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BC: The poem "Mother to Son" is written by Langston Hughes. This poem makes me feel happy and inspired because a mother just won't give up, and encourages her son not to give up and to fight through the hardest of times. This poem has no particular setting. The structure of this poem is one big stanza with twenty lines in it. The speaker is the mother who is talking to her son. It is a first person point of view because it is the mother talking to her son. The speaker is involved in encouraging her son not to give up, but is not involved in the reflection because it is her son's choice not hers. No parts of this poem surprise me because the mother is firm to her son about not giving up throughout the whole poem. The poem uses imagery so I could imagine the mother's staircase that she describes.

FC: Nathan Godeaux Poetry Project Carter-B2

2: Table of Contents Part One Page 3- Acrostic Poem Page 4- Formula Poem Page 5- Definition Poem Page 6- Biopoem Page 7- Diamante Poem Page 8- Name Poem Page 9- Where I'm From Page 10- Haiku Poem Page 11- Personal Poem Page 12- Limerick Poem Page 13- Someday Poem Page 14- Fog Poem Page 15- Ode Poem Page 16- Free Verse Poem Page 17- Couplet Poem Part Two Page 18- Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Poem Page 19-21- Road Not Taken by Robert Frost TPCASTT Page 22-23- Macavity by T. S. Elliot Poem Page 24-26- Macavity by T. S. Elliot TPCASTT | Part Three Page 27- Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Poem Page 28-Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Written Response Page 29- Mother To Son by Langston Hughes Poem Page 29/back cover- Mother To Son by Langston Hughes Written Response

3: Acrostic Poem M- messy to play with U- unique texture D- dirt that is wet

4: Formula Poem sleeping, hunting, fighting the king loin viciously rules the African Safari

5: Definition Poem chips tasty snack flavored corn chips that crunch when bitten to form sharp shaped smaller chips

6: Biopoem Nathan funny, smart, energetic, talkative only child lover of soccer has a fear of heights who needs god who gives advice who would like to see Barcelona, Spain Bossier City, Louisiana Godeaux

7: Diamante Poem Spring humid, warm watering, planting, melting Soccer season, ragin watermelons sprouting, growing, harvesting muggy, hot Summer

8: N- nice A- athletic T- talkative H- helpful A- awesome soccer player N- nerd | Name Poem

9: Where I'm From Poem I am from the country, from black gold and little children. I am from the farms behind the house. (Bright green shells, nestled around ripening corn.) I am from the Cajun Music Capitol the big Mamou roads whose dirt back roads I remember as if they were the back of my hand I'm from gumbo and runners from Scott and Christina I'm from the jokers and the cookers from t-boy! and Godeaux! I follow the lord to make the right choices as a lamb in his herd and the lord's prayer I know by heart I'm from my family southern food and Cajun music From the toenails my grandfather lost to running the eye my father lost to a gun leaf-fall from the family tree

10: Haiku Poem Oh, Summer is here with almighty rays of light from heavens above

11: Personal Poem I am helpful and athletic I wonder what it's like to be famous I hear soccer balls screaming I see myself zooming around the world I want for people to stop bullying I am helpful and athletic I pretend to be special I feel the television cooking my brain I touch my friends with concerned fingers I worry about another world war I cry about close deaths I am helpful and athletic I understand that I'm not perfect I say to be the best person you can be I hope to one day be rich I am helpful and athletic

12: Limerick Poem There was a cat with a hat, Who stood on a mat. The cat pounced, and announced, "One day I will catch you fat old, old rat."

13: Someday Poem SOMEDAY... Someday I will make the high school soccer team. Someday I will be a graduate at the university of Notre Dame. Someday I will visit Barcelona, Spain. Someday I will play soccer for FC Barcelona. Someday I will be the best soccer player in the world. Someday I will have my talents noticed. Someday...

14: Fog Poem Fog only advances forward fog is the silent mover for fog is a white, impenetrable blanket that fogs glass up

15: Ode Poem Oh! Glorious Summer, how amazing you are You are warm and beautiful Your are greeted by thankful children who are just getting out of a usual dreadful school year to rest their tired minds Summer is never wished to leave but has to find an end to receive another unwanted school year Oh Summer please stay!

16: Free Verse Poem I see the world dancing, the different dances I see; Some of the school children-all dancing to the harlem shake The baker dancing to 90's music while cooking dough The farmer dances into his work boots to go to work The construction workers dancing and working to the beat of the song The day belongs to dancing with everyone smiling and letting loose.

17: Couplet Poem The world is a beautiful place It is the god's project ace. It is he who created this race Molded by his mind we are birthplace. Soccer is the most played sport Therefore it gets the most support. Chips are my favorite snack To put on the rack.

18: The Road Not Taken TWO roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.

19: Have you ever had to make a hard decision in life? How did you decide what to do? The poem "The Road Not Taken" by Robert Frost is about making a hard decision. Some choices in life aren't easy. This poem can be interpreted in many ways. In line one and two I see it as two roads diverged and the traveler is sorry that he could not travel both. Lines three through five mean being only one person he thought about it long and hard while he looked down both roads as far as he could. The meaning of lines six through eight are looking down the other one after he looked down the other he gave what he felt was his better claim because it was less traveled. Robert Frost means in lines nine through eleven that they looked about the same, and had been used about the same amount of times that they lay equally the same that morning. No one had took either path that morning as the leaves were the same he kept the more traveled road for another day, but sad because he knew that things led on to more things so that he knew he probably wouldn't ever come back to the other road are what lines twelve through fifteen mean. Lines sixteen through twenty mean that he is sad and sighs to show it that he will tell this story a few years from now that two roads split, and he took the one people used less often and

20: it has changed everything. Every poem has connotation and attitude. The connotation is the use of poetic devices in a poem. Robert Frost uses imagery, sound devices, and a figure of speech. He uses imagery by saying, "two roads diverged in a yellow wood, to where it bent in the undergrowth, and because it was grassy," in lines one, five, and eight. The sound device used is rhythm. The rhythm is a b a a b c c d c d e f e e f g h g g h. It is used to help the poem flow while the reader is reading it. Symbolism is the figure of speech that is used. The two roads diverging means that there is a hard life choice to be made which is symbolism. Frost's attitude toward the subject is sad because he can only travel one of the two roads. The title can mean something different to you after you find out what the poem means. You could have thought that the title just meant two roads split and you had to chose which one to go down, but after reading the poem you could think that the roads splitting means a life choice that you have to make. In the poem, "The Road Not Taken," there is a shift towards the end. The author is sad about only being able to travel down one road, but is happy because the road

21: he chose has changed everything for him. The theme of the poem is the life lesson learned from the poem. The life lesson in this poem is making a hard choice in life. Some choices in life aren't easy.

22: Macavity Macavity's a Mystery Cat: he's called the Hidden Paw-- For he's the master criminal who can defy the Law. He's the bafflement of Scotland Yard, the Flying Squad's despair: For when they reach the scene of crime--Macavity's not there! Macavity, Macavity, there's no on like Macavity, He's broken every human law, he breaks the law of gravity. His powers of levitation would make a fakir stare, And when you reach the scene of crime--Macavity's not there! You may seek him in the basement, you may look up in the air-- But I tell you once and once again, Macavity's not there! Macavity's a ginger cat, he's very tall and thin; You would know him if you saw him, for his eyes are sunken in. His brow is deeply lined with thought, his head is highly doomed; His coat is dusty from neglect, his whiskers are uncombed. He sways his head from side to side, with movements like a snake; And when you think he's half asleep, he's always wide awake. Macavity, Macavity, there's no one like Macavity, For he's a fiend in feline shape, a monster of depravity. You may meet him in a by-street, you may see him in the square-- But when a crime's discovered, then Macavity's not there! He's outwardly respectable. (They say he cheats at cards.) And his footprints are not found in any file of Scotland Yard's. And when the larder's looted, or the jewel-case is rifled, Or when the milk is missing, or another Peke's been stifled, Or the greenhouse glass is broken, and the trellis past repair-- Ay, there's the wonder of the thing! Macavity's not there!

23: And when the Foreign Office finds a Treaty's gone astray, Or the Admiralty lose some plans and drawings by the way, There may be a scap of paper in the hall or on the stair-- But it's useless of investigate--Macavity's not there! And when the loss has been disclosed, the Secret Service say: "It must have been Macavity!"--but he's a mile away. You'll be sure to find him resting, or a-licking of his thumbs, Or engaged in doing complicated long division sums. Macavity, Macavity, there's no one like Macacity, There never was a Cat of such deceitfulness and suavity. He always has an alibit, or one or two to spare: And whatever time the deed took place--MACAVITY WASN'T THERE! And they say that all the Cats whose wicked deeds are widely known (I might mention Mungojerrie, I might mention Griddlebone) Are nothing more than agents for the Cat who all the time Just controls their operations: the Napoleon of Crime!

24: Can you baffle the entire England police? The cat in "Macavity" by T. S. Elliot can, and has several times. The cat's name is Macavity, and he is the bafflement of the England police. Macavity is a fast and sneaky cat who never gets caught. This poem can have many different meanings. Lines one through four mean that he is a mysterious cat who is called the hidden paw that is a master criminal whom defies the law, and he confuses the England police while he embarrasses the secret service. By the time cops get to the scene of the crime Macavity isn't there. In lines five through ten it means there is no one like him, he breaks all laws, even the law of gravity, while he levitates to make people stare when the police get there he isn't there. You can look in the basement or in the air, but Macavity won't be there. Lines eleven through fifteen mean he is orange, tall, and thin so that if you saw him you would know it is him because his eyes are sunken in, his brow is lined with thought, he isn't groomed, and his head sways side to side like a snake. When he looks half asleep don't let it fool you he is wide awake. In lines sixteen through twenty it means that no one is like him because he is a devil in the form of a cat that you might see by the street, but when a crime happens Macavity isn't there.

25: He is respectable, but he cheats at playing cards. The meaning of lines twenty one through twenty six are there are no foot prints of his in the police station, and when jewelry has been stolen, milk is missing, another guard has been killed, or the greenhouse glass has been broken past repair Macavity isn't there. Lines twenty seven through thirty mean when a treaty is missing or the court loses some plans you might be lucky to find a scrap of paper in the hall or on the stairs, but there is no point in investigating it Macavity isn't there. The meaning of lines thirty one through thirty five mean that when the investigation is over the secret service say it must have been Macavity, but we won't catch him because he is a mile away. You may see him resting, licking his thumbs, or doing long division sums, but no one is like Macavity. Lines thirty six through thirty nine mean there has never been such a cat that is so well mannered, but lies so much. He always has an alibi, and when the crime was committed he wasn't there. Lines forty through forty two mean that the bad cats that you hear only work for Macavity because he is the master at being wicked. Every poem has a connotation and attitude. This poem uses imagery, personification, and a sound device. Imagery is used in lines eleven through fourteen by describing

26: Macavity. Macavity is given human qualities because he can give alibis to humans, and they can understand him. Alliteration is used when the poet keeps repeating that there is no one like Macavity. The poet's attitude during this poem seems to be kind of amused because this cat keeps outsmarting the police. The title can mean something different to you after you find out what the poem means. At the beginning you might not know what it means because it is a name, but after you read the poem it could mean that it is the name of a mischievous, devil cat named Macavity. There isn't a shift in this poem because the mood never changes. In this story, there isn't a shift because nothing is changing. Macavity is still fooling them. The theme of the poem is the life lesson learned from the poem. In this poem there isn't much of a life lesson that is learned. This poem was more meant to entertain the reader rather than teach them an important life lesson. Macavity is a fast and sneaky cat who never gets caught.

27: The Road Not Taken The Road Not Taken TWO roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.

28: The poem "The Road Not Taken" is written by Robert Frost. This poem makes me feel a little sad because the poem tells the truth we are only one traveler so we can only take one, and never get to see the other. I like the part in the poem where he takes the grassier road because he is taking a chance on the less traveled road. The point of view of the speaker, the poet, is in first person. The speaker is in the action of the decision between the roads, and in the reflection by later telling the story. The poems' formal structure does have a rhyme scheme, has four stanzas, and has a meter. The plot of this story is to show a hard life choice, and how it can turn out. The words grassy and yellow wood help me paint a picture in my head of the setting of the poem. This poem's setting is in a yellow wood. This poem is about making a life choice. The conflict is the choice you have to make in a hard decision.

29: Mother to Son Well, son, I'll tell you: Life for me ain't been no crystal stair. It's had tacks in it, And splinters, And boards torn up, And places with no carpet on the floor— Bare. But all the time I'se been a-climbin' on, And reachin' landin's, And turnin' corners, And sometimes goin' in the dark Where there ain't been no light. So, boy, don't you turn back. Don't you set down on the steps. 'Cause you finds it's kinder hard. Don't you fall now— For I'se still goin', honey, I'se still climbin', And life for me ain't been no crystal stair. Langston Hughes

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