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French Garden Guestbook

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French Garden Guestbook - Page Text Content

S: Civics & Econmics

BC: Brought to you by Rachel McGee & Kirby Vonegidy

FC: Executive Branch | By: Rachel McGee & Kirby VonEgidy | By: Rachel McGee & Kirby VonEgidy

1: Roles of a President OFFICAL: * Chief of State is the ceremonial head of Government and the symbol of all the nation's people. * Chief of Executive holds all of the executive power. * Chief of Administrator is the director of the federal government. * Chief Diplomat is the main architect of American foreign policy and the country's chief spokesperson. * Commander in Chief has direct and immediate control of the nations armed forces. | UNOFFICIAL: * Chief of Party is the leader of the political party that controls the executive branch. * Chief Citizen is the representative of all the people.

2: President Qualifications | FORMAL: * You must be a natural born citizen of the U.S. * You must be at least thirty-five years of age. * You must have lived in the U.S. for at least fourteen years.

3: President Qualifications | INFORMAL: *You must have experience in government or high military ranking. *You must have the ability to raise large amounts of money. *Your political belief must apply to a majority party. *You must be able to debate and answer leading questions from reporters.

4: President's $ Pay $ | The presidents salary can never be decreased or increased during his term. Back in 1789 he was paid $25,000 a year, now in 2011 he gets paid $400,000 a year. This number was changed by Congress in the year 1999. It became effective in January of 2001.

5: Congress has provided the President with a $50,000 yearly allowance. Which means the President can choose how the money is spent. Just like everyone else, he is taxed on his yearly income. Another benefit he has is being able to live in a 132-room mansion sitting on 18.3 acres estate in the heart of the nations capital, which we call the White house. He can live in this house for up to 8 years. This house comes with a sizable set of offices and a large staff, a fleet of automobiles, a team of Air Force one, and several helicopters and a team of medics. | President's Benefits.

6: Presidential Succession | In a case that the President dies, resigns, or is impeached from office, the Vice President fills the Presidents spot. The Constitution didn't originally give this succession to the Vice President. It stated that the Vice President would receive the powers and duties of the office but not the actual office. The adoption of the twenty-fifth amendment changed this.

7: 1 - Vice President 2 - Speaker of the House 3 - President Pro Tempore of the Senate 4 - Secretary of State 5 - Secretary of the Treasury * Many other Cabinets follow. | Presidential Succession

8: V I C E P R E S I D E N T | QUALIFICATIONS | The duties the Vice President has are to preside over the Senate and to help determine the question of presidential disability. | * You must be a natural born citizen of the U.S. * You must be at least thirty-five years of age. * You must have lived in the U.S. for at least fourteen years.

9: VICE PRESIDENTIAL VACANCY | It the Vice President office is vacant then the president will nominate a Vice President who will take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both houses in Congress. | Gerald Ford is a vice president who died after the president died.

10: ELECTORAL COLLEGE | The Electoral College is a group of people also known as electors chosen from each State to formally select the President and Vice President. The Electoral College has changed remarkably thoughout the centuries. The Framers had an entirely different plan for the Electoral College.

11: 1 2 T H A M E N D M E N T | The 12th amendment was added to the Constitution in 1804 to make sure that there would never again be another chaotic problem with the Electoral College. It was mainly added to make a major change in the electoral college system.

12: This is a painting of the first National Convention ever held in the United States.

13: NATIONAL CONVENTION | On the third day of the convention, the party's elect their Presidential candidate. On the fourth day of the convention, the party's vote on their Vice Presidential candidate. | The National Convention's purpose is to have meetings at which the delegates vote to pick their presidential and vice presidential candidates.

14: Presidential Wartime Powers | The Presidents as the Commander in Chief are much more advanced during a war during a regular time period. President authority goes into much more detail that the traditional military field, The President may use the armed forces to keep domestic peace. Also, if necessary, th President can call Militia into Federal service for the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the States. Basically the president controls the troops.

15: War Powers Resolution Provisions: | 1. Within 48 hours after committing American forces to battle abroad, the president must report to Congress. 2. Combat commitment must end with 60 days, unless Congress agrees to a longer period. 3. Congress may end the combat commitment at any time, by passing a concurrent resolution to that effect.

16: Electoral College vs. Popular Vote | This article is about President George bush winning his election not because of the Electoral College but by popular vote. Bush won with 3.5 million popular vote.. The red states took over the population making Bush win the republicans over. In the article it is talking about how the Electoral College is a more fair way of voting for the President verses the popular vote.

17: This is a piture of the electoral college representing each politiacal party choice the delegates chose.

18: In our newspaper article, the former President Bush began focusing mainly on winning over the black and Hispanic families. bush was trying to win with the popular vote than winning with the electoral college. he attracted those votes by making advertisements, bumper stickers, and also went to speak to the swing states in the south and Midwest states. He was running against John Kerry, who was a democrat, who did a very poor job of reaching out to get votes. Which made bush's bribing for votes all the more better. This is why our news article is a perfect example of his votes coming from the population instead of the electoral votes. | Popular Vote over the Electoral Vote

20: President Ronald Reagan urges Berlin to tear down it's wall, in 1987. The President delivered a short terse speech in attempt to challenge Mikhail Gorbachev about foreign policy. Reagan didn't originally plan on visiting Berlin, but while in Europe he received a request from the Western Germany government to speak at the Berlin Wall. President Reagan, being the Chief diplomat, altered his schedule so he could be at the nation's spokesperson and deal with foreign policy. West Germany's diplomat fore warned Reagan that West Berliners were very intelligent and politically advanced, so he would have to watch what he said. The wall took over Berlin. It separated East and West Berlin. On the west was color, movement, and life. on the East was guards, barbed wire, and rifles. Reagan's main goal was to tell East Berlin that the wall had to come down. Peter Robinson wrote Reagan's speech He had a very difficult time finding the right important matter. Both Reagan and Peter eventually just realized they simply needed to state to Germany that the wall had to be torn down immediately. | Reagan Performing His Duties

21: Robinson, Peter. "Mr. Gorbachev, opens this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, tear challenge: officials throughout President Ronald Reagan's administration advised him not to issue the now legendary Brandenburg Gate challenge, which they deemed mediocre at best and an outright affront to the Soviet leadership at worst." American History 38.4 (2003): 44+. Gale U.S History in Context. Web 4 Nov. 2011.

22: This magazine article is talking about the people against the Wars powers Act. The act requires the President to withdraw troops from any foreign engagement. Whats shocking about the act is that the supporters of the interventions had claimed that the act authorizes the presidential action to be done within two-months. Congress is the only one allowed to declare war. If the president oversteps his bounders the practical injuries open to Congress for then to stop the war. They think that the war was very pointless and do not believe his act should have been passed | Why their against the War Powers Act

23: "The War powers Act is a constitutional absurdity enacted in 1973." National Review, 20 June 2011: 4 Gale U.S History InContext. Web. 3 Nov. 2011. | Citation.

24: Words We Didn't Know

25: *Anomaly: the angular distance of a planet from its perihelion as seen from the sun. *Thwarted: to prevent the occurrence, realization or attainment. *Galling: adhesive wear used to transfer material between metallic surfaces. *Clout: the power to direct shape or otherwise influence things *Assailants: somebody who violently attacks someone else *Absurdity: ridiculousness because of irrational *Perversity: someone being very stubborn

26: "The War powers Act is a constitutional absurdity enacted in 1973." National Review, 20 June 2011: 4 Gale U.S History InContext. Web. 3 Nov. 2011. | Williams, ,Juan: "Bush shouldn't write off the Black Vote." New York Times 16 June 200: A21 Gale U.S History Context Web 4 Nov. 2011 | Citations

27: Editorial: Electoral College: Against our will." Philadelphia inquirer [Philadelphia Inquirer] 27 Oct. 2008. Gale U.S History In Context. | Robinson, Peter. "Mr. Gorbachev, opens this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, tear challenge: officials throughout President Ronald Reagan's administration advised him not to issue the now legendary Brandenburg Gate challenge, which they deemed mediocre at best and an outright affront to the Soviet leadership at worst." American History 38.4 (2003): 44+. Gale U.S History in Context. Web 4 Nov. 2011.

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  • Title: French Garden Guestbook
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  • Started: about 5 years ago
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