Enjoy up to 55% Off! Code: JOLLY Ends: 12/5 Details
Apply
  1. Help

Fiji

Hello, you either have JavaScript turned off or an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.

Fiji - Page Text Content

FC: FIJI

1: Welcome to Fiji

2: These homes usually belong to Fiji's urban squatter areas or for people who are looking for work in the area. There is no electricity and has no access to utilities.

3: These Western-style homes are usually found in rural areas. There usually made out of tin, cement or wood which protects it more from outside elements.

4: Letter | Dear Dad and Mom, I've been really enjoying my life in Fiji so far. I really miss you guys and its only been a couple of weeks. I've seen a lot of what the life of my Fijians are like. I visited homes in different areas of Fiji. One of the first areas I visited was in the urban parts. The homes in this area are in poor condition. There made out of tin and look like shacks. They have no electricity and have little no protection from the outside elements. These homes have about one room that is shared between a family. Some bigger families have a hard time living in such a small area. Another area I visited was in Suva. The homes in these areas are more modern than the other homes. They have a western-style. There made out of cements or wood so they can hold up stronger to outside elements. They have more rooms so theres more room for families. These homes are becoming more popular but some families can't afford them. I wanna make sure that every family in Fiji can afford one of these homes instead of living in the tin shacks. I'll keep in touch and tell you some of the places I'll be visiting. Love, Katie

5: This is the Municipal Market which is located in Suva. . This is how the people of Fiji do there everyday food shopping

6: Letter | Dear Mom and Dad, I know i haven't written in a while but I've busy! The life in Fiji isn't as fast paced as it is in America. The other day I visited the local market. A lot of people are farmers and there is a lot of people who sell there crops at these markets. Some of the food included bananas, rice, taro, cassava, pineapples, and coconuts. All of the food sold there was grown by the locals around that city. There isn't a lot of processed food sold or eaten there. The diet of Fijians are boiled taro and cassava, vegetables and there dishes are prepared in coconut milk. The meat is rarely deep-fried but rather boiled or roasted. So I've been eating pretty healthy since I've been here which isn't a bad thing. I really enjoy comparing our culture to the Fijian's culture. There culture is very relaxed and casual. A lot of people around here call it " The Pacific Way." I'll be witting to you guys soon, I promise. Love, Katie

7: Since most Fiji women do not have careers outside the household these women sell handicrafts.

8: In the background it shows some modern buildings for Fiji in Suva. The population is about 200,000 for Suva

9: Students are walking home from school in their uniform which consists of a white shirt, a tie, sandals, and a blue tailored sulu. Students tend to wear a more conservation clothing.

10: Some girls all dressed in white are walking home from just attending a Methodist church service. People usually wear more conservative clothing when going to church.

11: Letter Dear Mom and Dad, I've been in Fiji for a couple of months now and I truly love it here. The people here are the nicest people you will ever meet. I've been walking around the local towns and I talked to some cool people. They are welcoming to everyone they talk to. I talked to some school kids and they wear more conservative clothes then what they wear in America. Even though they wear uniforms outside of school they wear clothes differently. Also when they attend church, they dress up in all white and look there best. People are very religious in Fiji. Most Fijians are Christian and there religion plays a big role in their lives. I never want to leave but i miss you guys too much to stay here. I'll be coming home soon! See you soon. Love, Katie

12: Bowai Club This artifact was used in Fiji in he 19th century. They were used for carving to make other tools.

13: Fijians Chief House This was occupied by the most prominent position in a traditional Fijian village

14: Fiji Mermaid This is a well preserved specimen of half mummified mermaid was acquired through the local government in 1868 AD found in Fiji

15: Fiji Money This artifact consist of a 5, 10, and 20 doillar bill. This is used in everyday life of Fijians

16: Whale Tooth Money Known as "Taboo" which was used for marriage centuries ago. A youth seeking a wife would offer the women the tooth.

17: Crackdown on phony dealers "In that letter, we will outline a methodology that we will adopt to deal with this issue." This ad"The new rate will lower costs for individuals and companies, enabling an increase in overall telephony penetration among Fijians," said Attorney-General and Minister for Industry & Trade Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum in a statement. "This effort is a part of the Bainimarama Government's goal of empowering Fijians through technology, helping to build a knowledge-based society." As a result of the change, there will be increased funding available to set up more of Fiji's new free telecentres launched in October. But whether the retail charges, what you pay when you make a call, will be reduced is yet to be known. None of the operators were ready to comment on this issue yesterday.ditional revenue can be used to build new network infrastructure and also maintain existing infrastructure," the commission said. In addition, the commission had also increased the international call terminating rate by nine cents a minute- from 30c a minute to 39c a minute. It had also increased the ICT levy from three cents a minute to six cents a minute and expects to earn an estimated $8million from this levy. The effect of this would vary among the telecommunication operators. For example, FINTEL with no network of its own will earn 39 cents from the new interconnection (international) rates. But it would have to pay 13 cents local interconnecting rates (connecting the calls to the other operators), nine cents handling fee and six cents as ICT levy. Its profit would be 11 cents. Under the old rates, it made a profit of 10 cents- international interconnecting rate was 30 cents but it paid 17 cents as local interconnection rate, 3 cents as ICT levy. The other telecommunication operators stand to receive an extra nine cents because of the new handling levy. But if the calls are terminated in their own network, that is if Digicel (which brings in international calls) connects calls to its own network, it saves 13 cents. In essence, the major outcome of the decision is the increase to government coffers. The international call traffic to Fiji is estimated at eight to 10million minutes a month. In the last 10 months, the commission has collected $3m from the 3 cents a minute fee charged for each international call coming into the country. However, there are operators in the country who have been able to beat the system by utilising technologies such as SIM Boxing where international calls are portrayed as local calls. The commission's rules in February included- a monthly meeting with the commission where companies must submit details of the companies they connect calls for and the minutes connected. They should also have bank accounts for the international call revenue and the bank statements to be available to the commission. In addition, all international calls must have caller IDs to prevent SIM boxing (use of technology to portray international calls as local calls). In its latest determination, the net has become wider. The commission has imposed a 9 cents levy as handling fee for those that connect international calls. Not all telecommunication operators in the country bring in international call traffic. The new levy will be paid to network operators who receive the calls. For example, if FINTEL brings in a call and connects it to Vodafone, it will have to pay Vodafone 9 cents.Elenoa Baselala (Wednesday, November 09, 2011) WHILE the government coffers should expect another $5million from the increase in international calls coming into the country, the Commerce Commission's chase of rogue dealers is far from over. In February this year, the commission laid a number of strict conditions as it realised that there were some operators who were connecting calls into the country at a rate cheaper than the regulated price of 30 cents a minute. "Later, this week we will formally write to all stakeholders in the industry to allocate technical staff with whom the commission can work with to identify the rogue elements in the industry who would attempt to undercut the rates set by the commission thus depriving the country millions of dollars of foreign exchange.

18: Floods cut off thousands Mary Rauto (Monday, November 21, 2011) Public Works Department staff from Vunidawa at the Naivucini bridge. Picture: ATU RASEA ROAD transportation to villages, power station and a hydro dam has been cut off after flood waters damaged their link to Suva - a bridge. On Saturday morning, four trucks with root crops and vegetables to be sold at Nausori and Suva markets were stuck on the Wailoa end of the Naivucini Bridge. The bridge is the only link for farmers in eight villages in Wailoa and Monasavu areas, one secondary school, four primary schools, the Wailoa power station and the Monasavu dam. The only alternative route for those affected would be a a five-hour drive to Tavua. Villagers of Naivucini helped people going to the market by carrying their cargo or transporting it on horseback across the flooded Wailase River. Naivucini villager Tui Tadeo said part of the bridge gave way on Friday night, at the height of heavy rain. At the Naivucini end, another mode of transportation had to be arranged to take the farmers and their vegetation to the markets. He said of the farmers from Wailoa and Monasavu heading back from the market on Saturday spent the night at Naivucini before crossing the river on foot yesterday. Naivucini Turaga ni koro Ananaisa Koroibete said this was the third time that the bridge was damaged. Speaking in Fijian, he said damage to Naivucini this time was not as bad as during cyclones Kina and Thomas. Mr Koroibete said there was a need to elevate the bridge. He said as long as there were culverts, the bridge would also be damaged during floods and cyclones because as trees and logs rushed down the Wailase River and got caught in the Naivucini Bridge, the flow of water would be blocked. Mr Koroibete said as a result the flood waters would look for the fastest part of the bridge, damaging it.

19: Papaya boost for Fiji Felix Chaudhary (Thursday, November 10, 2011) THERE "This is a major achievement for Fiji's trade in papaya with Australia market. Currently our papaya export to Australia is increasing significantly with total exports to date for 2011 at 644 tonnes with 85 per cent of exports going to the Australian market. This is a marked difference to 2010 when exports to Australia made up only 30 per cent of total exports. There is potential to export 2000 tonnes per year as the popularity of red papaya grows." Mr Silvestrini said BAF would like to see the papaya exports to Australia sustained and further increased and as such would do everything possible to help the industry. Biosecurity Australia has also agreed to allow papaya to be shipped into Australia in newspaper packaging. Fiji is exporting papaya to New Zealand under these conditions and this provides a further option to exporters to protect the fruit. Mr Silvestrini said the use of recycled newspaper would reduce the cost of packaging compared to foam packing. This is a saving for exporters and has the added advantage of being a more environmentally friendly option. Agriculture permanent secretary Colonel Mason Smith said the meeting was crucial given the importance of biosecurity in facilitating agricultural trade between countries. He said Fiji regarded Australia as a primary market for agricultural produce. And added that with additional meetings, more of Fiji's agricultural products could gain and maintain access to markets in Australia, PHAMA's efforts in helping developing countries like Fiji address market access issues was also acknowledged by the permanent secretary. has been a major breakthrough for papaya producers and exporters following an agreement yesterday that allows Fiji red papaya to be transported as loose cargo on Boeing 737 aircraft. The deal brokered between Biosecurity Fiji and Australia was achieved after a Bilateral Quarantine Meeting at the Novotel on Monday. Representatives from the Biosecurity Authority of Fiji, Biosecurity Australia and the Department of Agriculture and Pacific Horticultural and Agricultural Market Access (PHAMA) met and discussed the issue at length, with the Fiji contingent highlighting the success of the country's control methods in preventing pests from entering Australia over the last seven years as proof that papaya could be exported as loose cargo without risk. BAF chief executive officer Elvis Silvestrini said the agreement was good news for the booming papaya industry. He said the industry was concerned about how it would export papaya to Australia in 737 aircraft as these aircraft did not have provisions for LD containers which was one of the import requirements under our Bilateral Quarantine Agreement (BQA) for papaya exports - to ensure pests are not able to enter containers in transit. "I am pleased to say that Biosecurity Australia agreed to our request to have the papaya shipped to Australia as loose cargo, provided we have sound trace back integrity for each consignment and appropriate measures are taken to prevent re-infestation and we'll work with the industry on that," he said. Mr Silvestrini said the breakthrough with his Australian counterparts come as papaya exports for 2011 reached 644 tonnes with 85 per cent going to the Australian market alone.

20: Death alarm Avinesh Gopal (Thursday, November 03, 2011) THE Ministry of Health has asked the Ministry of Finance for an increased 2012 Budget allocation to address the growing threat of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the country. Health permanent secretary Dr Salanieta Saketa said more than 80 per cent of deaths in the country were caused by NCDs, which had been declared a global crisis by the United Nations, affecting the livelihoods of families and national economies. Dr Saketa said her ministry received $400,000 in the 2011 Budget for NCDs "and we are looking at an additional $500,000 for next year". She said the Health Ministry was given a budgetary allocation of about $140 million this year and she was hoping for an increase in the 2012 Budget. "More than 80 per cent of the deaths in the country every year are due to NCDs," she said. "There is a 60 per cent prevalence of diabetes in the population and 90 per cent prevalence of hypertension." Dr Saketa said one in eight people in the country had diabetes, saying this statistic was alarming and a cause for concern for the health authorities. The Fiji Council of Social Services, while congratulating the ministry for launching November as the NCD awareness month, asked it to pressure the Finance Ministry for more funding to address the problem of low life expectancy caused by NCDs, which experts have warned will lead to the loss of millions of dollars and reduce the country's workforce. In a letter to Dr Saketa, FCOSS executive director Hassan Khan said the greater monetary allocation for the prevention of NCDs should come out of the funds derived from Value Added Tax. Mr Khan said the Reserve Bank of Fiji's quarterly review in June reported that "in the first six months of this year, net VAT collections increased annually by 37.5 per cent due largely to the January 2011 VAT rate increase". "It must be remembered that the sole purpose of the introduction of VAT has been to make more funds available for social development and health is the key component of social justice," he said in the letter. "This would ensure a renewed national effort in the fight against poverty and ill-health." Mr Khan said the NCD awareness month is a critical opportunity to reverse the NCD epidemic. "We believe that the greater allocation of funds out of VAT and the higher taxes on alcohol and tobacco could greatly assist this aim and we urge you and your ministry to call on the Ministry of Finance to support this initiative of your ministry." Mr Khan urged all civil society organisations to support the efforts of the Health Ministry. He also urged people to take control of their own health, saying that NCDs were a significant driver of economic loss and instability.

21: Survey notes a growing trend in inhalant abuse cases Maneesha Karan (Thursday, November 10, 2011) A group of teachers who participated at a drug and substance abuse workshop held at Ro Qomate House in Labasa yesterday. Picture: MANEESHA KARAN INHALANT abuse is becoming a notable trend in student drug and substance abuse cases. This, despite a 24 per cent reduction in the cases reported in both primary and secondary schools last year. The National Substance Abuse Advisory Council (NSAAC) education officer, Talica Malani, revealed this at a training of trainers workshop on drugs and substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, and school drugs policy review consultation held at Ro Qomate House in Labasa yesterday. According to a research by NSAAC last year, 23 per cent of students had sniffed glue and benzene out of a total sample of 2147 students. "Inhalant abuse, for example sniffing glue and benzene among young school students has become a major worry for parents and schools," Mrs Malani said "This is a growing trend among school students despite an overall decline in the percentage of drugs and substance abuse among the schooling population," she said. According to a School Management Information System (SIMS Data), the total number of drug and substance abuse cases reported by schools dropped from 526 cases in 2009 to 399 cases in 2010. "Compared to the past five years, there has been a positive change in the trend of substance abuse among school students whereby there has been a decrease of substance use," Mrs Malani said. Out of the total sample number of 2147 students in 2004, 69 per cent had tried kava, 51 per cent alcohol, 43 per cent cigarettes or any other tobacco products and 13 per cent marijuana. In 2010, out of a sample of 2147 students, the overall proportions on substance use were 53 per cent kava, 38 per cent alcohol, 36 per cent tobacco, 23 per cent glue and benzene, 3 per cent rubber smoke, and 5 per cent marijuana. The drop in reported cases, she said was the result of vigorous awareness campaigns with various government departments, the police drug unit, non-governmental organisations and religious groups to create an impact on student behaviour. However, she added children needed to be closely monitored by parents and advised on the harmful effects of drugs on a person's health. "Parents need to spend more quality time with their children rather than spending too much time in various social activities, which requires them to be absent from their homes. "There is a need for parents to instill greater sense of discipline in their children," Mrs Malani said. "But more work needs to be done and we continue to seek the assistance of various stakeholders to intensify the awareness campaign in future. We need the support of the churches because we believe the spiritual teaching is a powerful tool in drugs and substance abuse prevention."

22: Constitution (1990) PRINT THIS DOCUMENT EMAIL THIS DOCUMENT CITE THIS DOCUMENT Countries OVERVIEW GEOGRAPHY HISTORY & ISSUES SOCIETY & CULTURE GOVERNMENT & ECONOMY GOVERNMENT POLITICS FACTS & FIGURES ARTICLES MEDIA, VISUALS, MAPS, & FLAGS The following is the text of Fiji's older constitution, which came into effect on July 25, 1990. This document—which allows only indigenous Fijians to serve as members of Fiji's Cabinet—has been superseded by the nation's newest Constitution (1997), which mandates that some ethnic Indians (Fiji's largest minority group) and other minorities must be included in all future governments. THE CONSTITUTION OF THE SOVEREIGN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF FIJI. Chapter I. THE STATE AND CONSTITUTION. Sections 1-3. Fiji is a sovereign democratic republic. The laws of the Constitution are supreme, replacing all other laws that are inconsistent with it. This Constitution recognizes the Bose Levu Vakaturaga, or Council of Rotuma. CHAPTER II. PROTECTION OF FUNDAMENTAL RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS OF THE INDIVIDUAL. Sections 4-20. Every person in Fiji is entitled to fundamental rights, such as life, liberty, and security; freedom of conscience, of expression, and of assembly; and protection of the privacy of the home. The right to life is protected save in cases of a criminal offense or court conviction. The taking of life is justifiable in cases of defense, in the course of an arrest, or during suppression of a riot or mutiny. The right to personal liberty may be withdrawn based on a criminal offense or court order, for the purpose of preventing the spread of disease, or in the case of someone of unsound mind who poses a threat to the community. Any person arrested or detained has the right to know the reasons for such incarceration and the right to legal help. No person shall be held in slavery or be subject to forced labor. Forced labor does not include labor imposed by court order; labor required of a member of a disciplined force, such as in the military; or labor required during a period of public emergency. No person shall be subject to torture. Property may be taken by authority of a High Court order in the interests of defense or public safety or during a public emergency, in which cases compensation will be provided. The state may acquire property of national or archaeological significance. The privacy of the home is protected except in such cases where warranted in the interests of defense or public safety. Every person charged with a criminal offense is presumed innocent until proven guilty. There shall be no law that is discriminatory on the basis of race, sex, or creed. Persons detained under emergency laws are protected by certain laws that allow them recourse to legal help and to a reasonable explanation for their detention. Persons may apply to the High Court for redress in cases where constitutional provisions were not applied to them.

23: CHAPTER III. FIJIAN AND ROTUMAN INTERESTS. Section 21. Parliament is charged with protecting the economic, social, educational, cultural, and traditional interests of native Fijians and Rotumans. The government may give directions to assist Fijians in business or other endeavors. CHAPTER IV. CITIZENSHIP. Sections 22-30. Persons who were citizens on Oct 6, 1987 shall remain citizens. Citizenship is acquired by birth, descent, naturalization, or registration. Persons born in Fiji after Oct 6, 1987 become citizens if their mother or father was a citizen. Persons born outside Fiji after Oct 6, 1987 become citizens if their father was a citizen of Fiji. CHAPTER V. THE PRESIDENT. Sections 31-38. The president and commander in chief is appointed by the Council of Rotuma to a term of five years. The president appoints a council for advice on national matters of importance. The Council of Rotuma also chooses an acting president to fill in for the president in case of an emergency or absence. Oaths must be taken by the president. The president may be removed for misconduct on the judgment of the prime minister and a chief justice, in which case a tribunal is formed to investigate the charges of misconduct. CHAPTER VI. PARLIAMENT (Sections 39-81). Part I. Composition of Parliament. Parliament consists of the president, a House of Representatives, and a Senate. Part 2. The House of Representatives. There are 70 members of the House of Representatives elected to represent constituencies. Voters are divided into four groups: Fijians, Indians, Rotumans, and those neither Fijian, Rotuman, nor Indian. Fijians elect 37 members; Indians elect 27; Rotumans elect one member; and the fourth group elects five members. The House selects a speaker and deputy speaker from qualified people from outside the House. A special commission decides the boundaries of constituencies and the number of members taken from each province. Voters must be citizens of at least 21 years of age. There are provisions for an electoral commission and a supervisor of elections. Part 3. The Senate. The Senate contains 34 members appointed by the president: 24 Fijians, one Rotuman, and nine members from other communities. Senate terms last four years. The Senate elects from among its members a president and vice president. Part 4. Powers and Procedure. Parliament may make laws for the good government of Fiji. Bills may be proposed from either the House or the Senate. A bill from the House is sent to the Senate and then to the president for approval. The official language of Parliament is English but Fijian or Hindustani may also be spoken. A quorum of the House consists of 24 members and a quorum in the Senate consists of 12 members. All questions proposed for decision must be determined by a majority of votes. The attorney general may attend proceedings in either house but may not cast a vote. Both houses are excluded from proposing bills that call for the imposition or alteration of taxation or otherwise dip into national funds. The Senate is limited in its powers with respect to appropriation and money bills. Parliament may alter the Constitution in limited ways. Part 5. Sessions, Prorogation, and Dissolution.

24: Part 1. The Application of Laws. Parliament may apply customary laws. Fijian customary law has effect as part of the laws of Fiji. The Native Lands Commission has final say over matters relating to customs, traditions, and disputes. Part 2. The Courts. There is a High Court, a Court of Appeal, and a Supreme Court, which is the final appellate court. Part 3. The Judiciary. The High Court consists of a chief justice and not more than eight lesser judges, all of whom are appointed by the president on the advice of the Cabinet. The Court of Appeal consists of a president of the court and lesser judges, including those of the High Court. The chief justice acts as the president of the Supreme Court, which combines other presidentially appointed justices and the justices of appeal. Part 4. Jurisdiction. The High Court has original jurisdiction over all civil and criminal proceedings and may supervise the proceedings of lower courts. It may hear and determine appeals as well. The Court of Appeal hears questions of the interpretation of the Constitution. The Supreme Court hears cases appealed at the Court of Appeal and hears civil cases involving large sums of money. Its decisions are final. Part 5. Fijian Courts. Parliament makes provisions for the establishment of lesser Fijian courts. CHAPTER IX. SERVICE COMMISSIONS AND THE PUBLIC SERVICE. Sections 123-133. There is a Judicial and Legal Services Commission consisting of the chief justice, a public services chairperson, and two other members appointed by the president. The president may appoint representatives of Fiji abroad. The Police Service Commission consists of a chairperson and two other members appointed by the president. It has the power to appoint and dismiss members of the police force. CHAPTER X. THE OMBUDSMAN. Sections 134-140. The ombudsman is appointed by the president to a term of four years. The ombudsman has the power to investigate administrative authorities or public officers in cases of malfeasance or by invitation of the government. CHAPTER XI. FINANCE. Sections 141-148. All revenue raised by the government is paid into the Consolidated Fund, from which money is withdrawn to meet expenditures or other expenses authorized by law. Expenditures are approved by Parliament in the form of appropriations bills. A Contingencies Fund may be created for unforeseen emergencies. Salaries of certain officers are charged to the Consolidated Fund, as is Fiji's public debt. An auditor general supervises all public Fijian accounts and audits and reports on them. CHAPTER XII. MISCELLANEOUS. Sections 149-161. In this chapter various terms are defined and interpreted, such as the "Bose Levu Vakaturaga," which means the Great Council of Chiefs. There are provisions for removal from office, resignations, and the functions of commissions and tribunals. CHAPTER XIII. SPECIAL POWERS AGAINST SUBVERSION AND EMERGENCY POWERS. Sections 162-163. The Parliament may enact special laws to stop actions deemed dangerous to Fiji. The president may issue a Proclamation of Emergency when the security or economy of Fiji is threatened. CHAPTER XIV. IMMUNITY PROVISIONS. Section 164. The leader of the May 1987 coup is immune from prosecution. All members of the military, police, and prison services who showed allegiance to him are likewise immune from prosecution. CHAPTER XV. TRANSITIONAL PROVISIONS. Sections 165-168. Existing public officers may hold on to their posts after the promulgation of the Constitution. All property previously vested in Her Majesty is vested in the state. Existing laws and regulations will persist until modified by the dictates of the Constitution.

25: Fiji: National Anthem The national anthem of Fiji was adopted after independence in 1970. Michael Francis Alexander Prescott wrote the lyrics and adopted its melody from a 1911 hymn, "Dwelling in Beulah Land," by Charles Austin Miles. God Bless Fiji Blessing grant, oh God of nations, on the isles of Fiji, As we stand united under noble banner blue. And we honor and defend the cause of freedom ever, Onward march together, God bless Fiji! Chorus For Fiji, ever Fiji, let our voices ring with pride, For Fiji, ever Fiji, her name hail far and wide, A land of freedom, hope and glory to endure whate'er befall. May God bless Fiji, forevermore! Blessing grant, oh God of nations, on the isles of Fiji, Shores of golden sand and sunshine, happiness and song. Stand united, we of Fiji, fame and glory ever, Onward march together, God bless Fiji!

26: Works Consulted 1) Banana Stands. 2006. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo helps inform my research by showing the food market in Fiji. In the photo it shows the food market in Fiji. It's outside and there's a lot of venders selling the same product. 2)Baselala, Elenona. "Crackdown on phony dealers." Fiji Times Online 9 Nov. 2011 n. pag. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Web. 10 Nov. 2011. . I found this website on the school library page under the Peace Corps Project section. The author is a reliable source because he has written many other articles found in this newspaper. His work must be accurate if he is a writer for this newspaper. This source informs me with my research because it discusses some of the daily news that is occurring in Fiji. It helps me get a better understanding of the business about business. 3)Bowai Club, Fiji. 19 Mar. 2009. Flickr. Yahoo, n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. . I found this website on the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. There is no specific author for this artifact. This is important for my research of Fiji because its an artifact that was used in Fiji in the 19th century. They were used for carving for different tools. 4)Chaud, Felix. "Water Jobs to Go." The Fiji Times Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2011. . I found this website on the school library page under the Peace Corps Project section. The author is a reliable source because he has written many other articles found in this newspaper. His work must be accurate if he is a writer for this newspaper. This article is helpful for my research because it's a local news article for Fiji. 5)Chaudhary, Felix. "Papaya boost for Fiji." Fiji Times Online 10 Nov. 2011: n. pag. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Web. 10 Nov. 2011. . I found this website on the school library page under the Peace Corps Project section. The author is a reliable source because he has written many other articles found in this newspaper. His work must be accurate if he is a writer for this newspaper. This source informs me with my research because it discusses Fiji's trade within the country.

27: 6)Fiji. "Constitution." World Geography. World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC Clio, 190. Web. 11 Nov. 2011. . I found this document on a website found on the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I found it on ABC Clio World Geography under Fiji. It doesn't have a specific author for this document. This source is helpful for my research because its the Constitution for Fiji and it gives information about the rights of the people living in Fiji. 7)Fiji artifact- 5 dollars. 12 Mar. 2009. Flickr. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Nov. 2011. . I found this artifact on a website that we were told to use for our project on the school library page. There was no specific author for this artifact. This artifact is helpful for my research because it's Fiji money. Its an artifact that is used very often in their culture since its money. 8)Fiji Island: Whale Tooth Money. 2009. Flickr. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. . I found this website on the school library page under the Peace Corps Project section. There is no specific author for this artwork. This artifact is helpful for my knowledge of Fiji because it tells an old myth about the whale teeth and what they were used for. 9)"Fiji: National Anthem." ABC-CLIO eBook Collection. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. . 10)Going Home. 2006. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This picture is important for my research because it shows some male students returning home from school. All of them are wearing uniforms which includes sandals, nice shirt and long skirt. These articles of clothing usually aren't worn everyday for school. 11)Gopal, Avinesh. "Death Alarm." Fiji Times Online 3 Nov. 2011: n. pag. Grolier Online Atlas. Web. 3 Nov. 2011. . I found this website off of the Springfield Library Page under the Peace Corps Project. This website is helpful for my research. It shows the daily news for my country which is Fiji. It gives local information so i can better understand my country

28: 12) Homes in Jilttu. 2006. Collection of CulturalGrams. ProQuest, n.d. Web. 7 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo helps inform me for my research because its shows some of the poor living conditions that some Fijians live in. The houses are made out of low quality materials and some of the houses have holes in them. They look like single room homes. Also there is a lot of trash on the outside of the houses. 13)Jittu Squatter. 2006. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 7 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo is helpful to my research because it also shows the living conditions of some of Fijians. One of the houses doesn't have a proper front door. It looks like a shed. They are single floored homes and not very fancy. 14)Karan, Maneesh. "Survey notes a growing trend in inhalant abuse cases." Fiji Times Online 10 Nov. 2011: n. pag. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. Web. 10 Nov. 2011. . I found this website on the school library page under the Peace Corps Project section. The author is a reliable source because he has written many other articles found in this newspaper. His work must be accurate if he is a writer for this newspaper. This source informs me with my research because it discusses some of the daily news that is occurring in Fiji. It helps me get a better understanding of my country. 15)Municipal Market. 2006. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo is helpful for my research. In the photo it shows a regular farmer's marker. The conditions of the market are different than the ones in America.

29: 16) On the Queen's Road. 2006. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo is helpful for my research. This photo shows a house that fijians live in. This house has a more quality than most of the other homes. Its a single home without any other houses surrounding it. It's made out of a more high quality than the other houses. 17)Rural Home. 2006. Collection of CulturalGrams. Pro Quest, 2011. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo is helpful for my research. It shows a house in the rural area. Its a lot nicer than some of the other homes. These homes are becoming more common in poorer areas of FIji. 18)Suva Handicrafts. 2006. Collection of CulturalGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corp Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo is helpful for my research of Fiji. The photo shows some Fiji women working on handicrafts in town. This is how alot of women provide for there families. They mostly are house wives so they need to find a way to make extra money for there families. This is one of those ways that they are able to do this. 19)Vale Levu- Fiji Chielf's House . 14 Sept. 2009. Flickr. Yahoo, n.d. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. . I found this website under the Peace Corps Project on the school library page. There is no specific author for this photo. This helpful for my research of Fiji because its a from the tradition Fiji village. It gives information of what Fiji used to be like many centuries ago.

30: 20)Victoria Parade. 2006. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corps Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo is helpful for my project because it shows one of the main streets in Fiji. In the picture you can see how it looks older than most other countries. The cars look like they are older models. 21)Yamada, Takeshi. Fiji Mermaid. 1868 A.D. Museum of World Wonders, Japan. Flickr. Web. 14 Nov. 2011. . I found this site on the school library under the Peace Corps Project. There was no specific author for this artifact. This is helpful for my research because it is a legend for my country which is Fiji. Its gives some information on the culture of Fiji. 22)Young Fiji-Indians. 2006. Collection of CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 14 Oct. 2011. . I found this source from the school library page under the Peace Corp Project. I clicked on Culture Grams and typed in my country Fiji. There wasn't a specific author for this photo. This photo is helpful for my research of Fiji. This photo shows some of the local Fiji-Indians hanging around the town. They seem to be wearing simple clothes and not really stylish or expensive clothes. They seem to be enjoying themselves just hanging out. The teens in Fiji and America are clearly different.

Sizes: mini|medium|large|gargantuous
Default User
  • By: Katie M.
  • Joined: about 6 years ago
  • Published Mixbooks: 1
No contributors

About This Mixbook

  • Title: Fiji
  • Tags: None
  • Published: about 5 years ago

Get up to 50% off
Your first order

Get up to 50% off
Your first order