Christmas Standard Delivery Deadline 12/18
: :
Get up to 50% Off! Code: MXSHIP Ends: 12/12 Details
Apply
  1. Help

Planes, Trains & Autos

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

Planes, Trains & Autos - Page Text Content

BC: The End

FC: By Jake Ecker | The Semicolon

1: ;) | This is not correct

2: This is correct because the semicolon connects two independent clauses. | "The most distinguished professor at the University of Alabama won't make $5.9 million in his entire tenure in Tuscaloosa; Nick Saban will make that this year" (Wilbon).

3: This is incorrect because it includes a coordinating conjunction after the semicolon. Independent clauses belongs before and after a semicolon; they cannot start with "and." | "But you can have a seizure; and, if you're in very good shape like it seems Patterson was, it is possible to experience no neurological deficit and come out intact and even well, if it can be treated" (Johnson).

4: "The A's had to watch us celebrate on the field last year; they're not going to like that" (Caplan). | This is correct because it connects two related independent clauses, without a contraction directly after the semicolon.

5: "So, the equitable-application excuse for not paying athletes doesn't hold water; at the very least there's a level of hypocrisy here that ought to make the opponents of paying athletes uncomfortable" (Wilbon). | This is correct because it connects two related independent clauses.

6: "Paying players out of individual athletic department budgets is beyond impractical; it's probably not feasible" (Wilbon). | This is correct because it connects two related independent clauses.

7: "A great song has all the key elements — melody; emotion; a strong statement that becomes part of the lexicon; and great production" (Jay-Z). | This semicolon usage is not correct because they are being used to separate items in a list that was not started with a colon. A semicolon would be used if one or more of the items had parenthetic commas which described the items. If semicolons are to be used, the dash should be changed to a colon (Truss 120).

8: "Bird didn’t beat you with blazing speed or a sky-high vertical; he beat you with a high basketball IQ and a complete skill set" (Ferro). | This is correct because the semicolon connects two related independent clauses.

9: "No regular-season games will be missed; no preseason games will be missed" (Wilbon). | This usage is correct because the semicolon connects two related independent clauses without a coordinating conjunction.

10: "'The fervor in Aretha's voice demanded that respect; and more respect also involved sexual attention of the highest order'" (Wexler). | This is not right because the independent clause before the semicolon does not contain a comma, which would allow a coordinating conjunction to be placed directly after the semicolon (Straus).

11: "Richards is not a fancy guitarist; his style is a simple, personalized extension of his teenage ardor for Chuck Berry and the swarthy electricity of Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf" (100 Greatest Guitarists). | This semicolon usage is correct because it connects two independent clauses that relate to each other, without using a coordinating conjunction.

12: "NFL teams still make money; it's just that instead of $30-40 million a year in profit, they've been down recently to, say, $9-10 million" (Wilbon). | This sentence is grammatically correct because the semicolon separates two related independent clauses.

13: "Either way, if the Bulls are going to take that one step further it's not going to be a rookie who enables them; it'll be a veteran or two and almost certainly via trade(s)" (Wilbon). | This semicolon usage is correct because it connects two related independent clauses.

14: "And he's entering the first summer of his life when he isn't mostly adored; instead, he's entering a summer when suddenly some league officials wonder if he needs to consciously tend to his image, when his great potential no longer matters, but the increasing perception that he has underperformed relative to the all-time greats in his sport does" (Wilbon). | This semicolon usage is incorrect because the sentence begins with "and," which is grammatically incorrect. It is also a run-on sentence (which should be edited, but does not make the sentence incorrect).

15: "Dirk was 27 year old when he and the Mavericks lost to Miami in the 2006 Finals, 28 when he won the league MVP the next season; now it looks as if he's not going to retire as a bum" (Wilbon). | This semicolon is used correctly because it connects two related independent clauses.

16: "Series on; Miami not quite up to it" (Wilbon). | This is not grammatically correct because neither before nor after the semicolon is a full independent clause.

17: "Going 3-for-20 would have been struggling; 3-for-11 was closer to giving up" (Wilbon). | This semicolon use is correct because it connects two related independent clauses.

18: "The imperial weight, technical authority and exotic reach of Page's writing and playing on Zeppelin's eight studio albums have lost none of their power: the rusted, slow-death groan of Page's solo, played with a violin bow, in 'Dazed and Confused,' on Zeppelin's 1969 debut; the circular, cast-iron stammer of his riffing on 'Black Dog,' on the band's fourth LP; the melodic momentum and chrome-spear tone of his closing solo in Zeppelin's most popular song, 'Stairway to Heaven.'" (100 Greatest Guitarists). | This semicolon usage is correct because semicolons are used in a list Also, the items in the list have parenthetic commas, which modify the items in the list.

19: "There was certainly a lot of daredevilry in his flouting of standard tempos and harmonics; his records are breathtaking displays of melodic development and acute brawn" (100 Greatest Guitarists). | This semicolon usage is correct because it conects two related independent clauses.

20: This is gramatically incorrect because the independent clause after the semicolon begins with "because." The second independent clause is not a full sentence. The semicolon could be removed and the sentence would be grammatically correct. | "I feel sad for people who have to judge Jimi Hendrix on the basis of recordings and film alone; because in the flesh he was so extraordinary" (Townshend).

21: "Don't pay attention to the notes; White is not a clean soloist" (100 Greatest Guitarists). | This is correct because the semicolon links two different related independent clauses.

22: "It's haunting; he delivered every single song with such clarity that it gave me chills" (Keys). | This semicolon is used correctly because it bridges two related independent clauses.

23: "'A Change Is Gonna Come' is another song I covered; it's a great arrangement" (Van Morrison). | This semicolon usage is correct because the second independent clause explains the first independent clause. Also, there is no coordinating conjunction directly after the semicolon.

24: "An expression on Wade's face when Butler's name was broached, easily could have been interpreted as conflicted; the two are clearly friends, and Wade said he hates to see anybody, especially a buddy, sidelined by injury during something as career-defining as the NBA Finals" (Wilbon). | This semicolon use is correct because it connects two related independent clauses.

25: "Of course, Pippen is dead-on; it's not even debatable" (Wilbon). | This semicolon here is used correctly. It connects two related independent clauses.

26: "Klaus Voormann, one of the Beatles' artist buddies from their days in Hamburg, Germany, designed a striking photo-collage cover for Revolver; it was a crucial step on the road to the even trippier, more colorful imagery of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, which would come less than a year later" (500 Greatest Albums). | This semicolon usage is correct because it links two related independent clauses. Furthermore, both independent clauses contain parenthetical commas; therefore, a semicolon allows the sentence to avoid an abundance of commas.

27: "I sought shopping advice from three experts: Konstantinos Papamichael, a director of the California Lighting Technology Center at the University of California, Davis; Russell Leslie, a founder of the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy, N.Y.; and Craig A. Bernecker, the director of the Lighting Education Institute, in Philadelphia" (Tedeschi). | These semicolons are correctly used. They are used to separate items in a list in which the items each contain parenthetical commas.

28: "Typically, when the stock market surges, people feel wealthy, even if only on paper; when stocks plummet, people tend to close up their wallets" (Saha-Bubna). | This semicolon is used correctly because it is used to link sentences that contrast each other. There is no coordinating conjunction.

29: "Bird is one of the best all-around players to play the game; he is the only 20-10-5 player ever" (Ferro). | This semicolon usage is correct. The second independent clause explains the first independent clause.

30: "Songs like 'Paradise City' and 'Welcome to the Jungle' were just simple enough; the chorus lines came right when you wanted them" (Perry). | This semicolon is used correctly because both of the indepedent clauses are related. There is no coordinating conjunction.

31: "And his take on American soul music, on albums like Young Americans, was incredibly good; the original material he wrote was great" (Reed). | This semicolon is not grammatically correct because the sentence begins with "and." This eans that the first part of the sentence is not an independent clause.

32: "And their songs all had simple lyrics; that's the key" (Dr. John). | This semicolon is used incorrectly because the first part is not an independent clause.

33: "For a while he was my only reference point; I've covered his songs for years" (Beck). | This sentence is grammatically correct because the semicolon is used to separate two related independent clauses.

34: "At the same time, everything they did was really smart and worked on a few levels; you could love a particular song, then realize a year later that you had totally missed the meaning" (Flowers). | This sentence is grammatically correct because the two independent clauses are related and joined by the semicolon.

35: The semicolon here is grammatically correct and used effectively. In the flow of the sentence, the pause of the semicolon creates tension. It is effective in portraying the passion of the music the writer is talking about. | "There is this thing in them wound up so tight that they have to let it out, let that thing uncoil; it has to be released" (Flea).

36: "Obviously, he had great musicians on those albums: Bootsy Collins on the bass; Bernie Worrell, the best keyboard player I've ever heard" (Ice Cube). | Semicolons are used correctly in this example. They are used to separate items in a list initiated by a colon. An item in the list contains parenthetical commas, which make semicolons necessary to avoid too many commas.

37: "And Queen were always trying something new; none of their hit songs were paint-by-numbers" (Way). | This usage is incorrect because a sentence cannot start with "and." Of course, for stylistic purposes, writers occasionally do start sentences with "and," but for grammatical purposes, this is incorrect because there is only one independent clause.

38: "No one was just putting straight-out noise and atonal synthesizers into hip-hop, mixing elements of James Brown and Miles Davis; no one in hip-hop had ever been this hard, and perhaps no one has since" (Yauch). | This use of semicolon is correct because the semicolon separates two related independent clauses.

39: "Then, as time went on, Sly started using some more dissonant colors; he became like the Cézanne of funk" (Was). | The semicolon is used correctly because it separates two related independent clauses.

40: "Lennon was more than just a musician; he was more like a prophet" (Kravitz). | This example is grammatically correct because both of the independent clauses are related. There is no coordinating conjunction.

41: "Jay-Z often talks about ghostwriting for other artists; Prince is notorious for ghostwriting" (Thompson). | The usage here is correct because it separates two independent clauses. The semicolon almost acts as a "but," because it is used effectively.

Sizes: mini|medium|large|gargantuous
Default User
  • By: Jake E.
  • Joined: over 5 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 1
  • Anthony Gabriele
    • By: Anthony G.
    • Contributions: 0 photos , 0 pages

About This Mixbook

  • Title: Planes, Trains & Autos
  • Tags: None
  • Published: over 5 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order