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Emily Dickinson

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S: Emily Dickinson Hopkins

BC: About the author | Kristin Hopkins was born in Owensboro, Kentucky on September 26, 1993. She has written many short stories and essays, but they have yet to be published. Once graduating, she plans to attend the University of Louisville with a major in psychology.

FC: Emily Dickinson | by Kristin Hopkins | #1 New York Times Bestseller! | This book is now a major motion picture!

1: For Stacey Payne, a most beloved English teacher.

2: Emily Dickinson was born December 10th, 1830 in Amherst, Massachusetts.

3: Emily was a bright student in school with a passion for reading and writing. She was eager to please, yet had to smuggle reading material into her house because of her father's strict rules. | Early Life

4: Education | Emily attended Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, but was withdrawn by her father due to illness.

5: Adult Life | Throughout her adult life, Emily became more and more secluded from society. She maintained close contact with a select few friends, but rarely left her family's house after her twenties. Emily was intelligent and was said to have a good sense of humor,yet was very awkward in social situations and viewed herself as childlike, often looking for guidance from others.

6: Societal Influences | During the Civil War, many of Emily's dear friends were killed in battle. This loss aroused her infatuation with death, which is made apparent in her poetry. Emily also refused to contribute to the war effort, despite her family's political involvement; this heightened her seclusion further.

7: Emily was raised with Calvinism, and the influence of other poets helped to bring out her own views of the world. ~Ralph Waldo Emerson ~Henry David Thoreau ~Charles Dickens ~John Ruskin | Inspirations

8: Emily died of Bright's disease at the early age of 55, thought by her doctor to have been caused by years of stress.

9: After her death, Emily's sister Vinnie found a box of over 1,700 poems and 200 letters written by Emily. Against the her sister's wishes, Vinnie did not burn her works, but gave them to a family friend to be typed and then later published.

10: Because I Could Not Stop For Death | Emily Dickinson

12: Because I could not stop for Death – He kindly stopped for me – The Carriage held but just Ourselves – And Immortality. We slowly drove – He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility – We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess – in the Ring – We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain – We passed the Setting Sun – Or rather – He passed us – The Dews drew quivering and chill – For only Gossamer, my Gown – My Tippet – only Tulle – We paused before a House that seemed A Swelling of the Ground – The Roof was scarcely visible – The Cornice – in the Ground – Since then – 'tis Centuries – and yet Feels shorter than the Day I first surmised the Horses' Heads Were toward Eternity –

14: Because I could not stop for Death – He kindly stopped for me – The Carriage held but just Ourselves – And Immortality. | Death stops to let the speaker pass, who is traveling with immortality.

16: We slowly drove – He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility – | The speaker continues on slowly with Death, leaving behind labor and leisure.

19: We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess – in the Ring – We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain – We passed the Setting Sun – | The speaker and Death are passing through life, observing the surroundings.

20: Or rather – He passed us – The Dews drew quivering and chill – For only Gossamer, my Gown – My Tippet – only Tulle – | Due to the thin material of her clothing, the speaker becomes chilled by the dew.

22: We paused before a House that seemed A Swelling of the Ground – The Roof was scarcely visible – The Cornice – in the Ground –

23: They pass by a house that seems to be only an extension of the ground.

25: Since then – 'tis Centuries – and yet Feels shorter than the Day I first surmised the Horses' Heads Were toward Eternity –

26: Themes | Mortality The speaker is describing the day of her death, and her attitude towards death is not one of fear.

27: Immortality The speaker is telling of her death from the afterlife. Since she is still living life after death, a sense of immortality is reached; death is only a transition, a step towards eternal life.

28: Speaker | The speaker is dead, and has been for some time. She thinks back on the day of her death almost fondly and in vivid detail; remembering everything the passed on the way and how she felt.

29: Tone | The poem's tone is one of calm acceptance and fond reminiscence. | Form | Iambic meter in quatrains

30: Metaphor | The carriage- The speaker and Death are traveling through the speaker's life in the carriage, which is a metaphor for our passage into death. The House- "We paused before a House that seemed A Swelling of the Ground" The 'house' is a metaphor for a grave, , the speaker's new home.

31: Alliteration | Recess – in the Ring Fields of Gazing Grain Setting Sun Gossamer, my Gown My Tippet – only Tulle

32: Personification | Death is portrayed as a man, a suitor to the speaker, and passing through the speaker's life is a date. All of his actions serve as a metaphor for what Dickinson believes death will be like. We slowly drove – He knew no haste And I had put away My labor and my leisure too, For His Civility –

33: Imagery | Dickinson uses imagery when describing the 'house,' the flashbacks to different stage of her life, and the horses heads pointing toward eternity. "We passed the School, where Children strove At Recess – in the Ring – We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain – We passed the Setting Sun "

34: Syntax | Dickinson has an Infuriating habit of capitalizing words that Need Not be capitalized to add Emphasis. I also feel that this was a well Plotted Strategy to Annoy grammar nazi students. Well played Emily, Well Played.

35: Never Let Me Go | Throughout Never Let Me Go, Kathy is reminiscing on her life and is preparing to move on to a new stage, much like how the speaker in Because I Could not Stop For Death passes through her life in the carriage ride, then enters Death

36: Awkwards, The. "Because I Could Not Stop For Death." 2010. From First To Last. "Emily." Dear Diary, My Teen Angst Has A Body Count. Epitaph, 2004. Kubicki, Jarosaw. 60550. Feb. 2009. Kubicki.info. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. Kubicki, Jarosaw. 60542. June 2008. Kubicki.info. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. Kubicki, Jarosaw. 60564. Feb. 2010. Kubicki.info. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. Kubicki, Jarosaw. 60587. Dec. 2011. Kubicki.info. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. | Special thanks to...

37: Lacombe, Eric. Femme Arbre. Designzzz. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. Lacombe, Eric. Q006. Designzzz. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. Lacombe, Eric. Sans titre 118. Designzzz. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. Pettinger, Tejvan. "Biography Emily Dickinson." Biography online. Oxford. 26 June 2006. Web. 22 Mar. 2012. Shmoop Editorial Team. "Because I could not stop for Death Analysis" Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. 22 Mar. 2012.

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