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Vada Robinson Spackman

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FC: MEMORIES | Vada Robinson Spackman

1: Vada Robinson Spackman was born on November 27, 1923 in Franklin, Idaho at her mom and dad's home. Her father's name was Louis Perley Robinson (born October 30, 1882 in Franklin, ID), and her mother's name was Lillie Jane Atkinson (born April 26, 1897 in Cove, UT). Vada was the sixth of nine children. Her siblings include Georgia Robinson Bair (2/22/09), Maurine Robinson Bateman (3/25/11), Donald Reed Robinson (7/7/13), Jack Heward Robinson (11/16/15), Howard Lester Robinson (1/22/19), Mary Robinson Lewis (4/26/25), Neldon Louis Robinson (5/23/28), and Carl Jay Robinson (6/20/32). Vada married Rosmond Johnson "R.J." Spackman on October 14, 1941, when she was just seventeen years old. They made their home in Richmond, Utah and lived in the same house throughout their entire marriage. Vada and R.J. adopted two children. Robin Jill Spackman was born May 26, 1960 in Provo, UT. Rene Jay Spackman was born November 27, 1961 in Ogden, Utah. Vada and R.J. had five grandchildren: Ryan Bell, Jessica Horsley, Lacey Spackman, Jenney Spackman, and Kelley Spackman. | I've had a good life.

2: Vada's great grandparents, George Robinson and Sarah Ann Holt Robinson, were both born in Manchester, Lancashire, England. They had ten children and were taught by LDS missionaries while livng in England. They were baptized on August 21, 1840, and they sailed from Liverpool to America in September of 1846. They settled in Council Bluffs, IA. In the Spring of 1852, they started west and arrived in Salt Lake City in October of 1852. After a short time, President Brigham Young sent the family to live in American Fork. George and Sarah stayed active in the church throughout the remainder of their lives. Sarah was known for her beautiful quilts and framed mottoes, such as "Home Sweet Home" and "God Bless our Home." George was a musician and played the violin. | Right: Sarah Ann Holt Robinson, Vada's great grandmother, mother of James Robinson; Below: George Robinson, Vada's great grandfather, father of James Robinson

3: Vada's material grandparents were James William Plummer Atkinson and Mary Handy. Mary Handy died years before Vada was born. Vada remembers visiting James at his home in Franklin when he was very old. Vada's paternal grandparents, James Joshua Robinson and Mary Elizabeth Griffiths lived most of their lives in Franklin, ID. Vada remembers her grandmother being "a fussy old girl." One day while eating dinner at her grandmother's house, Grandma Robinson put a newspaper under Vada's plate so she wouldn't get the tablecloth dirty. Vada remembers her beng "so fussy" and "busy all the time." Vada knew her grandmother cared about her because she had a talk with R.J., telling him that he'd better take care of her. She couldn't remember what was said, but R.J. remembered. | Ancestors | Right: Vada's paternal grandparents, James Joshua Robinson and Mary Elizabeth Griffiths Below: Vada's parents, Louis Perley Robinson and Lillie Jane Atkinson

4: "We lived in an old farmhouse. Two story. Not fancy at all. I always shared a room with Mary, and we slept in an old-fashioned iron bed. We didn't have furniture or nothing. Good heck, we couldn't have furniture in those days. There was no money to buy it. We had big gardens. Mother was a gardner. We had an orchard where we picked apples. Climbing trees was one of our hobbies because we had trees around the house and then we had the orchard. Sleigh riding was another thing we did. In the winter, the snow would get so high, we'd ride over the fence tops on our sleighs. We always ate in the kitchen. I can remember eating together around the big table. Momma did a lot of frying, and we'd eat a lot of potatoes and vegetables from the garden. Our house was heated by stoves. One in the kitchen and one in the front room, but the upstairs wasn't warm. I used to heat up a brick or a rock and take it to bed to keep warm. We didn't have indoor plumbing. Good heavens, no! There was outside toilets. We took a bath in tin tubs that we carried into the kitchen and put by the warm stove. I can remember when we got electricity in the house. We came home from school one day, and there was a long wire hanging down with a globe in it. It was a treat to get lights. Oh, boy. It was a treat!" | Childhood

5: School Days | "I used to pick beans when I was in school I bought one of my school dresses with money from picking beans. I worked all summer for it. I went to Franklin School. The elementary was on the bottom and the high school was on the top. We'd have like 15-18 kids in a class. I wasn't smart. I was smarter in English than I was in mathematics. English was my favorite subject. My school friends were Nada, Paulie, Bonnie and Ivonne. We were all friends, but we never did do much but go to school together. When I got older, I would walk from my house out to Nashville where Nada lived, and we'd just visit." | "The girls used to say, 'You've got the longest eyelashes. Vada, close your eyes and let us see.'" | "This is where I was baptized, down below Franklin.

6: Brothers & Sisters

7: Brothers & Sisters

8: When I met R.J., I was probably 16. Maurine lived where Marva Dawn lives now, and R.J. lived on the corner. Evan would holler, "Vada, R.J. wants a date." It was Black and White Days. R.J. came up and started talking to me, and then he took me home. We got engaged in the Spring down by the old pea factory in Franklin. There was a weeping willow tree, and he pulled up beside it. He took out a ring and put it on my hand. The diamond I wear is the same one R.J. gave me, but I've had it reset. We got married on October 14, 1941 in the house that used to be next door to the La Tienda. I was 17 when we got married. We rented a room on First South for just a few weeks. A couple months after we were married, this house came up for sale. We bought it for $900.00. Later, we added the new part. R.J. had a car before we got married. It was an old Ford that cost $350.00.

9: My Sweetheart | "Be united! I never did do anything to go out of my way to spite R.J. We always talked about things and agreed about everything. Whatever we did, it was always to be united."

10: World War II

11: The War We didn't have a honeymoon. The war was our honeymoon. We were married in October, and R.J. left in January of 1942 for the army. Jobs My first job was working for Sego Milk. I put the lids on the cans. I did that while R.J. was in the army. Later, I was a telephone operator. That was in the days of the old switchboards. I liked that job. I would have stayed at that job forever if they wouldn't have closed the telephone office down and moved everything to Logan. I couldn't get work in Logan. I was too short for the equipment they had. R.J. was working for the milk company when we were married. When he came back from the army, he started as a meat cutter at Theurer's. He worked there for over 40 years. We used to do mink on the side. We bought one male and ten females one year, and that started our mink ranch. We grew to about 150 females. We used to work in the mink together, side by side. He'd take one side, and I'd take the other. We'd work during his noon hour and after work at night. We never did go into debt. | work, work, work

12: Robin Jill and Rene Jay | We were married in 1941, and Jill's birthday is 1960. We were married almost 20 years. We went to the church's childrens aid. We registered with them, and one day we got a call saying they had a little girl. We had to go to Salt Lake to pick her up. I remember how excited we were to pick her up. We came back, and the first place we stopped was the service station where Louis worked. We just came home and surprised everybody. We had never made it known that we were going to adopt or anything. We went to the courthouse to get legal papers for Jill when we met someone from Children's Aid Society. We mentioned that we'd like another child. They questioned us and took our information. Not very long after, they called and said, "We've got you a boy." R.J. was killing mink. He was picking up the mink to see whether he wanted to keep them as breeders or kill them. I hollered, "R.J., they've got us a boy!" He put that mink back, and he said Rene saved that mink's life because he dropped it back in the pen. We went to Ogden to get him. We were just so excited again. Everybody was excited about it.

13: "I said to R.J., 'You know, we could have her dad's initials if we named her after Robinson, my maiden name, and Jill.' Jill came from one of Aunt Mary's (dad's youngest sister) boys'. His wife was named Jill. And then Rene got R.J.'s initials, too. He was named Rene Jay." | "Jill and Rene liked to entertain. They started piano lessons as kids. It didn't appeal to Jill very much, but Rene liked it. Jill liked to sing. She liked musicals in high school and college. They both entertained for a lot of different occasions." | Good night, we waited so long. | "When she was a baby, I remember that Jill was just the most intelligent little human. And she was a cute baby. Everybody thought she was. Rene was a good baby. He was always playing with the neighborhood kids."

14: Grandchildren

18: Colonel Sanders Chicken 3 cups self-rising flour 2 envelopes Lipton cup-a-soup- (Tomato flavor) 2 envelopes Good Seasons Italian 1 tablespoon paprika 1 teaspoon salt Cheese Roll 1 lb. Velveeta cheese 1 3 oz. package cream cheese 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder chili powder 1 cup pecans, crushed Set cheese out to soften. Blend cheeses and garlic together. Make 4 small rolls and sprinkle with chili powder. Roll in crushed pecans. Vegetable Casserole 1 bunch broccoli 1 medium cauliflower 5 carrots 1 medkum onion, sliced 1/2 cup butter 1 can cream of mushroom soup 8 oz. Velveeta cheese 1/2 to 1 cup mushrooms 1 teaspoon salt Cook vegetables separately. Toss together, cover with sauce. For sauce, melt butter over low heat. Add soup and cheese, stirring until blended. Add salt. Bake at 350 until bubbly. | Jerky 1 London Broil roast, thinly sliced 4 tablespoons liquid smoke 3 teaspoons salt 3 teaspoons onion salt 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 1/2 cups water Soak roast for 8 to 10 hours. Dry in dehydrator until done. Chili Sauce 8 quarts tomato juice 3 cups sugar 3 cups ground green peppers 2 cups ground onions 3 pints vinegar 1/2 cup salt 3 teaspoons cloves (small) 3 teaspoons cinnemon 3 teaspoons ginger Boil for three hours. Twice Baked Potatoes Bake potatoes until soft, slice in half, and remove potato from skins. Mix potato with melted butter, salt, pepper, onion salt, milk, a little bit of ground sage. Refill potato skins and sprinkle with cheese. Put back in the oven until cheese is melted. "There are no amounts. Season it to how you like it." | Spaghetti Sauce 20 lbs. tomatoes (after skinned) 2 cups chopped onions (2 lg.) 2 cups chopped green peppers (3 lg.) 2 cups chopped celery (5 stalks) 1/2 cup cooking oil (may be omitted) 2 cups chopped parsley or 1 c. dried 4 cloves chopped garlic Cook above ingredients for 1/2 hour covered. Mix and add: 4 tablespoons chili powder 2 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons rosemary 1 teaspoon basil 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 teaspoons sage 3 tablespoons salt 2 teaspoons oregano 2 teaspoons allspice 2 teaspoons pepper 2 teaspoons thyme 1 teaspoon cumin seed Cook on low heat 3 1/2 hours or more, stirring frequently. To use, combine with one can of tomato soup and hamburger. For more information, contact: Vada Spackman 170 E. 300 S. Richmond, UT 84333 (435) 258-2219 | Vada's Famous Recipes

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