) far left. | (Below) Charles Pope holding Marlene | (L-R) Elsie, Nannie, John L., Charles, Mary w/Father, James Marshal Pope

17: (Top left) Ethel Pope at her mother's grave. She died when Ethel was 12 years old. Ethel's brother Stephen died when she was 18 after a two week illness. And brother Stephen in 1957 - one year before losing her husband to cancer. (Right) Ethel Pope and Charles Pope in Mexico. (Middle Left) James Pope, Charles' father. (Bottom Left) James Marshal & Eli Kader Willis

18: House on 1314 Evans, St. Louis, MO | Marlene playing in mud. | At 1312 N. Newstead, St. Louis | At 1312 N. Newstead St. Louis | At house on 5885 Bartmer, St. Louis, | Also on Bartmer St.

19: Easter on Suburban Street | Taken at 6162 Suburban, St. Louis | Photo taken on Admiral in St. Louis | Meramac Caverns | Lake Wappapello in Mo. | 6162 Suburban. Home 1949-1954

20: My Baby Book

23: (Top left) Marlene'Pope (Middle) James and Dorothy Pope (Bottom Left) James Pope with Father, Charles. (Right) James and Marlene Pope.

24: Top pictures of Marlene and sister, Ruth. Marlene with Ruth and parents, Charles and Ethel Pope. Bottom Right) Marlene with neighbor friend.

26: (Top Left) Marriage License of Charles Pope and Ethel Willis. (Top right) Marlene on Bartmer St. (Bottom) Marlene with Arminee, Shirley & James. Found Arminee a few years ago and met her for dinner.

28: School Days

30: Engagement

32: Book written by James' wife about his time in WW2

33: Gifts James sent back to the states.

35: Letters from James to Marlene. Military edits them before mailing.

36: (Top Left:) Ethel's mother's grave. Same one she was standing by in page 19. (Top Right) Ethel standing by grave of sister, Grace, in 1984. (Left Middle) Ethel at lake house. (Bottom Left) Johnny and Dolly. Johnny was only brother to Charles Pope. Owned a dry cleaners--visited often when I was little. (Bottom Right) Ethel with Grace at Schatz home on Bates Road in O'Fallon, MO.

37: Gravestone pictures taken by Marlene. She, Floyd, and Nell Ward traveled to Tennessee and South Carolina. Mollie Pope's maiden name was Skelton. Grave is thought to be of her brother. Bottom picture is of Eli Kader Willis home in Tennessee.

38: Descendants of Henry (Heinrich) G. Schatz Floyd's Great Grandfather Generation 1 Henry G. Schatz was born March 1858. He was a Wagon Maker in 1880 in Commerce Twp., Scott Co., Mo. He was a Blacksmith in 1900 in Village of Commerce, Commerce Co., Mo. The 1900 Scott Co., Mo Census shows that Henry Schatz' parents were born in Germany. He was married to Caroline (Lena) Sander on September 21, 1879 in Cape Girardeau Co., Mo. The 1900 Scott Co., Mo Census shows that Henry G. Schatz's wife, Caroline, had born 12 children and 9 were still living. Caroline (Lena) Sander was born September 16, 1858 and died February 14, 1947. Henry G. Schatz and Caroline Sander had the following children: Amelia Schatz was born January 17, 1879 in Scott Co. d, 10/10/1917. William Henry Schatz was born April 26, 1878 in Scott Co. d. 10/23/1952 Edward Schatz was born November 1882 in Scott Co., Mo. Nellie Schatz was born July 1889 in Scott Co., Mo. Edith A. Schatz was born September 26, 1891 in Scott Co., Mo d. 1/19/1983 John T. Schatz was born March 18, 1892 in Scott Co., Mo. D., 11/1978. Matthew Schatz; b. February 29, 1896 in Scott Co., Mo d., April 1981 in Mi. Irene Schatz; b. January 1898 in Scott Co., Mo. George G. Schatz; b., February 3, 1900 in Scott Co., Mo. d., June 1971 in Mi. Generation 2 Amelia Schatz was born January 17, 1879 in Scott Co., Mo. She died October 10, 1917 in Bollinger Co., Mo. She was buried on October 12, 1917 in Brush Creek Cemetery., Bollinger Co., Mo.

39: She was married to Mr. Barnett before June 1900 in Mo. William Henry Schatz was born April 26, 1878 in Commerce Twp., Scott Co., Mo. He was a Blacksmith in 1900 in Village of Commerce, Commerce Co., Mo. He died on October 23, 1952 in Oakland Co., Mi. He was buried on October 25, 1952 in Oakland Hills Cemetery, Oakland Co., Mi. He was married to Millie Neal Sanders (daugher of John Mack Sanders 1 and Mary Matilda (Mollie) Miller) July 13, 1902 in Scott Co., Mo. Marriage license issued July 12, 1902 by the Scott Co., Mo. Clerk's Office. Solemnized July 13, 1902 by John R. Gibbs. JP. Recorded in Marr. Book 7, page 348, on July 16, 1902. Millie Neal Sanders was born on October 7, 1879 in Commerce Twp., Scott Co., Mo. The 1880 Scott Co., Mo Census shows "Millie", 8 months old in June 1880 in the household of john and Mary Sanders. The 1900 Scott Co., Mo Census shows "Nellie N", age 20, single, born October 1879, in the household of John M. and Sarah M. Sanders. She died March 14, 1925 in Morley, Scott Co., Mo. She was buried March 16, 1925 in Oakdale Cemetery, Scott Co., Mo. William Henry Schatz and Millie Neal Sanders had the following children. Selestal Pearl Schatz b. June 1, 1903 in Vanduser, Mo. d. 9/26/1904. William Cline Bessie Marie Schatz John Henry Schatz Mary Jane (Mollie) Schatz born 9/1/1910 in Vanduser, Mo. d., 7/15/1929 Elizabeth (Bobbie) Schatz Alberta Schatz William Arnold (Bill) Schatz b. 10/5/1916 in Vanduser, Mo. d., 7/11/1966

40: Descendants of Henry (Heinrich) G. Schatz Floyd's Great Grandfather Generation 3 William Cline (Bill) Schatz married Alma Lillian Lett on August 3, 1926 in Scott Co., Mo. William Cline died August 19, 1975 in St. Louis, Mo. Alma Lillian Lett was born on June 21, 1908 in Scott Co., Mo. She died November 4, 1998 in Kimberling City, Mo. Alma Lett was the daughter of Benjamin Lett and Mary Murray. Children of William Schatz and Alma Lett are: Floyd Ray Schatz, b. November 3, 1930, Oran, Mo Anita Evelyn Schatz, b. June 9, 1927, St. Louis, Mo. d. March 21, 1997, Riverside Pavillion Nursing Home, St. Louis, Mo Wanda Lee Schatz, b., September 26, 1934, St. Louis, Mo d. Billy Gene Schatz, b., November 10, 1936, St. Louis, Mo d. Jerry Dwayne Schatz, b., August 3, 1949, St. Louis, MO., d. January 17, 1994, Portage Des Souix, Mo. Bessie Marie Schatz was born October 19, 1906 in Vanduser, Scott Co., Mo. She died April 2, 1996 in St. Louis, Mo. She was buried Aoril 5, 1996 in Lakewood Park Cemetery, St. Louis, Mo. She was married to Floyd David Hammon August 16, 1929 in Waterloo, Monroe Co., Il. She was divorced from Floyd David Hammon on January 20, 1956 in St. Louis Co., Mo. Floyd David Hammon was born May 1, 1905 in Kansas City, jackson Co., Mo. He died August 3, 1971 in Crawford Co., Mo. Bessie Marie Schatz and Floyd David Hammon had the following children: Children of Bessie Schatz and Floyd Hammon are: Garry Lee Hammon, b. April 2, 1932, St. Louis, Mo Roberta Hammon, b., December 25, 1935, St. Louis, Mo

41: Robert Starr Hammon, b., December 25, 1935, St. Louis, MO Generation 4 Floyd Ray Schatz married Nannie Marlene Pope June 19, 1954 in Northside Baptist Church in St. Louis, Mo., daughter of Charles Pope and Ethel Willis. Children of Floyd Schatz and Nannie Pope are: Karen Marie Schatz, b. March 29, 1957, St. Charles, Mo. Vicki Lynn Schatz, b. January 12, 1960, St. Louis, Mo Marcia Gail Schatz, b. September 8, 1962, St. Louis, Mo Anita Evelyn Schatz married Jack Fleschert July 6, 1947 in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Anita Schatz and Jack Fleschert are: John Joseph Fleschert, b. August 6, 1949, St. Louis, MO; d. August 9, 1949 Dennis John Fleschert, b. October 9, 1953, d. August 24, 1998 Daniel James Fleschert, b. September 15, 1956, d. January 31, 1993 Wanda Lee Schatz married Floyd Church June 2, 1951 in Northside Baptist Church in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Wanda Schatz and Floyd Church are: Paul Raymond Church, b. February 15, 1954, Jacksonville, FL John Joseph Curch, b. April 13, 1960, St. Louis, Mo Michael Leroy Church, b., February 1962; d. February 1962 Charles Michael Church, b. August 21, 1965, St. Louis, d. Billy Gene Schatz married Della Faye Glore October 19, 1943 in Mississippi. Children of Billy Schatz and Della Glore are:

42: Descendants of Henry (Heinrich) G. Schatz Floyd's Great Grandfather Generation 4 cont. Brenda Faye Schatz, b. July 31, 1954, St. Louis, Mo. Doborah Ann Schatz, b. July 26, 1957, St. Louis, Mo. Bobbie Michelle Schatz, b. November 17, 1962, St. Louis, Mo. Garry Lee Hammon married Janice Lynn Beeson June 26, 1955 in Lockhart, Caldwell Co., Texas. She was the daughter of Horace Jr. and Nova Kolb. Children of Garry Hammon and Janice Beeson are: Cheryl Lynn Hammon, b. July 2, 1956, St. Louis, Mo. David Lee Hammon, b. June 7, 1960, Galveston, Tx. Holly Jean Hammon, b. December 3, 1962, Galveston, Tx. Generation 5 Karen Marie Schatz (Floyd Ray Schatz and Nannie Marlene Pope) married Donald Oreon Hilgert May 22, 1982 in Holy Cross Lutheran Church in St. Charles, Mo, son of Oreon Hilgert and Helen Luebbert. Notes for Donald Oreon Hilgert: Don was married to Linda Cooper on August 4, 1973. To this union was born Amy Alicia Hilgert on August 12, 1975. Children of Karen Schatz and Donald Hilgert are: Steven Ryan Hilgert, b. January 18, 1984 Shari Renee Hilgert, b. November 21, 1985

43: Vicki Lynn Schatz (Floyd Ray Schatz and Nannie Marlene Pope) married Les Leslie Estes November 4, 1978 in First Baptist Church of St. Peters, Mo. Child of Vicki Schatz and James Estes is: Jennifer Lynn Estes, b. February 16, 1979. Marcia Gail Schatz (Floyd Ray Schatz and Nannie Marlene Pope) married (1) Richard Allen Moore April 18, 1981 in First Baptist Church of St. Peters, MO. She married (2) James Kevin Putnam December 29, 1990 in St. Louis Cathedral in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Marcia Schatz and Richard Moore are: Mark Allen Moore, b. January 15, 1983 Kyle Anthony Moore, b. January 8, 1988 Child of Marcia Schatz and James Kevin Putnam is: Kevin Joseph Putnam, b. April 26, 1996 Daniel James Flechert (Anita Schatz and Jack Fleschert) married Tamara Ellis March 1980 in St. Charles, Mo. Children of Daniel Fleschert and Tamara Ellis are: ' Amanda Marie Fleschert b. August 21, 1980 in St. Charles, Mo. Megan Marie Fleschert b. July 16, 1982 in St. Charles, Mo. Notes for Amanda and Megan Fleschert: After the death of Daniel and Tamara Fleschert, parents of Amanda and Megan, they were adopted by Robert and Barbara Burton and moved to Kimberling City, Mo. Paul Raymond Church (Wanda Schatz and Floyd Church) married Cathy Helgenbert in St. Louis, Mo.

44: Descendants of Henry (Heinrich) G. Schatz Floyd's Great Grandfather Generation 5 cont. Children of Paul Church and Cathy Helgenbert are: Sarah Grace Church, b. June 13, 1983, St. Louis, Mo. Jensen Allen Church, b. November 11, 1984, St. Louis, Mo. Caleb Michael Church, b. May 23, 1986, St. Louis, Mo. Rachael Abigail Church, b. December 5, 1989, St. Louis, Mo. John Joseph Church (Wanda Schatz and Floyd Church) married Debbie Larriere June 21, 1980 in St. Louis, Mo. Children of John Church and Debbe Larriere are: Miranda Spring Church, b. August 31, 1983, St. Louis, Mo. Jedidiah Harley Church, b. February 11, 1987, St. Louis, Mo. Charles Michael Church (Wanda Schatz and Floyd Church) married Colleen Jane Bunnel June 27, 1984 in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Michael Church and Colleen Bunnel are: Michael Steven Church, b. July 18, 1984, St. Louis, Mo. John Richard Church, b. October 29, 1991, St. Louis, Mo. d. April 15, 2010 Brenda Faye Schatz (Billy Gene Schatz and Della Glore) married Arthur Walter Steinbruegge December 9, 1972, St. Louis, Mo. Children of Brenda Schatz and Arthur Steinbruegge are:

45: Melissa Ann Steinbruegge, b. October 12, 1975 Briana Dawn Steinbruegge, b. March 12, 1981 Danielle Renee Steinbruegge, b. June 12, 1984 Jessica Ruth Steinbruegge, b. September 24, 1985, d. September 1985 Andrea Michelle Steinbruegge, b. September 29, 1987 Corie Elizabeth Steinbruegge, b. August 22, 1980 Bobbie Schatz and Deborah Schatz married and had children but no records are listed in genealogy. Robert Starr Hammon (Gen. 4)) (Bessie Schatz and Floyd Hammon) married Sharon Hilgeman March 13, 1955 in St. Louis, Mo. Children of Robert Hammon and Sharon Hilgeman are: Brian Starr Hammon, b. October 14, 1968, St. Louis, Mo Barry Lee Hammon, b. October 11, 1970, St. Louis, Mo Brian Starr Hammon married Jeanette Ferguson. Child of Brian Hammon and Jeanette Ferguson is: Nathan Starr Hammon, b. October 11, 1997. No record if Barry is married or has children.

46: Mother - Alma Lillian Lett Born 8/3/1926 Died 11/4/1998

47: Father - William Cline Schatz Born 2/8/1905 Died 8/19/1975

48: (Top) Cline's family. He has hands on head. John and Molly Sanders with son, Mack Henry Floyd's Maternal Grandparents (Left) Charles Lett, Brother of Floyd's Mother (Below Right) Parents of Alma Schatz (Below) John & Molly (50 yr Anniversary--The Fiddler)

49: Emilie Sanders (Sister of Henry George) Henry George Schatz, (Floyd's Great Grandfather) Millie Sanders (Schatz) (Floyd's Grandmother) (Bottom) Siblings of William Henry Schatz (Floyd's Paterna Grandfather) William Henry is far right.

51: (Opposite Page) John and Molly Sanders (Fiddler) are parents of Millie Sanders (p. 49 top right) who married William Henry Schatz. Middle picture is with Cline and Alma Schatz. The Sanders are buried in Morley, Missouri. (This Page far right) is Alma Schatz and her brother Charles. (Right) Same children with their parents (Floyd's Maternal Grandparents. With them is Aleeta Lett.

52: Births were not always recorded at the time of birth . . . (Left) is an application to record the birth of Floyd's father, William Cline Schatz. (Right) Marriage License of Cline Schatz and Alma Lett.

54: (Top) Floyd with his mother. (Middle) With Anita and Wanda. Gravesite below.

55: Floyd hunting with his dad. | Cline with friends. | William Henry Schatz

56: (Top left) Floyd and his sister Anita. (Middle left) Floyd sister, Anita. (Bottom left) A Schatz family picture. Floyd, with siblings, Wanda, Anita, Jerry; and brother-in-law, Jack (Anita's husband). Also pictured are Floyd's parents, Cline and Alma. She made fantastic dumplings from scratch. (Bottom Right) Family picture with John and Molly Sanders top left with their daughter, Millie in the middle.

57: (Top right) This is a picture of Floyd's brother, Jerry--died at 44 of heart attack. (Middle right) A young picture of Wanda, Floyd's sister) (Bottom right) A later picture of Bill and Alma Schatz taken at an anniversary party held at the home of Marlene and Floyd Schatz in O'Fallon, Mo. (Opposite page article) Death of Alma's brother at 44 yrs old. (Right article) Death of Cline's brother also at 44 yrs old. Both killed in car crash. Floyd's brother was 45 yrs old when he died of a heart attack.

58: Floyd Ray Schatz Born November 3, 1930 | (Bottom right) This is a picture of Floyd's father's siblings and parents. Bill (Floyd's dad) is the one with his hands on his head.

59: Transcribed from January 2009 tape interview. "I was born on November 3, 1930 in Morley, Missouri. My parents are Alma and Cline Schatz. I had four siblings; Anita, born June 9, 1927; Wanda, born September 27, 1934, Bill, born November 10, 1936, and Jerry, born August 3, 1949. I am the last survivor of my family. . There was little money in my family growing up, but that didn't matter, we were happy and often pulled pranks on each other. Me and Dad were more like companions than Father/son, but he still held the role of disciplinarian. He took me hunting and fishing. I used to pick cotton when I was little. My sisters didn't though. I made a dollar or so working all day. I was about eight or ten and would drag a cotton sack in Morely, Missouri. The cotton was low to the ground.. I was short and could get the cotton faster than Dad. He sharecropped for a living. A neighbor had some ground on this place called Big Island which was surrounded by water. They had a lot of corn. This guy bought me a bunch of firecrackers to scare the ducks and the geese out of the corn because they were eating it. You had to shuck the corn by hand with a team of mules. I came behind it and helped pick up what fell off and put it back in the wagon. You'd work all day for only a dollar. Mom was a homemaker but she would help too. We all helped in the fields. We also had peanuts, corn, and cotton. We'd chopped the cotton and clean out the weeds. Dad used to coon hunt a lot. One day we found a nest of coons in a tree--somebody shot the mother of the coons. Somebody got a ladder and climbed up there to get the babies and we brought one home. We raised it as a pet and fed it from a bottle. Mom used to put blackberry jelly in those old pint jars. Back then we didn't have lids, so she'd put a cloth around the top and fasten it with a band. This coon got in there one day. Back then there wasn't much storage so she put them under the bed. She was so mad at that coon for getting into her jelly. My brother, Bill, was still on a baby bottle, and sometimes the coon would get his bottle because he was raised on one too. One day somebody raised cane for us having the coon, and the authorities came and took it away. They claimed it was against the law, and they came and got it. I think if Dad ever saw the guy in the woods, he would have killed him. Dad was pretty hot headed. I guess they let it loose out in the wild. It was only about a year old. We also had a squirrel we kept in a cage. He was mean and tore the wire off the cage and got away. The coon was good though--he never bit anyone and the girls were not afraid of him. We had coon dogs but they never bothered our pet coon. When I was a kid in Morely, they had movies down at the ballpark. Nita and I would walk there and watch the movie. You'd just sit on the grass. One night I was wearing a pair of corduroy pants. On the walk home after the movie, my pants were swishing and we didn't know what the sound was. We both got scared and ran the rest of the way home. We used to see Tarzan of the Apes and all kinds of movies. We'd go once a week. It was all outdoors and it was free. We didn't have any theaters around. We used to raise watermelon and cantaloupe. I remember we used to take them up to the train depot and tried to sell them for a penny a piece, but couldn't sell them. We'd throw them to the hogs. Nobody had any money back in those days. After serving in Korea, I went to work for the State of Missouri, Missouri Air National Guard, as a carpenter and stayed there until I retired.

60: Floyd - so adorable in this picture with the dimple we all loved visible even from an early age. The "dimple" was actually caused by a bicycle accident when he was really little.

61: I also remember a time when I was a kid, about eight years old. On Halloween night, a big thing back in those days was to turn over the outhouses. A bunch of the older boys took one of the outhouses and hoisted it on top of the drugstore and sat it up there. About a year after that people got wise and came up with what they called government toilets and they had concrete floors in them so we couldn't turn them over. When WW2 broke out work, was really hard to come by so Dad moved us to St. Louis, and went to work at the Torpedo Plant off Broadway when I was twelve years old. I went to school at Lowell Elementary, then to Rankin Tech School. Dad worked at the Torpedo Plant until the war ended, then went to work for Dirkmeyer Hardware in St. Louis. I think he went to work for Hussman after that. He worked in the machine shop for Hussman, then went to work for McDonell Douglas as a machinist and retired with them when he was 64. We lived at Grand and Blair in St. Louis. Dad was acquainted with a guy who had a place in Portage, Missouri. We used to work on his cabin. We'd go fishing with him and used to go out there quite a bit. We had fishing trips a lot down at Clearwater Lake. We had a big tent that I guess we bought from the boy scouts. Nita went with us, but Wanda didn't go. Jack, Nita's husband, went too. I was about seventeen when we went there fishing. Dad often took people who couldn't make a living in Southeast Missouri into our home in St. Louis until they could find work. I got my driver's license at sixteen. My first car was a 1931 Studebaker. I thought I knew more than my teachers so I quit school and went to work for Dirkmeyer--same as Dad. I learned a lot from working there. I worked there for a year or two, part time and also worked with a guy remodeling houses in St. Louis. It got so dirty and dusty from all the coal around, and finally told the guy, "If this is all there is to carpentry work, I quit." I went to work full time at Dirkmeyer Hardware store for one or two years. I was about sixteen years old then went to work for Hussman when I was eighteen. I left for the army two years later at twenty years old. Just before I enlisted, my mom had another son--my brother, Jerry. He was just a baby when I left for the war. I was twenty years old when I went into the army, and twenty-one when I got to Korea. I enlisted in February 1951. I went straight to Washington State for Basic Training. I was there about a year and shipped out to Korea in February 1952. I was there for thirteen months. I enlisted in the army for three years. When I got to Korea I was in an artillery unit. I was put into the 155 Field Artillery Unit in Korea. When I was in basic training I had three choices of where I could go and train. I wanted to go into combat engine as an operator. We had to go through classes on the "booby" traps and how to dismantle them. During the training the instructors would wire up our chairs and it would sound like a firecracker when they went off. It would shake us up a bit. We'd jump out of our chairs when they went off. Then we had to train in a field that resembled a mine field. They'd use mouse traps, and you'd have to put this pin in. We'd find it and there would be another one underneath it.

62: I soon found out I didn't want to be in this unit. I didn't want to blow myself up. One day they asked for volunteers for a guard outfit in the field artillery and I decided I wanted to be in that unit instead. I had to go through basic training again so I went through it twice. I was in the service battery. I ran the ration breakdown. I ran seventeen mess halls supplied with food. This was while I was in Washington State. Then I got called up to go to Korea. I went fifty miles to catch the boat for Korea. This was in 1952 in February that I left overseas. | Below is an article posted about the original Air National Guard Unit from Arkansas deployed to Korea. I replaced these men a year later in 1952. . | 1951: The national Guard deploys to Korea and encounters a new kind of warfare. Wyoming National Guardsman William W. Day IV described his first day of combat in Korea like many other soldiers might have experienced--a feverish race to ward off a Chinese Army onslaught. "The guns are hot and ammo can't be uncrated fast enough.l The motor pool is using every truck to haul ammo. The cooks, clerks and everyone available are preparing ammo while the gun crews stay at their posts and continue to pour a withering fire on the enemy," Day wrote in, The Running Wound: A Personal Memory of the Korean War. Day was a member of the 300th Armored Field Artillery Battalion. The Chinese are now within 800-700 yards and as our shells land among them, arms, legs rifles and equipment fly in every direction. It's a human wave." Day's description is similar to what many Guardsmen arriving in early 1951 to the war zone experienced. In most cases. they were quickly rushed to the front to help stem the Communist Chinese assaults. China's involvement in the conflict was another in a series of stunning developments in the war's formative months. The first was communist North Korea's surprise invasion of democratic South Korea June 25, 1950. North Korean troops quickly took Seoul, South Korea's capital, and nearly drove undermanned U.S. and South Korean forces off the peninsula. In response, President Harry S. Truman dispatched U.S. soldiers from Japan and mobilized the Guard. He also sought and received help from the United Nations Security Council, which for the first time asked member nations to provide troops.

63: Things were still perilous on September 15, 1950, when Gen. Douglas MacArthur, then head of the U.N. Command, sent U.S. forces ashore at Inchon, midway up the Korean peninsula near Seoul. The landings surprised and flanked the North Korean forces, cutting their supply lines, forcing them to withdraw in disarray. U.S. and U.N. forces then drove the enemy not only out of South Korea, but also within eighteen miles of North Korea's border with China. The conflict appeared to coming to a quick conclusion and the National Guard would not be needed. Then, much to the surprise of U.S. intelligence, thousands of seemingly fearless Chinese troops, entered the fray. As the first Guard units arrived in Korea, U.S. and U.N. forces were reeling back over the old border between northern and southern Korea under the weight of the massive Chinese offensive. Communist forces captured Seoul again. The U.N. lines stabilized just south of the city, despite numerous Chinese attacks. In January 1951, seven Army Guard units, all transportation outfits, arrived in Korea. As soon as their equipment arrived in Pusan at the southern tip of the Korean peninsula, truckers were dispatched to carry supplies and personnel up to the front lines, often coming under direct attack. They later carried wounded troops back to field hospitals. During the next month, Guard field artillery and other combat support units arrived, a welcome reinforcement to the hard-pressed U.N. armies. They included nine artillery battalions armed with towed 155mm howitzers, tracked M-7 "Priest" mounting 105mm howitzers and self-propelled "Long Tom's" with 155mm tubes. In March, as the Chinese began a new offensive, all nine battalions were heavily engaged in the fighting. Nine other Guard units arrived in February, eight of which were engineers, consisting of combat, construction and bridge units. The 32nd Quartermaster Group Headquarters Company from Pennsylvania was the last unit to arrive in February. By the end of the month, twenty-five of the total of forty-three Army Guard units to serve in Korea were in place. And by year's end thirty-eight units, including elements of the 45t6h Infantry Division from Oklahoma, were involved in combat operations. During 1952 five more units, including California's 40th Infantry Division, completed the Army Guard contribution. Among the artillery battalions arriving in February were two from Arkansas, the 936th and 937th, which fought in Europe during World War II. They would end up earning seven additional campaign streamers in Korea. The 936th, assigned to the I Corps, was armed with towed 155mm howitzers while the 937th,m assigned to the IX Corps, employed "long Toms." The 936th was the first Army Guard unit to actually engage the enemy, entering combat in early March. Both remained on active duty until the armistice in July 1953.

64: After the war their lineages were consolidated into the 142nd Field Artillery, which added two more streamers for actions in the Persian Gulf War. Tennessee's 196th Field Artillery Battalion, with towed 155mm howitzers, was assigned to the X Corps on the eastern sector of the front. In one week, the battalion fired more than 9,000 rounds helping to break up North Korean attacks against South Korean units and the American 7th Infantry Division. In May, the 196th was first attached to the 2nd and then 3rd Infantry divisions, firing 23,329 rounds during the month. The unit ended up being the most decorated Guard unit in the conflict, receiving two Presidential Unit Citations, one Army and two Navy (for support of Marine Corps units) commendations plus two Korean Presidential Unit Citations. END OF ARTICLE | (Left) This is one of the mess halls I took care of. I had privileges to eat in any of them. | (Left) This is a picture from basic training in Washington. This is one of the jeeps there.

65: The Korean War | 1950 - 1953

66: (Top right) This picture was taken after I got in Korea. I'm standing in front of a large combat truck. The other two pictures are with buddies from basic training in Washington state.

67: (Middle) This is the gun I was on in Korea, a 155 Howitzer gun. It shoots ninety-five pound projectiles. I ran all aspects of the gun. We all had to train on each section.l I'd set the coordinates and elevation of where to shoot. Sometimes we'd just go out and fire two or three rounds. The gun was set lower down, so we'd have to crank the elevation up to hit the line. We were only a half mile from the front line. There was a hole dug behind the gun, and we'd have to crank the barrel up so we wouldn't hit the dirt. (Far right) This is a picture of my girl back home. | (Below left) Taken in Seoul. Seoul changed hands several times before I got there. I was up around the 38th parallel line. I got to go back there one time for a two-day rest and relaxation, then went back for another couple two-day trips another time. I'm wearing a Class B uniform, with a field jacket.

68: (Middle) This picture was taken in Korea. I'm holding a swagger stick. A lot of guys hold this type of stick as a pointer if they're training. I just liked to carry one. (Right) This is a picture of our lieutenant with the B Battery flag, which was the battery I was in. It was the 936th Field Artillery flag. Each artillery unit had a different flag. | (Left) This was up on the line. We kept fuses and powder bags for the projectile. There's a fuse that loads onto the front landing tray. They can shoot nine miles. You adjust the bags according to how far you want to shoot, then pull the lanyard which fires the gun. We had a tank there with water and a swab. We were supposed to swab the tank after each round to cool it off. A few times we fired so fast we didn't have time to swab it. We just got the door slammed and it went off without even putting the fuse in. It was so hot it went off by itself.

69: (Top left) This is in Korea. The guy with me in this picture is who I used to deer hunt with. We used our Carebines to hunt with. A Carebine is a type of gun. It's a semi-automatic. I had an M1 in basic training which is what they had in WWII, but I didn't use them in Korea. The artillery people got the Carebines. They are a smaller gun than the M1. They hold a fifteen round clip. I had two clips taped together which gave me thirty rounds. We went deer hunting a few different times. This guy shot a deer that looked like a faun, but it was a full size deer. They are smaller in Korea--it probably only weighed 50 pounds. The people who worked in the mess hall cooked the deer we shot. One time we pheasant hunted--we only had one shotgun, a Browning. It had nine pellets. One guy and I jumped over a bob-wire fence. We were fifty feet in when I realized Korea didn't have fences. We'd just jumped into a mine field. We turned around and tried to back-step in our footsteps to get out of there. The mess hall cooked the pheasant for everyone too. | (Bottom left) This is our headquarter tent. Baker was the name of our company--Battery B. This was our CP. We slept in tents like this. We got hit with mortars and artillery rounds a few times, so they decided they'd take these tents and bring in a caterpillar and dig pits and put the tent inside, but I decided it wasn't a good idea, saying "If we put this tent in the hole and we get hit, the bullets will just ricochet around the tent." Digging the hole wasn't such a good idea.

70: (Left) These are two Australian guys I used to pal around with. They fought on the front lines and we fired support for them. These guys used to come down and drink beer with us. One time we got pretty drunk. One guy wanted to get some beer so we walked up to the front lines to get some from the other service people. We'd get a 5th of whiskey a month and a case of beer. I never drake the whiskey--I'd sell mine at the front line for twenty dollars. I never drank a lot of beer either until I got to Korea. One day we found a spring that opened up cold water, so we took it and we had these canisters that I think fuses came in. We punched holes in the bottom of it and got these hollow poles and took a section of one of them and punched it into the spring and the water came out into the containers that kept the beer cold. In the winter time, we got Japanese beer in bottles. Most of it was American beer, but the Japanese beer was a little more potent. It would freeze in the winter time and we'd put it around the pot belly stove. Every once in a while the beer would get too close to the stove and blow up. | (Right) This is where we'd stay most of the time. This is the hat I got from the Australian buddy. I have my forty-five on and I'm holding a cue stick I bought in Japan. Some guy talked me out of it and said I could get another one when I got to Japan to rotate home. But when I rotated home, I didn't have the chance to get another one.

71: (Left) This is a honey wagon in Seoul filled with poop. They'd take it to the rice fields and catch the poop in tanks underneath houses which caught it from a hole in the floor of the house. When the honey wagon got to the rice fields the workers would put this a-frame across their shoulders, and put a bucket on each side. One side had rice and the other side had poop. They'd take a handful of poop and a handful of rice and put it in the ground. That's why I wouldn't eat rice for a long time. They used this to fertilize the rice. | (Right) Another picture of a honey wagon truck in Seoul. This is just a small boy I saw and took his picture. I got a three day pass to go back there. We stayed at a hotel that hadn't been blown up. Half of Seoul was torn up because they changed hands so many times between North Korea and us. We'd take it, then they'd come and take it back. I think it switched hands about nine times.

72: (Top left) This is the artillery gun I was on and this is our crew. The crew chief is second from the right. They got here about a month before me. This is the 936 Field Artillery, the National Guard team from Arkansas. They replaced the original group from Arkansas. (Bottom left) This is me standing by one of the tents we slept in. | (Top) This is the half tracks that pull the guns. If you want to turn it you'd pull one side or the other side and it moves the artillery guns to another location.

73: These are pictures of our tents. We got hit with mortar and it blew holes in everything. We'd go to our bunkers for safety. You couldn't hear the mortars coming in, but you could hear the field artillery and would have more time to get to jump to cover. They'd whistle and you'd know they were coming in. Mortars killed a lot of people.

74: Discharge and Recognition Letters

78: Finally home to begin their new life together.

79: The year is 1953. Months of written correspondence from St. Louis, Missouri to Seoul, Korea led to this moment. Nineteen year old Marlene Pope sat in her living room waiting to meet twenty-three year old Floyd Schatz--the man she knew only by mail. Marlene's friend, and Floyd's sister, Wanda, asked Marlene if she'd consider writing her brother who was stationed in Korea. She agreed and soon wrote the first of many letters. Marlene explained to Floyd who she was and that Wanda had asked her to write. Floyd was surprised to get a letter from a woman back home, especially one he hadn't known before. They wrote one another twice a month. It was harder for Floyd to write--being in the midst of war held greater priorities for him. But he knew after the first few letters from Marlene that she was someone he wanted to get to know better. She had dated before, but Floyd had not. He sealed his letters with the initials, "T'.S.T.S.A." Marlene had no idea what this meant and learned at their first meeting that the initials stood for "to sweet to sleep alone." So, for all the young men out there--this is called romance. Marlene heard that Floyd was due for a thirty-day leave from Korea. She checked the newspapers daily to see when his unit would arrive home. Anita Schatz, Floyd's older sister, called Marlene to tell her Floyd was home and asked if she was ready to meet him. Well, of course Marlene couldn't wait to see if he looked like the pictures she'd seen of him. Months before, each sent their portrait to the other. In fact, they each went to a special photographer to dress up their picture--nothing but the best for their "pen pals." Floyd kept the picture of Marlene on his bed in Korea--dreaming of the day they'd finally meat. Marlene sat in Anita's living room waiting for Floyd's to arrive. For her, it was love at first site. She thought Floyd was so attractive in his military uniform. He came prepared to meet her with a necklace and earrings, and something Marlene hadn't suspected--a proposal of marriage on November 12, 1953. She quickly accepted and Floyd took a big sigh of relief. But the real task was asking Marlene's father, Charles, for his daughter's hand. After proving himself to be a worthy suitor, Charles' gave Floyd his blessing to marry his youngest daughter. The world could have fallen apart and these two wouldn't have noticed. They were finally together. Floyd had his first and last girlfriend and Marlene had the cutest guy in St. Louis. Their thirty-day courtship ended much too soon as Floyd had to return to Washington, then back to Korea. His military discharge came in February 1954, and the long distance relationship ended. They sealed their love in matrimony on June 19, 1954 in Northside Baptist Church.

80: Wedding of Marlene Pope and Floyd Schatz Joan Ellis - Matron of Honor Shirley Ward - Bridesmaid Jack Fleschert - Best Man Jerry Holland - Groomsman Ring Bearer - Jerry Schatz Flower Girl - Jeanne Luttrell

81: Taken from Wedding Memory Book Joan Ellis and Shirley Ward gave me a wedding shower at 5932 Bartmer Street in St. Louis, Mo. The day of my wedding, Floyd and I picked up the candelabras and candle sticks early Saturday morning. We helped decorate the church and Mom and Ruth decorated the basement. Saturday afternoon, Betty manicured my nails. I started getting ready for the church about 6:15. James and Betty picked us up around 7:45. Floyd and I went to Lake of the Ozarks for our honeymoon. We stayed at the Parkview Resort, which is about 30 miles from Bagnel Dam. On Monday, June 21, we went to see "The Bridal Cane." It wasn't very big but it was very pretty. Went into Camdenton, Missouri and bought some groceries. Tuesday, June 22, we went down to the lake and did some fishing. We caught about four small ones. Threw all the others back. Wednesday, June 23, we rented a boat and went across the lake. Tried fishing some more, but had no luck. That evening we went into Camdenton and went to a show. Thursday, June 24, we went to the lake. I got a fairly good suntan. We met some very nice people Thursday night. They were from Illinois. Friday, June 25, we started home about 12:30 and arrived at Mom's around 5:30. We had a wonderful time.

82: On This Day In History Monday, November 3, 1930 Birth Day of Floyd Schatz Top Songs for 1930 Mysterious Mose by Walter Doyle I Got Rhythm by Ira Gershwin Happy Feet by Jack Yellen Get Happy by Harold Arlen 1930 Prices Bread: $.08/loaf Mile: $0.56/gal Eggs: $0.49/doz Car: $525.00 Gas: $0.25/gal House: $7,146 Stamp: $0.02/each Avg Income: $1,612/yr Hot New Toys Chinese Checkers Duncan Yo-Yo Mickey Mouse Dolls | On This Day In History Saturday, April 5, 1934 Birth Day of Marlene Pope Top Songs for 1934 Fun to be Fooled by Ira Gershwin Lost in a Fog by Dorothy Fields There Goes My Heart by Abner Silver Lost in a Fog by Dorothy Fields 1934 Prices Bread: $.08/loaf Mile: $0.45/gal Eggs: $0.53/doz Car: $575.00 Gas: $0.19/gal House: $5,972 Stamp: $0.03/each Avg Income: $1,506/yr Hot New Toys Mickey Mouse Dolls Parker Brothers, "Sorry!"

83: On This Day In History Saturday, June 19, 1954 Wedding Day of Marlene Pope and Floyd Schatz Top Songs for 1954 Mr. Sandman by Chordettes Sh-Boom by Crew-Cuts Oh! My Papa by Eddie Fisher 1954 Prices Bread: $.17/loaf Mile: $0.92/gal Eggs: $0.77/doz Car: $1,950.00 Gas: $0.29/gal House: $17,500 Stamp: $0.03/each Avg Income: $4,684/yr Min Wage: $0.75/hr Hot New Toys Robert the Robot Wheel-O | First Silverware Set | Marlene remembers: "One day after Floyd and I were engaged, I got off the streetcar and started walking home. An African American guy came up behind me and put his hand on my back and said, '"Don't you move, I have a knife on your back.'" Of course, I said, "oh, no you don't." I started running to my front porch. I was screaming and Dad came out. He and a neighbor looked for the guy but never found him. All I kept thinking was, '"I'll never give you my engagement ring.'" For a long time after that I was afraid of people walking up behind me.

84: (Top L to R) Easter weekend, Proposal weekend, Photo taken April 1956. (Bottom L to R) In White Sands, NM., Swimming during honeymoon vacation.

85: Marlene and Floyd were neighbors to Chuck Berry in Wentzville, Mo. When he heard they were going to sell their home he sent his secretary to ask Marlene the selling price. She told her the amount, and Floyd said, "Ga (aka, Gee), that's Chuck Berry, you should have doubled the price. He eventually bought their home. (Right) is an album he signed for them.

87: Karen Marie Schatz - March 29, 1957 Vicki Lynn Schatz - January 12, 1960 Marcia Gail Schatz - September 8, 1962 | Floyd and Marlene begin their family.

89: Floyd, Marlene and Karen Marie 1958 | Marlene with Vicki Lynn | Marcia 1963

90: Like branches on a tree, our lives may grow in different directions yet our roots remain as one.

92: Elementary School - J.L. Mudd High School - Fort Zumwalt

93: Family Vacation

96: Vacations to Colorado to visit the Hollands. Vacations to Key Largo to visit Uncle Jimmy--Lobster Trapper. Karen High School Graduation Easter Outfits.

97: Sweet Sixteen birthdays. Marcia and Vicki. Clock built by Dad. Vacation with Hollands. Mom's retirement party. Dad's birthday party at home on Compton Hill, St. Louis, Mo.

98: Pictures of Floyd and his brother, Jerry. They were not only brothers, but best friends as well. Floyd practically raised Jerry since he was so much older than him. They did a lot of carpentry work together. They were always there for one another. They worked hard together and played hard together--spending many days rebuilding the house in Portage after the many floods damaged the home. They loved to fish and often took weekend trips together to local fishing spots. Floyd missed Jerry terribly when his life was cut short by a heart attack. | When you look at your life, the greatest happinesses are family happinesses. ~Joyce Brothers

100: Above - The dreaded family portrait that graced the walls of our home. Mom and Dad -- picture taken for their church directory in Kimberling City.

101: Middle picture is of Dad's Retirement Party in St. Charles, Mo. | (Right) Mom and Dad. Christmas at Karen and Don's house in O'Fallon, Mo

104: Just one of their many vacation trips. This is a cruise that Marlene, Floyd, Wanda, and two of their friends, Yvonne and Tom Watson, took to the Caribbean. It was their first cruise. They enjoyed it so much they went on more.

105: This was a trip Marlene and Floyd took in the 1970's to Israel.

106: Next to God, nothing was more important to Mom and Dad than their family. They were always willing to help any way they could. They each had an amazing laugh--Dad's laugh was contagious--Mom's laugh was as cute as a school girl's giggle.

110: Mom, Dad, and Penny at Loughborough House | Dad and Penny in basement at Loughborough House | At Vicki and Les's House | Dad at Jonesburg House | Kimberling City | Dad in favorite chair at Loughborough House

111: Loughborough House | Mom and Dad's Motorhome | Dad's pontoon boat in Kimberling City | Dad and Aunt Wanda at Vicki and Les's House | Dad, Mom, Marcia, Karen, Vicki and Patty | Schatz Family Reunion at Jonesburg House

113: Hold us close to heart, Dear Mother. Rest unto you and Papa, arm in arm in Paradise. Watch us from afar; laugh when we laugh; hold us when we cry.

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  • By: Marcia P.
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  • Title: Letter to a Soldier
  • The Story of Floyd Schatz and Marlene Pope
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  • Started: over 6 years ago
  • Updated: 10 months ago

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