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FC: The Dudek Family Scrapbook

1: Dear Diary,My name is Norbort Dudek and I am a 40 year old gentleman with dark brown hair. I have eight sisters. My oldest sister, Agata, is 22 years old and she is a factory worker. Lena, is 17 years old and is a servant for a rich family. My other sister, Tedia, is a year old who helps my mom with working around the house. My 9 year old sister, Gita, also helps my mom with common work around the house. Laka, is 7 years old and help whenever she can be she is still too young to do much work. My second youngest sister, Nata, is 5 years old and does not do anything. The newest number of our family, Urok, is 2 years old.

2: Poland Flag in the 1890's

4: Back in Poland we used Euros and we spoke polish. We ate stuffed cabbage, breaded boneless pork chops, chocolate cake, hunter's stew, cabbage, fried bacon, sausage soup, pork tripe, and pigs knuckle in horseradish. We played a game called Blind Woman and we have to blind fold one person and the blinded person has to try to touch the other people while they run away. Another game we played was called Every thing With Feathers Flies. In this game players choose a leader for the game who will call out a animal. If that animal has feathers the other players should hit the table and repeat the name of the animal said. If someone hits the table when an animal without feathers is called out that person is eliminated. The last person left is the winner and becomes the leader for the next game.

5: I left my homeland of Poland because we heard there were more opportunities in America. Also, we felt that we could reach our full potential in America. When we traveled to America it took our family about 5 weeks. Storms slowed the trip by a couple of days. The conditions on the ship were terrible. It smelled horrible because the throw up from people getting sea sick. It was also very crowded. All you could hear was people talking and people moaning from being sick. When we were on the deck all you saw was water.

6: For this trip we could only bring a little bit of our personal possessions. I chose to bring a picture of my family and a blanket that made mother had made me many years ago. I brought these items because those two things meant the most to me and I couldn't bring anything else because space was very limited. I also brought along all the essentials that we absolutely needed. When I first saw the American coastline I was overwhelmed with joy and excitement. I was excited that the journey was finally over and that I could start my new life in this new country.

7: After we arrived at Ellis Island we immediately went through examination. Doctors inspected us for about two minutes. They checked out eyes to check for a blindness disease. They also checked our hair, neck, arms, and legs to make sure we were able to work. We saw people having to go back to their home country because they were too ill or weak to work. Then we were asked a series of questions for interrogation. After that we were finally free. We were a very poor family so we didn't have many options as to where to live. We lived in a tenement. Our whole family had to cram into two separate rooms

8: I saw my two sisters and brother today! I was so excited to meet up with their families again and to finally get to talk to them once again. They have already found jobs which is fantastic! Now that I'm in America my family and I will be learning English. For now we just use common gestures to get around town. As of right now we are just bartering with people. We are trying to eat very inexpensive foods like bread and rice. I feel that my life here in America will be much greater than the life I had in Poland. I'm excited for both my family and I!

9: Hello family and friends, The war continues on and it does not look like it will end soon. I sit in a trench all day long and watch people die. The conditions in the trench are terrible. It smells awful and people are getting diseases and dying. When I peak my head above the trench I see barren land with no vegetation and barb wire so that the enemies cannot run to the other side. It is also very cold and we always have to keep alert. When people get shot while they are inside the trench there is no where to put them so we just have to let the lifeless body lay in the trench until we are able to move it somewhere else.I hope that you find comfort at home.

10: Dear friends and family, I wish I could just come home. My men and I are exhausted from fighting all day and all night long. I just wish we would have never entered this war. If the Germans wouldn't have shot down our merchant ships then everything would have been just fine! Also, if the Germans wouldn't have sent the Zimmerman note to Mexico then we wouldn't be here. I don't think Mexico would have accepted the offer anyways because it wouldn't be worth the land they would have gotten if they fought us. Hope everything is well!

11: Dear friends and family, The war finally ended! I might be able to come home now but we might get deployed in Germany. The Treaty of Versailles ended WWI but the United States continues to go to war with Germany. It feels good to finally come out of our trenches and remove the dead bodies from the trenches. Hopefully some of my fellow soldiers can see a nearby doctor and get some medical treatment for the diseases they have contracted from being in the trenches for too long. Hopefully I can return home and see all of you again!

12: Dear son, We are all so proud of you and what you are doing for this country if great! We are doing well and are praying that you are doing well also. Whenever we walk around town we will always see propaganda posters about the war. They are always trying to recruit more people for the war effort, including women! We always try to keep up to date on the war by listening to the radio. It disappoints me that we had to enter this terrible war but I'm glad that you are brave enough to be apart of it! Please be safe and try to come home soon. We all wish you luck!

13: "Observation balloons were commonly adopted by all sides and considered ideal in the static trench warfare conditions largely peculiar to the First World War." "Gas or hot-air propelled, such balloons were by no means a new innovation in terms of military adoption, having been put to use as early as the 18th and 19th centuries. However they were deployed extensively along the Western Front in particular. Winched into the air, seldom alone, they were usually accompanied by one or two others for comparative observation purposes." "Observation readings were passed down via the use of flags or occasionally by radio, and balloon operators would generally remain in the air for hours at a spell. It was regarded as a dangerous job, for although observation balloons were invariably heavily protected by anti-aircraft and machine gun fire and by wire meshes dangled between groups of balloons, they were often the irresistible stationary target of enemy aircraft." "So far as the various air forces were concerned, bringing down an observation balloon was regarded as a valid victory and were added to each pilot's list of 'kills' in the same manner as enemy aircraft. This was because downing balloons was considered something of a hazardous occupation, although some pilots established reputations as 'balloon busters' (such as the Belgian Willy Coppens, who brought down 35 balloons, the highest single total of the war)." Bringing down balloons was deceptively problematic. Standard bullets were usually insufficient in themselves, passing directly through the balloon's fabric without setting it alight. When under attack operators on the ground would hastily winch down the balloon and unless the attacking aircraft could succeed in setting the balloon alight - by the use of incendiary or explosive bullets - he would have failed in his mission. Many pilots were careful not to pursue balloons beneath 1,000 feet for fear of the devastating consequences of anti-aircraft fire. "British servicemen were permitted to don parachutes to escape should the balloon come under successful enemy fire, although the chances of a safe escape once the balloon was ablaze was slim." "Balloons were additionally used for home defense purposes and were flown in groups via cables in major cities such as London, each balloon dangling steel cables to form a kind of apron into which attacking enemy aircraft could find themselves entangled and so be brought down. To evade such defenses attacking aircraft were obliged to fly at ever higher altitudes, reducing the likelihood of a successful, accurate bombing raid." | Observation balloons were commonly adopted by all sides and considered ideal in the static trench warfare conditions largely peculiar to the First World War. Gas or hot-air propelled, such balloons were by no means a new innovation in terms of military adoption, having been put to use as early as the 18th and 19th centuries. However they were deployed extensively along the Western Front in particular. Winched into the air, seldom alone, they were usually accompanied by one or two others for comparative observation purposes. Observation readings were passed down via the use of flags or occasionally by radio, and balloon operators would generally remain in the air for hours at a spell. It was regarded as a dangerous job, for although observation balloons were invariably heavily protected by anti-aircraft and machine gun fire and by wire meshes dangled between groups of balloons, they were often the irresistible stationary target of enemy aircraft. So far as the various air forces were concerned, bringing down an observation balloon was regarded as a valid victory and were added to each pilot's list of 'kills' in the same manner as enemy aircraft. This was because downing balloons was considered something of a hazardous occupation, although some pilots established reputations as 'balloon busters' (such as the Belgian Willy Coppens, who brought down 35 balloons, the highest single total of the war). Bringing down balloons was deceptively problematic. Standard bullets were usually insufficient in themselves, passing directly through the balloon's fabric without setting it alight. When under attack operators on the ground would hastily winch down the balloon and unless the attacking aircraft could succeed in setting the balloon alight - by the use of incendiary or explosive bullets - he would have failed in his mission. Many pilots were careful not to pursue balloons beneath 1,000 feet for fear of the devastating consequences of anti-aircraft fire. British servicemen were permitted to don parachutes to escape should the balloon come under successful enemy fire, although the chances of a safe escape once the balloon was ablaze was slim. Balloons were additionally used for home defence purposes and were flown in groups via cables in major cities such as London, each balloon dangling steel cables to form a kind of apron into which attacking enemy aircraft could find themselves entangled and so be brought down. To evade such defences attacking aircraft were obliged to fly at ever higher altitudes, reducing the likelihood of a successful, accurate bombing raid.

14: "I have called the Congress into extraordinary session because there are serious, very serious, choices of policy to be made, and made immediately, which it was neither right nor constitutionally permissible that I should assume the responsibility of making." "On the 3d of February last I officially laid before you the extraordinary announcement of the Imperial German Government that on and after the 1st day of February it was its purpose to put aside all restraints of law or of humanity and use its submarines to sink every vessel that sought to approach either the ports of Great Britain and Ireland or the western coasts of Europe or any of the ports controlled by the enemies of Germany within the Mediterranean. That had seemed to be the object of the German submarine warfare earlier in the war, but since April of last year the Imperial Government had somewhat restrained the commanders of its undersea craft in conformity with its promise then given to us that passenger boats should not be sunk and that due warning would be given to all other vessels which its submarines might seek to destroy, when no resistance was offered or escape attempted, and care taken that their crews were given at least a fair chance to save their lives in their open boats. The precautions taken were meagre and haphazard enough, as was proved in distressing instance after instance in the progress of the cruel and unmanly business, but a certain degree of restraint was observed The new policy has swept every restriction aside. Vessels of every kind, whatever their flag, their character, their cargo, their destination, their errand, have been ruthlessly sent to the bottom without warning and without thought of help or mercy for those on board, the vessels of friendly neutrals along with those of belligerents. Even hospital ships and ships carrying relief to the sorely bereaved and stricken people of Belgium, though the latter were provided with safe-conduct through the proscribed areas by the German Government itself and were distinguished by unmistakable marks of identity, have been sunk with the same reckless lack of compassion or of principle." This article was part of Wilson's litter to congress

15: I HAVE written our story because so many people have asked me to. Also, in the hope of helping Poland. She is worthy of help, martyred, devastated, trodden under the Prussian boot as she is! The wife of a gallant Pole now serving humanity with the Russian Army as inspector-in-chief of the Sanitary Engineers, and the mother of two sons, to say nothing of a dear little daughter, I have the cause of Poland at heart! Much pressure has been brought to bear upon me, that I should advocate the sending of food into Poland. I cannot, in the light of my own experiences do so. Under the existing circumstances I know it would riot be the Poles who would eat the bread sent them! After the war is over, those still alive, the fittest who survive, will need quick and generous help from America---seeds to plant their fields, implements to use in cultivating them. Before the war my husband worked so hard to help the peasants; to educate them, to teach them how to get the most out of their bits of land. How often I have driven with him away off to some tiny village, where the people would be gathered in the school, to hear how to plant their fields, their good kind faces weather-beaten, and showing the difficulty of their struggle with nature! In Suwalki there was a Polish club, an agricultural society, with a fine building, where agricultural machines might be rented, or people helped in buying. Noble and peasant could borrow money to improve their land. How painful it was to see those machines dragged off to East Prussia, knowing the effort it had cost to get them! This is part of a Polish woman's story when Germany invaded Prussia.

16: Dear grandparents, I miss you both greatly and we are experiencing many difficulties here over in Europe. No one is sure when the war will end but we hope it will soon. Hitler has invaded Poland and has left great destruction. He is trying to control all of Europe but we are managing to hold off the Nazis. They have started using air planes for the war. They have played a major role. Sometimes, some air crafts will crash near us after they have been shot down. This war has split many countries in Europe to pieces. The Nazi force does not look like it's giving up and they continue to raid our position. We always have to be on lookout because we are never sure when they will attack us. I hope all is well back home and hopefully i will be with you again soon!

17: Dear grandparents, I am sure all is well back at home but the war does not look like it is lightening up. We are still unsure as to when the war will end but hopefully it's soon! Tanks have been rolling by where we are stationed but for some odd reason they haven't spotted us yet. We still fear for our lives every day and even some of them have gave their lives. We do not get attacked as often as we did and hopefully it stay that way. We still have to fight off the few groups of Nazis that do walk past every day. I have taken many lives and I do not want to take anymore. Hitler continues to do his damage and there are rumors that there are concentration camps inside Germany that have mostly Jews and people with disabilities. They say that they torture them there until they die. Well, i hope you guys are doing well!

18: Dear grandparents, The war is almost ended! Talks about a nuclear bomb being dropped on Japan have spread and the Germans are lightening up! We are advancing now through Europe and it seems like there are fewer and fewer Nazis. People are saying that Hitler has committed suicide and that the was will be over very soon. I am hoping that I will return home very soon. The concentration camps are being destroyed and we are helping every one out of them and we are trying to return them to health. The Germans tried destroying the camps and all the evidence with it but we got there in time to save the people! I hope you are all well at home and I hope and can see you guys soon!

19: Dear Grandson, We are all doing well at home! We have seen a lot of propaganda posters that are trying to get people to join the war effort whether it's working in factories to make supplies for soldiers or actually going over seas to join the fight. We try and listen to the radio to listen for war news as it comes in. Regular factories have been turned into war factories that make bullets, bombs, and supplies for the soldiers. Everyone is trying to join the war effort no matter what they're doing whether it's carpooling or bringing can goods for the soldiers. Recycling has also been a big part of the war effort.

20: Dear grandson, We have been very proud of you and what you have been doing for our country. We are glad that the war is finally over and hopefully you can return home safe. We have noticed that the propaganda posters have been going down and that there isn't as much people trying to get people to do things for the war and to join the war effort. We hope you will return home soon and please be safe.

21: European Theater

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  • By: Tyler K.
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  • Title: Blank Canvas
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