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Guatemala

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Guatemala - Page Text Content

FC: GUATEMALA | Robert Christoph

1: A festively painted bus in Guatemala is familiarly called a “chicken bus,” as locals often bring their chickens along (chickens ride for free). The buses are cheap to ride, are often crowded, and can be somewhat dangerous on mountainous roads. Most of the buses are old U.S. buses that no longer pass vehicle inspections. Buses provide the main form of long-distance travel. | The giant kites of Guatemala, or barriletes gigantes, are in Sumpango a labor of the plight of the Indians. The tradition can be tracked to the end of the 1400s, when they made and flew their kites to honor their ancestors and rid the area of evil spirits on All Saints’ Day. They now create and fly their kites to show pride in their Mayan Indian heritage and send a quiet protest to the government that regulates and neglects Indian culture, as the government imposes barriers on Indian language, religious practice, and tradition. | Images

2: A girl sells vegetables in Guatemala City. In poorer families, children must work as soon as they can help support the family. This is one of the few ways that this girl can make enough money to survive. | Young workers harvest corn. Corn is a staple, particularly for indigenous Guatemalans. It is cooked in countless different ways and appears in a variety of dishes. Corn tortillas or tamalitos are eaten with nearly every meal.

3: This horse-drawn cart fits right in with the colonial architecture of Antigua. Contrasts between old and the new abound in Antigua, one of the best preserved colonial cities in Central America. Horse-drawn carriages for hire share the road with modern vehicles, while internet cafés may be located in colonial buildings that are hundreds of years old.

4: Poverty in Guatemala is widespread and deeply entrenched, particularly among Poor rural people, who account for 71 per cent of the country’s poor population. The country's high rates of illiteracy, infant mortality and infant malnourishment are even higher among indigenous peoples, most of whom live in rural areas. Poverty affects mainly young people and people living in rural areas, and it is highly concentrated among indigenous communities and households headed by women. | An entire neighborhood turns out to celebrate the graduation of a student in the town of San Pedro la Laguna, located on the shore of Lago de Atitlán. Her family set up a stage and hired musicians, who play into the early hours of the morning. Guests enjoy eating tamales during the street celebration.

5: When the Spanish conquistadors claimed areas of Central America and Mexico in the sixteenth century, they discovered the ruins of a great civilization, that of the Mayans, who had vanished and left evidence of their lost grandeur in massive structures that had been over-whelmed by the surrounding rain forest. Ruins in the Guatemalan highlands include Copán, a typical Mayan center with plazas, pyramids, a court for ball games, and blocks of stone inscribed with hieroglyphics. Tikal, another Mayan center in Guatemala, had more than 3,000 structures in a six-square-mile area. Vast palaces with hundreds of rooms, rows and rows of wooden huts, and increasingly larger buildings approaching the center of Tikal accommodated a surrounding community that may have numbered as many as 90,000 people. These ruins show just how important maintaining culture is to the people of Guatemala.

6: Artifacts

8: Letters

9: Documents

10: News Clippings

12: News Clippings Continued

13: Works Cited | “Amnesty says Guatemala must act on killing of women.” BBC News. British Broadcasting Service, 7 Mar. 2011. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . BBC News. British Broadcasting Service, 30 Mar. 2011. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . BIFACIAL BLADE. N.d. World Museum of Man. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . This is an obsidian blade, made by the Mayans. “CENTIPEDE” ECCENTRIC. N.d. World Museum of Man. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . This is a black obsidian carving believed to be a centipede. Countryside Crops. 2007. CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2001. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. . A girl sells vegetables in Guatemala City. In poorer families, children must work as soon as they can help support the family. This is one of the few ways that this girl can make enough money to survive. “Daily shootings keep Guatemala’s paramedics busy.” BBC News. BBC, 12 Feb. 2011. Web. 23 Mar. 2011. . DRILLED GORGET PENDANTS. N.d. World Museum of Man. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . These are pieces of jewelry, probably from a necklace. They are carved from obsidian. ECCENTRIC. N.d. World Museum of Man. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . This is a flint carving. It is shaped in a way that it resembles coral. Graduation Celebration. 2008. CultureGrams. ProQuest, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. . An entire neighborhood turns out to celebrate the graduation of a student in the town of San Pedro la Laguna, located on the shore of Lago de Atitlán. Her family set up a stage and hired musicians, who play into the early hours of the morning. Guests enjoy eating tamales during the street celebration. “Guatemala: National Anthem.” World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . The national anthem of Guatemala was written during a national competition in 1887. The composer of the music, Rafael Alvarez Ovalle, was honored for his work, but honor for the lyricist did not come until 1911 because Cuban poet José Joaquín Palma had submitted his work anonymously. The lyrics were changed slightly by scholar José María Bonilla in 1934. Guatemalan Bus. 2003. CultureGrams. ProQuest, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. . A festively painted bus in Guatemala is familiarly called a “chicken bus,” as locals often bring their chickens along (chickens ride for free). The buses are cheap to ride, are often crowded, and can be somewhat dangerous on mountainous roads. Most of the buses are old U.S. buses that no longer pass vehicle inspections. Buses provide the main form of long-distance travel. “Guatemalan Peace Agreement (1996).” World Geography: Understanding a Changing World. ABC-CLIO, n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . The Agreement for a Firm and Lasting Peace brought an end to 36 years of civil war in Guatemala. It was signed by the government of President Alvaro Arzu Irigoyen and representatives of the Guatemalan National Revolutionary Unity (URNG) on December 29, 1996 in Guatemala City. United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali also endorsed the treaty. “Guatemala ‘thieves’ lynched over flour theft.” BBC News. British Broadcasting Service, 11 Feb. 2011. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . Harvesting Corn. 2007. CultureGrams. ProQuest, 2011. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. . Young workers harvest corn. Corn is a staple, particularly for indigenous Guatemalans. It is cooked in countless different ways and appears in a variety of dishes. Corn tortillas or tamalitos are eaten with nearly every meal. Horse-drawn Taxi. 2007. CultureGrams. ProQuest, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. . This horse-drawn cart fits right in with the colonial architecture of Antigua. Contrasts between old and the new abound in Antigua, one of the best preserved colonial cities in Central America. Horse-drawn carriages for hire share the road with modern vehicles, while internet cafés may be located in colonial buildings that are hundreds of years old. KNAPPED TAPERED CELT AXE. N.d. World Museum of Man. N.p., n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2011. . This a knapped axe head. it is made from the stone chert. It was used by the Mayans to cut wood, and as a weapon. Leppanen, Sam. Ville Nueva, Guatemala City. N.d. Flickr. Yahoo!, 18 Nov. 2009. Web. 24 Feb. 2011. . Poverty in Guatemala is widespread and deeply entrenched, particularly among Poor rural people, who account for 71 per cent of the country’s poor population. The country’s high rates of illiteracy, infant mortality and infant malnourishment are even higher among indigenous peoples, most of whom live in rural areas. Poverty affects mainly young people and people living in rural areas, and it is highly concentrated among indigenous communities and households headed by women. Miglierini, Julian. “Guatemala fears Mexican drug gangs advancing.” BBC News. BBC, 20 Dec. 2010. Web. 23 Mar. 2011. . Ruffins, Ebonne. “Protecting villagers from deadly mudslides.” CNN International. Cable News Network, 10 Feb. 2011. Web. 23 Mar. 2011. . Traveler, Kango. Mayan Temple. 8 Jan. 2008. Flickr. Yahoo!, n.d. Web. 3 Mar. 2011. . When the Spanish conquistadors claimed areas of Central America and Mexico in the sixteenth century, they discovered the ruins of a great civilization, that of the Mayans, who had vanished and left evidence of their lost grandeur in massive structures that had been over-whelmed by the surrounding rain forest. Ruins in the Guatemalan highlands include Copán, a typical Mayan center with plazas, pyramids, a court for ball games, and blocks of stone inscribed with hieroglyphics. Tikal, another Mayan center in Guatemala, had more than 3,000 structures in a six-square-mile area. Vast palaces with hundreds of rooms, rows and rows of wooden huts, and increasingly larger buildings approaching the center of Tikal accommodated a surrounding community that may have numbered as many as 90,000 people. These ruins show just how important maintaining culture is to the people of Guatemala. Villatoro, Marina Kuperman. amazing-kite. 1 Nov. 2009. Flickr. Yahoo!, n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2011. . The giant kites of Guatemala, or barriletes gigantes, are in Sumpango a labor of the plight of the Indians. The tradition can be tracked to the end of the 1400s, when they made and flew their kites to honor their ancestors and rid the area of evil spirits on All Saints’ Day. They now create and fly their kites to show pride in their Mayan Indian heritage and send a quiet protest to the government that regulates and neglects Indian culture, as the government imposes barriers on Indian language, religious practice, and tradition.

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  • By: Robert C.
  • Joined: about 6 years ago
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  • Title: Guatemala
  • Robert Christoph's Peace Corps Project
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  • Published: over 5 years ago

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