Enjoy up to 55% Off! Code: JOLLY Ends: 12/5 Details
Apply
  1. Help

Blank Canvas

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

Blank Canvas - Page Text Content

BC: La Fin

FC: Des Créations Francaises | By: Erik Liederbach

1: Le Debut

2: Ingredients 1 quart heavy cream 1 vanilla bean, split and scraped 1 cup vanilla sugar 6 large egg yolks 2 quarts hot water | Créme Brulée | The earliest known reference of creme brulée as we known it today appears in Franois Massialot's 1691 cookbook.

3: DIRECTIONS Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Place the cream, vanilla bean and its pulp into a medium saucepan set over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Remove from the heat, cover and allow to sit for 15 minutes. Remove the vanilla bean and reserve for another use. In a medium bowl, whisk together 1/2 cup sugar and the egg yolks until well blended and it just starts to lighten in color. Add the cream a little at a time, stirring continually. Pour the liquid into 6 (7 to 8-ounce) ramekins. Place the ramekins into a large cake pan or roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into the pan to come halfway up the sides of the ramekins. Bake just until the creme brulee is set, but still trembling in the center, approximately 40 to 45 minutes. Remove the ramekins from the roasting pan and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to 3 days. Remove the creme brulee from the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes prior to browning the sugar on top. Divide the remaining 1/2 cup vanilla sugar equally among the 6 dishes and spread evenly on top. Using a torch, melt the sugar and form a crispy top. Allow the creme brulee to sit for at least 5 minutes before serving.

4: La Crepe | Crepes originated in brittany.

5: Directions 1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and the eggs. Gradually add in the milk and water, stirring to combine. Add the salt and butter; beat until smooth. 2. Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each crepe. Tilt the pan with a circular motion so that the batter coats the surface evenly. 3. Cook the crepe for about 2 minutes, until the bottom is light brown. Loosen with a spatula, turn and cook the other side. Serve hot. | Ingredients 1 cup all-purpose flour 2 eggs 1/2 cup milk 1/2 cup water 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons butter, melted

6: Croque Monsieur | The Croque Monsieur, or “Crispy Mister,” appeared on Parisian café menus in 1910. The original Croque Monsieur was simply a hot ham and Gruyere cheese sandwich, fried in butter. Some believe it was accidentally created when French workers left their lunch pails by a hot radiator and came back later to discover the cheese in their sandwiches had melted.

7: Directions Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Melt the butter over low heat in a small saucepan and add the flour all at once, stirring with a wooden spoon for 2 minutes. Slowly pour the hot milk into the butter–flour mixture and cook, whisking constantly, until the sauce is thickened. Off the heat add the salt, pepper, nutmeg, 1/2 cup grated Gruyere, and the Parmesan and set aside. To toast the bread, place the slices on 2 baking sheets and bake for 5 minutes. Turn each slice and bake for another 2 minutes, until toasted. Lightly brush half the toasted breads with mustard, add a slice of ham to each, and sprinkle with half the remaining Gruyere. Top with another piece of toasted bread. Slather the tops with the cheese sauce, sprinkle with the remaining Gruyere, and bake the sandwiches for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for 3 to 5 minutes, or until the topping is bubbly and lightly browned. Serve hot. | Ingredients *2 tablespoons unsalted butter * 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour * 2 cups hot milk * 1 teaspoon kosher salt * 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper * Pinch nutmeg * 12 ounces Gruyere, grated (5 cups) * 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan * 16 slices white sandwich bread, crusts removed * Dijon mustard * 8 ounces baked Virginia ham, sliced but not paper thin

8: Belgian Waffle | The inventor of the Belgian waffle made famous by the 1964-65 New York World's Fair was Maurice Vermersch. Vermersch started making waffles from a recipe of his wife's when living in Belgium before the outbreak of World War II. After serving in the war, he started two restaurants in Belgium before making his World's Fair debut at the Brussels fair in 1960. Business went so well in Brussels that Vermersch and four other families decided to head to New York for the 1964 World's Fair. And when they arrived in Queens, the name of their product was changed from the Brussel Waffle to the Belgian Waffle. The name Belgian waffle was created in New York.

9: Directions Preheat the waffle iron according to the manufacturer's instructions. In 1 medium bowl sift together flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside. In a second bowl use the wooden spoon to beat together the egg yolks and sugar until sugar is completely dissolved and eggs have turned a pale yellow. Add the vanilla extract, melted butter, and milk to the eggs and whisk to combine. Combine the egg-milk mixture with the flour mixture and whisk just until blended. Do not over mix. In third bowl, beat the egg whites with an electric mixer until soft peaks form, about 1 minute. Using the rubber spatula, gently fold the egg whites into the waffle batter. Do not overmix! Coat the waffle iron with non-stick cooking spray and pour enough batter in iron to just cover waffle grid. Close and cook as per manufacturer's instructions until golden brown, about 2 to 3 minutes. Serve immediately. | Ingredients * 2 cups cake flour * 2 teaspoons baking powder * 1/2 teaspoon salt * 4 large eggs, separated * 2 tablespoons sugar * 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract * 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted * 2 cups milk * non-stick cooking spray

10: Macarons | Although predominantly a French confection, there has been much debate about its origins. Larousse Gastronomique cites the macaron as being created in 791 in a convent near Cormery. Some have traced its French debut back to the arrival of Catherine de' Medici's Italian pastry chefs whom she brought with her in 1533 upon marrying Henry II. In the 1830s, macarons were served two-by-two with the addition of jams, liqueurs, and spices. The macaron as it is known today was called the "Gerbet" or the "Paris macaron" and is the creation of Pierre Desfontaines of the French ptisserie Ladurée, composed of two almond meringue discs filled with a layer of buttercream, jam, or ganache filling.

11: Ingredients 6 oz sliced blanched almonds (not slivered; 2 cups) 1 1/2 cups confectioners sugar 3 large egg whites 3/4 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons granulated sugar Red or pink food coloring | Directions Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Pulse almonds with 1/2 cup confectioners sugar in a food processor until very finely ground, 2 to 3 minutes, then transfer to a bowl. Sift in remaining cup confectioners sugar, stirring to combine. Beat egg whites with salt in another bowl with an electric mixer at medium speed until they just hold soft peaks. Add granulated sugar, a little at a time, beating, then increase speed to high and continue to beat until whites just hold stiff, glossy peaks. Add drops of food coloring to reach desired shade and mix at low speed until evenly combined. Stir almond mixture into meringue with a rubber spatula until completely incorporated. (Meringue will deflate.) Spoon batter into bag, pressing out excess air, and snip off 1 corner of plastic bag to create a 1/4-inch opening. Twist bag firmly just above batter, then pipe peaked mounds of batter (the size of a chocolate kiss) onto lined sheets about 1 1/2 inches apart. Let cookies stand, uncovered, at room temperature until tops are no longer sticky and a light crust forms, 20 to 30 minutes. Meanwhile, put oven racks in upper and lower thirds of oven and preheat oven to 300F. Bake cookies, switching position of sheets halfway through baking, until crisp and edges are just slightly darker, 20 to 25 minutes. Cool completely on sheets on racks, about 30 minutes.

12: Escargo | Snail shells have been found in archaeological excavations, an indication that snails have been eaten since prehistoric times. A number of archaeological sites around the Mediterranean have been excavated yielding physical evidence of culinary use of several species of snails utilized as escargot. The Romans, in particular, are known to have considered escargot as an elite food, as noted in the writings of Pliny[disambiguation needed]. For example the species Otala lactea of edible snails has been recovered from Volubilis in present day Morocco. This archaeological recovery is from an era of Roman Empire occupation of this provincial capital, which site was known to embody a very highly developed ancient civilization.

13: Directions 1. Place escargots in a small bowl, and cover with cold water; set aside for 5 minutes. This will help to remove the canned flavor they may have. 2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Lightly grease an 8x8 inch baking dish. 3. Drain the water from the escargots and pat dry with a paper towel. Melt butter with the garlic in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the escargots and mushroom caps; cook and stir until the mushroom caps begin to soften, about 5 minutes. 4. Whisk together wine, cream, flour, pepper, and tarragon in a small bowl until the flour is no longer lumpy. Pour this into the skillet, and bring to a boil. Cook, stirring occasionally until the sauce thickens, about 10 minutes. 5. Remove the skillet from the heat, and use a spoon to place the mushrooms upside down into the prepared baking dish. Spoon an escargot into each mushroom cap. Pour the remaining sauce over the mushroom caps and into the baking dish. Sprinkle grated Parmesan cheese overtop. 6. Bake in preheated oven until the Parmesan cheese has turned golden brown, 10 to 15 minutes. | Ingredients * 1 (7 ounce) can escargots, drained * 6 tablespoons butter * 1 clove garlic, minced * 20 mushrooms, stems removed * 1/3 cup white wine * 1/3 cup cream * 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour * 1 pinch ground black pepper to taste * 1/4 teaspoon dried tarragon *1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese

14: Ingredients 1 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast 3 tablespoons warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C) 1 teaspoon white sugar 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons white sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 2/3 cup warm milk 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2/3 cup unsalted butter, chilled 1 egg 1 tablespoon water | Croissant | Origin The kipferl - ancestor of the croissant - has been documented in Austria going back at least as far as the 13th century, in various shapes.The "birth" of the croissant itself - that is, its adaptation from the plainer form of kipferl, before its subsequent evolution (to a puff pastry) - can be dated with some precision to at latest 1839 (some say 1838), when an Austrian artillery officer, August Zang, founded a Viennese Bakery ("Boulangerie Viennoise") at 92, rue de Richelieu in Paris.

15: Directions Combine yeast, warm water, and 1 teaspoon sugar. Allow to stand until creamy and frothy. Measure flour into a mixing bowl. Dissolve 2 teaspoons sugar and salt in warm milk. Blend into flour along with yeast and oil. Mix well; knead until smooth. Cover, and let rise until over triple in volume. Deflate gently, and let rise again until doubled. Deflate and chill 20 minutes. Massage butter until pliable, but not soft and oily. Pat dough into a 14 x 8 inch rectangle. Smear butter over top two thirds, leaving 1/4 inch margin all around. Fold unbuttered third over middle third, and buttered top third down over that. Turn 90 degrees, so that folds are to left and right. Roll out to a 14 x 6 inch rectangle. Fold in three again. Sprinkle lightly with flour, and put dough in a plastic bag. Refrigerate 2 hours. Unwrap, sprinkle with flour, and deflate gently. Roll to a 14 x 6 inch rectangle, and fold again. Turn 90 degrees, and repeat. Wrap, and chill 2 hours. To shape, roll dough out to a 20 x 5 inch rectangle. Cut in half crosswise, and chill half while shaping the other half. Roll out to a 15 x 5 inch rectangle. Cut into three 5 x 5 inch squares. Cut each square in half diagonally. Roll each triangle lightly to elongate the point, and make it 7 inches long. Grab the other 2 points, and stretch them out slightly as you roll it up. Place on a baking sheet, curving slightly. Let shaped croissants rise until puffy and light. In a small bowl, beat together egg and 1 tablespoon water. Glaze croissants with egg wash. Bake in a preheated 475 degrees F (245 degrees C) oven for 12 to 15 minutes.

16: Croque Madame | Origin The name dates to around 1960. | Ingredients 4 tablespoons butter, divided 1 rounded tablespoon all-purpose flour 1 cup milk Salt and pepper 1/8 teaspoon fresh grated nutmeg, eyeball it 2 teaspoons Dijon style mustard 2 slices white bread 2 large eggs 4 slices deli ham 4 slices deli Swiss cheese Chopped parsley leaves, chives or thyme leaves, for garnish - choose from any or all on hand

17: Directions Place a small sauce pot over medium low heat and melt 2 tablespoons butter in it. Whisk in a rounded tablespoon of flour and cook 1 minute or so. Whisk in milk and bring to a bubble then drop heat to low. Season the sauce with salt, pepper, nutmeg and Dijon. When sauce coats back of a spoon, turn off heat. Heat 1 tablespoon of butter in each of 2 medium nonstick skillets, both over medium low heat. When butter melts add 2 large eggs to the first skillet, keeping the whites separate from each other. To the second skillet add 2 slices bread and toast lightly on first side then turn the bread. Top turned bread liberally with sauce and 2 slices of the ham and the Swiss cheese on each slice of bread. Use a spatula to transfer the eggs to the tops of the open faced sandwiches. Cover the pan with foil and turn off heat. Let pan stand 5 minutes to melt cheese and set sauce and eggs. Top sandwiches with chopped herb or herbs of choice and serve. Spoon any leftover sauce over top of the eggs before garnishing.

18: Ingredients 1/4 cup butter 3 onions, thinly sliced 1 teaspoon white sugar 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 2 1/2 cups water 1/2 cup red wine 2 (10.5 ounce) cans condensed beef broth 1 French baguette 8 ounces sliced Swiss cheese | French Onion Soup | Origin Onion soups have been popular at least as far back as Roman times. They were, throughout history, seen as food for poor people, as onions were plentiful and easy to grow. The modern version of this soup originates in France in the 18th century

19: Directions Melt butter or margarine in a 4 quart saucepan. Stir in sugar. Cook onions over medium heat for 10 minutes, or until golden brown. Stir in flour until well blended with the onions and pan juices. Add water, wine, and beef broth; heat to boiling. Reduce heat to low. Cover soup, and simmer for 10 minutes. Cut four 1 inch thick slices of bread from the loaf. Toast the bread slices at 325 degrees F (165 degrees C) just until browned, about 10 minutes. Reserve the remaining bread to serve with the soup. Ladle soup into four 12 ounce, oven-safe bowls. Place 1 slice toasted bread on top of the soup in each bowl. Fold Swiss cheese slices, and fit onto toasted bread slices. Place soup bowls on a cookie sheet for easier handling. Bake at 425 degrees F (220 degrees C) for 10 minutes, or just until cheese is melted

20: Cassoulet | Ingredients: 4 lb. boneless pork shoulder, cut into 8 pieces and trimmed of excess fat Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 2 Tbs. canola oil 1 cup panko 4 oz. thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips 4 cups coarsely chopped yellow onions (about 3 medium onions) 2 cups dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc 1/4 cup tomato paste 1 can (35 oz.) peeled Italian plum tomatoes, drained and coarsely chopped 2 cups chicken broth 12 cups cooked Great Northern beans or other small white beans, drained 6 fully cooked or smoked chorizo or garlic sausage links, about 1 1/2 lb. total, each halved on the diagonal 1 garlic head, halved crosswise 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, plus more for garnish 1 lb. baguette, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices Extra-virgin olive oil for brushing Coarse sea salt, such as sel gris, for garnish | What is the origin of the cassoulet? Some say that it appeared after the discovery of the new world by Christopher Columbus. The beans, which make it up, were originally imported from the Americas by him. Others say that during the "100 years war" (1337 – 1453), when Castelnaudary was under siege. The mayor of the city ordered the preparation of one dish, made up of all the foods available, so the besieged would keep a full stomach. Finally some think that the cassoulet was brought by the Arabs during the 12th century. They brought with them the white "broad bean" which they prepared with sheep. The "broad bean" being later replaced with the beans Christopher Columbus brought back from the Americas.

21: Ingredients: 4 lb. boneless pork shoulder, cut into 8 pieces and trimmed of excess fat Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste 2 Tbs. canola oil 1 cup panko 4 oz. thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips 4 cups coarsely chopped yellow onions (about 3 medium onions) 2 cups dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc 1/4 cup tomato paste 1 can (35 oz.) peeled Italian plum tomatoes, drained and coarsely chopped 2 cups chicken broth 12 cups cooked Great Northern beans or other small white beans, drained 6 fully cooked or smoked chorizo or garlic sausage links, about 1 1/2 lb. total, each halved on the diagonal 1 garlic head, halved crosswise 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, plus more for garnish 1 lb. baguette, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices Extra-virgin olive oil for brushing Coarse sea salt, such as sel gris, for garnish Directions: Season the pork generously with kosher salt and pepper; set aside. In the stovetop-safe insert of a slow cooker over medium-high heat, combine the canola oil and panko. Cook, stirring constantly, until the panko is toasted and golden, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer the panko to a baking sheet and season with kosher salt and pepper. Add the bacon to the insert and cook until crisp on both sides, about 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Reserve the bacon fat in the insert. Add half of the pork to the insert and brown on all sides, 7 to 8 minutes total. Transfer to a platter. Repeat with the remaining pork. Add the onions and 1 tsp. kosher salt to the insert and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown and softened, about 7 minutes. Add the wine and simmer until reduced by half, about 8 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, tomatoes and broth. Remove the insert from the heat and add the beans, pork, chorizo and garlic. Place the insert on the slow-cooker base, cover and cook on low until the pork pulls apart easily with a fork, 9 to 10 hours. Skim off the fat, and remove and discard the garlic. Fold in the panko and the 1/4 cup parsley. Adjust the seasonings with kosher salt and pepper. Position a rack in the lower third of an oven and preheat the broiler. Brush the baguette slices with olive oil. Arrange the slices, oiled side up, on top of the cassoulet, overlapping them. Broil until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Let the cassoulet stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes before serving. Sprinkle each serving with the reserved bacon, sea salt and parsley. Serves 8 to 10. Adapted from a recipe by Thomas Keller, Chef/Owner, The French Laundry. | Directions: Season the pork generously with kosher salt and pepper; set aside. In the stovetop-safe insert of a slow cooker over medium-high heat, combine the canola oil and panko. Cook, stirring constantly, until the panko is toasted and golden, 4 to 6 minutes. Transfer the panko to a baking sheet and season with kosher salt and pepper. Add the bacon to the insert and cook until crisp on both sides, about 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Reserve the bacon fat in the insert. Add half of the pork to the insert and brown on all sides, 7 to 8 minutes total. Transfer to a platter. Repeat with the remaining pork. Add the onions and 1 tsp. kosher salt to the insert and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown and softened, about 7 minutes. Add the wine and simmer until reduced by half, about 8 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, tomatoes and broth. Remove the insert from the heat and add the beans, pork, chorizo and garlic. Place the insert on the slow-cooker base, cover and cook on low until the pork pulls apart easily with a fork, 9 to 10 hours. Skim off the fat, and remove and discard the garlic. Fold in the panko and the 1/4 cup parsley. Adjust the seasonings with kosher salt and pepper. Position a rack in the lower third of an oven and preheat the broiler. Brush the baguette slices with olive oil. Arrange the slices, oiled side up, on top of the cassoulet, overlapping them. Broil until golden brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Let the cassoulet stand at room temperature for about 30 minutes before serving. Sprinkle each serving with the reserved bacon, sea salt and parsley. Serves 8 to 10. Adapted from a recipe by Thomas Keller, Chef/Owner, The French Laundry.

22: Origin The word ratatouille comes from Occitan ratatolha and the recipe comes from Occitan cuisine. The French touiller means to toss food. Ratatouille originated in the area around present day Occitan Provena (French: Provence) and Nia (French: Nice); the Catalan "xamfaina" and the Majorcan "tombet" are versions of the same dish. | Ratatouille | Ingredients 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 teaspoons dried parsley 1 eggplant, cut into 1/2 inch cubes salt to taste 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 zucchini, sliced 1 large onion, sliced into rings 2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms 1 green bell pepper, sliced 2 large tomatoes, chopped

23: Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Coat bottom and sides of a 1 1/2 quart casserole dish with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Heat remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Saute garlic until lightly browned. Mix in parsley and eggplant. Saute until eggplant is soft, about 10 minutes. Season with salt to taste. Spread eggplant mixture evenly across bottom of prepared casserole dish. Sprinkle with a few tablespoons of Parmesan cheese. Spread zucchini in an even layer over top. Lightly salt and sprinkle with a little more cheese. Continue layering in this fashion, with onion, mushrooms, bell pepper, and tomatoes, covering each layer with a sprinkling of salt and cheese. Bake in preheated oven for 45 minutes.

Sizes: mini|medium|large|gigantic
Erik Liederbach
  • By: Erik L.
  • Joined: almost 6 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 0
No contributors

About This Mixbook

  • Title: Blank Canvas
  • Theme for Mixbook Scrapbookers
  • Tags: None
  • Started: almost 6 years ago
  • Updated: almost 6 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order